Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter March 2020

ARRL LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER MARCH 2020

As you probably know by now, the AARA Rayne Hamfest was impacted by the
current Coronavirus situation.  We had just set the ARRL table up when
the announcement came.  The club was allowed to serve the crawfish and
have the guest speaker go ahead and give his presentation and then ALL
of the prizes were drawn for…..
MFJ, HamWorld, The Signman of Baton Rouge and Diamond Antennas had all
set up their tables and displays. After supper they began to rig down
and load up and I can only imagine the disappointment on their part as
well as the AARA Club and everyone planning to come and enjoy a full day
on Saturday.  We were looking forward to a really good and informative
ARRL forum on Saturday.  At this point it will be a wait and see how
this will affect hamfests scheduled next month and the months to come. 


Hamfest Update:  As of March 18, 2020 the Northeast Louisiana Hamfest in
West Monroe has been canceled. 

***Some suggestions from ASM Matt Anderson, KD5KNZ:
Here a few of the services that may be helpful to clubs to keep in touch
with their members during the "Shelter-in-Place"

Facebook Live 
www.facebook.com
Free; Requires a Facebook Page
Expected resolution: 720p (1280 x 720) at 30 frames per second
8-hour maximum length
Allows viewers to comment or ask questions during the event
Embed your live stream in a website

Free Conference Call.Com  
https://www.freeconferencecall.com/  
Pay What you can - Suggested $4
Host up to 1,000 participants
Dial-in # or VoIP calling
Chat 
Remote Desktop
Screen Sharing
Video Conferencing

Zoom  
zoom.us
Host up to 100 participants
Free plans allow calls up to 40 min each
Paid plans start at $14.99 / host / month

Message from Norm Fusaro W3IZ Director of Operations ARRL:
Here at HQ we’ve received lots of communications from our members
either asking for guidance or offering suggestions during the current
crisis.  We hope everyone is adhering to CDC and local health
department
guidelines by staying home, maintaining safe distances when around
people, and following sanitary practices. 

With many hams staying home there are opportunities to get on the air
and call CQ or gather around the local repeater.  We certainly don’t
need a reason to get on the air, after all, that’s what hams do.

In terms of ham radio preparedness, this current crisis has not
disrupted communications on a national scale. We know many of our
members practice and train for a personal radio communication
capability
that can be called on when disaster strikes. ARES volunteers and our
partners in providing emergency communications already routinely
monitor
the information and requests from Emergency Coordinators and the like.
Station and skills readiness are tenets of the Amateur Radio Service
–
and this current crisis hasn’t changed this.

We can encourage members to remain safe, and to follow the guidelines
and requests of their national and local government officials and
public
health leaders. For those members who are healthy and safe at home, we
can encourage them to get on the air:

Get on the air. As online fatigue and a feeling of isolation will
inevitably creep into our “new normal,” being on-air will introduce
variety into our communication practices. As many of us are now
homebound or working and studying from home, turning on a radio to
connect with your ham radio peers will be welcome respite!
Radio Clubs. Think of this current challenge as an opportunity to
encourage our club’s members to get on the air. Move (short) meetings
to the club’s repeater, and encourage check-ins. Organize skeds,
nets,
and challenges. Try different bands (HF, VHF, UHF…) and modes. This
will also help new radio amateurs gain practical operating experience.
Readiness. Station and skills readiness are tenets of the Amateur Radio
Service. Any time we spend on the air will contribute to developing and
practicing our personal radio communication capability.
If you are a radio amateur serving your community through the ARRL
Amateur Radio Emergency Service® (ARES) or by volunteering with any of
our partners in providing public service communications, thank you.
ARES
members routinely monitor the information and requests from their ARES
Emergency Coordinators. We are grateful for all the ways you
stand-ready
to support the emergency service personnel in your communities when
disaster strikes.

73,
Norm Fusaro, W3IZ
Director of Operations
ARRL, the national association for Amateur Radioâ„¢
225 Main Street, Newington, CT 06111-1494 USA
Telephone: (860) 594-0230 FAX: (860) 594-0259
e-mail: w3iz@arrl.org
web: www.arrl.org

SILENT KEYS (As reported in April QST)
Bertram L. Locke, WA5GXH Bossier City
Harry L. Viosca, W5OSD Mandeville
Milam C. “Lucky” Young, KA5SUR Sulphur

New Hams:  WELCOME!
Report for 2020-03-04
Kenneth Grevemberg, KI5IIY
Metairie, LA 70005-3734
Wilbert J Duhe, KI5IGY
Destrehan, LA 70047-4031
Phillip J Malbrough, KI5IJK
Houma, LA 70363-5803
James J Macareo, KI5IDM
Morgan City, LA 70380-2882
Hubert J Cavalier, KI5IDL
Napoleonville, LA 70390-8515
Kisha A Richard, KI5IHY
Maurice, LA 70555-3033
John D Young, KI5IDB
Prairieville, LA 70769-3862
Daniel D Plants, KI5IJG
Ida, LA 71044-8750
Jacob A Dickson, KI5IIP
Shreveport, LA 71106-7718
Hal H Moore, KI5IJQ
Bossier City, LA 71111-6920
Arvil A Parish, KI5IIR
Bossier City, LA 71112-3104
David G Jason, KI5IIQ
Dubach, LA 71235-2263
Justin M White, KI5IBP
West Monroe, LA 71291-8857
Bethany W Butterfield, KI5IGT
Pollock, LA 71467-3942

Upgraded License:  CONGRATULATIONS!
Report for 2020-03-04
Royce J Griffin, KI5HDD
New Orleans, LA 70123-6070
Ronnie P Voorhies, KI5HBA
Madisonville, LA 70447-3269
Adam G Chapman, KG5TOD
Ville Platte, LA 70586-2049
Matthew C Wiggins, KI5HLC
Deridder, LA 70634-4552
James A Harvey, KG5TBL
Denham Springs, LA 70706-0358
Bruce E Eilts, KD5GRC
Baton Rouge, LA 70810-1241

New/Renewed ARRL Members:  WELCOME/WELCOME BACK!
Report for 2020-03-04
Walter R Rogge, KA5ATW
Metairie, LA 70003-4305
Timothy G Lynch, AG5XK
Hammond, LA 70401-1004
Homer W Jones, KA5TRT
Independence, LA 70443-3742
Joel H Freeland, N5XQT
Slidell, LA 70458-2224
Burke Huner
Lafayette, LA 70508-5372
Kenneth J Turner, KG5YYL
Lafayette, LA 70508-8100
Gregory Lavigne, AD5HA
Washington, LA 70589-4059
Nathan J Daigrepont, KF5HXB
Denham Springs, LA 70706-8578
Christopher J Winfough, K0CJW
Denham Springs, LA 70726-2626
Daniel W Schmolke, KI5CTN
Denham Springs, LA 70726-2915
Clay Runfalo, KF5SCV
Prairieville, LA 70769-5870
Jacob A Dickson, KI5IIP
Shreveport, LA 71106-7718
Samuel C Feldhaus, KC5NJF
Monroe, LA 71201-3551
William M Drouilhet, KF5JLX
Leesville, LA 71446-6213
Bethany W Butterfield, KI5IGT
Pollock, LA 71467-3942
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FROM THE ARRL:
FCC Turns Down Amateur Licensee’s Appeal
02/26/2020
In a Memorandum Opinion and Order (MO&O) released on February 20, the
FCC turned down an appeal by William F. Crowell, W6WBJ, of Diamond
Springs, California, of an Administrative Law Judge’s (ALJ) dismissal
of Crowell’s amateur radio license renewal application. Chief ALJ
Richard L. Sippel, ruled in 2018 that Crowell “failed to prosecute his
application by refusing to attend a hearing scheduled by the judge,”
and that this warranted dismissal of Crowell’s 2007 renewal
application. The FCC Wireless Telecommunications Bureau had designated
Crowell’s renewal application for hearing based on allegations that he
had violated the Communications Act and FCC rules by causing intentional
interference and by transmitting one-way communications, indecent
language, and music on amateur frequencies. The hearing was set to be
held in Washington, DC, and Crowell filed a notice of appearance
certifying that he would appear and present his case.
The case was interrupted by what the FCC in the MO&O called “a hiatus
of several years, during which Crowell’s petition to disqualify the
Judge was pending.”
In August 2016, the FCC imposed a $25,000 fine on Crowell for
intentional interference and transmitting prohibited communications. The
FCC said in a Forfeiture Order (FO) that the penalty “is based on the
full base forfeiture amount as well as an upward adjustment reflecting
Mr. Crowell’s decision to continue his misconduct after being warned
that his actions violated the Communications Act and the Commission’s
rules.” The FCC noted that Crowell did not deny making the alleged
transmissions but argued in large part that they were protected by the
First Amendment of the Constitution,” the Forfeiture Order said. The
February 20 MO&O does not reference the Forfeiture Order nor its
disposition.
When the renewal application litigation resumed in 2017, Crowell asked
that the hearing be moved to the Sacramento, California, area, arguing
that he could not afford to travel to Washington. Sippel denied the
motion.
“In the Dismissal Order, the Judge responded to Crowell’s refusal
to
attend a hearing in Washington, D.C., by granting the Enforcement
Bureau’s motion to dismiss Crowell’s application,” the FCC
said in
its MO&O. The ALJ held that Crowell’s refusal to attend a hearing in
Washington, DC, “constituted a failure to prosecute and thereby
effectively violated Section 1.221(c) of the rules, which requires
dismissal if an applicant fails to commit to appear on the date fixed
for hearing.” The Judge agreed with the Enforcement Bureau that many
of the arguments Crowell raised on appeal “are not properly before us
in reviewing the Dismissal Order and should be disregarded.”
Crowell’s amateur license expired in 2007, but he has been permitted,
under FCC rules, to operate while his renewal application remains
pending.    

Partially Submerged NEMO-1 WSPR Buoy Retrieved by Fishing Boat
02/26/2020
The NEMO-1 WSPR buy buoy launched by AMSAT-Argentina (AMSAT-LU) on
January 30 was retrieved 12 days later by a fishing vessel. The buoy
transmitted WSPR on 14.095.6 MHz and APRS on VHF FM using the call sign
LU7AA. The captain of the tuna vessel Juan Pablo II considered that the
buoy was partially submerged, decided to retrieve it, and informed
AMSAT-LU.
The NEMO-1 traveled another 8 days aboard the tuna vessel, arriving at
Mar del Plata on February 19, where members of the Mar del Plata Radio
Club were holding it until members of AMSAT-LU could recover it. The
buoy will be reconditioned, and a new launch is planned, this time
taking the buoy more than 200 kilometers (124 miles) offshore, so that
it will navigate freely.
Coronavirus Fears Postpone Another DXpedition
02/26/2020
Alex Gromme, 5B4ALX, has postponed his March 18 – April 2 T30ET
DXpedition to Tarawa (West Kiribati) because of the coronavirus
(COVID-19) outbreak. The Kiribati Ministry of Health told Gromme that he
would need to be quarantined for 14 days in Honiara, Solomon Islands,
before getting medical approval to continue on to Kiribati. “T30ET is
currently postponed, not deleted,” Gromme said on his website. He’s
now looking at October 2020, assuming the COVID-19 situation is resolved
by then.
Last week, travel restrictions imposed on individuals entering American
Samoa as a result of the coronavirus outbreak caused Swains Island W8S
DXpedition organizers to postpone that DXpedition until later in the
year. The team members were unable to comply with a 14-day mandatory
quarantine in Hawaii. The DXpedition announced tentative dates of
September 23 – October 6.

ARRL Seeks a New Chief Executive Officer
02/27/2020
ARRL is seeking an experienced radio amateur to be Chief Executive
Officer (CEO) at its headquarters in Newington, Connecticut. The CEO is
the top compensated employee in ARRL’s management structure and
oversees all operations in collaboration with the President and the
Board of Directors, in accordance with ARRL’s Articles of Association,
Bylaws, and Board policies. The successful candidate will ensure
day-to-day management of ARRL, including fiscal operations and will
oversee and make certain that its fund-raising, marketing, human
resources, technology, advocacy, and governance strategies are
effectively implemented.
Essential CEO functions include:
•	Leading the headquarters staff and field volunteers, in response to
Board policy, in the development and implementation of effective
programs for the promotion and growth of amateur radio and the provision
of services to members.
•	Planning, developing, organizing, implementing, directing, and
evaluating ARRL’s operational and fiscal performance.
•	Providing leadership, directing headquarters staff, and maintaining
performance standards in headquarters operations.
•	Participating, in collaboration with officers, Directors, and staff,
in developing ARRL’s plans and programs.
The successful candidate will be a strategic thinker with a record of
significant amateur radio experience and a broad understanding of its
operational, technical, regulatory, and social facets. The CEO will be
responsible for effective financial and operational management and
oversight.
CEO candidates should possess a bachelor’s degree or equivalent
(master’s degree preferred), be an active radio amateur who has
initiated or led a significant amateur radio activity within the past 10
years, and have 10 years of management and supervisory experience.
Candidates should be able to demonstrate ability in providing effective
leadership and management of business operations.
The position is located at ARRL Headquarters, and the successful
candidate will be required to establish a residence in the Hartford,
Connecticut, area. 
The CEO Position Announcement includes details. Interested candidates
should submit a cover letter and resume via e-mail to ARRL Human
Resources Assistant Monique Levesque. 

International Space Station Resupply Mission to Carry New ARISS Ham
Radio Gear
02/28/2020
The scheduled March 7 SpaceX CRS-20 mission to the International Space
Station (ISS) will include the initial Amateur Radio on the
International Space Station (ARISS) Interoperable Radio System (IORS)
flight unit. The IORS is the foundation of the ARISS next-generation
amateur radio system on the space station. The ARISS hardware team built
four flight units, and the first will be installed in the ISS Columbus
module.
A second flight unit expected to be launched on a later 2020 cargo
flight will be installed in the Russian Service Module. NASA contracts
with SpaceX to handle ISS resupply missions.
The IORS represents the first major upgrade of on-station ARISS
equipment. The package will include a higher-power radio, an enhanced
voice repeater, and updated digital packet radio (APRS) and slow-scan
television (SSTV) capabilities for both the US and Russian space station
segments.
The IORS consists of a custom-modified JVCKenwood TM-D710GA transceiver,
an AMSAT-developed multi-voltage power supply, and interconnecting
cables. Once at the space station, the IORS will be stowed for later
installation. 

State of Maine Bicentennial Special Event Set for March 16 – 22
03/01/2020
A special event to mark Maine’s bicentennial will take place during
Statehood Week, March 16 – 21, with the on-air event extending to
March 22. Volunteers around the state will be on the air with special
event call signs from the nine counties that existed in 1820, when Maine
became independent of Massachusetts: W1C (Cumberland); W1H Hancock; W1K
Kennebec; W1L Lincoln; W1O Oxford; W1P Penobscot; W1S Somerset; W1W
Washington, and W1Y York.
Three other special event stations will be K1J Jameson Tavern in
Freeport; K1P Portland, and K1B Boston, in recognition of their
contributions to Maine’s Statehood.
CW, SSB, and digital operation will be continuous on HF, VHF, and UHF
for the duration of the event. The event is sponsored by the Maine
Bicentennial Special Event Committee. Maine stations may sign up to
participate as special event stations. Certificates will be available.
Additional information is available on the event website. Email
questions with the subject line “Maine 200 Special Event.”

Saint Patrick’s Day Special Event Set
03/06/2020
Many radio amateurs around the world will celebrate Saint Patrick’s
Day on the air as part of the St Patrick Award. The 48-hour event will
take place from 1200 UTC on March 16 until 1200 UTC on March 18. Saint
Patrick’s Day is March 17. SWLs are invited to take part. Awards will
be in five categories: SPD Station Award (for registered stations);
Fixed/Portable Station Award; Digital Station Award; Mobile Station
Award, and Short Wave Listener Award. Register to be an official
participating station. Visit the event’s Facebook page. — Thanks
to
Bobby Wadey, MI0RYL

Outer Space is Your Next Radio Frontier!
03/06/2020
You can make contacts through amateur radio satellites, and even with
the International Space Station, using equipment you probably own right
now! All it takes is the right information, which you’ll find in
ARRL’s new book Amateur Radio Satellites for Beginners.
Dozens of spacecraft are in orbit just waiting for your signals, and
more are being launched every year. This book is your guide to a whole
new world of operating enjoyment. Inside you will be able to locate
satellites and determine when they will be available in orbit, gain tips
for building your own “satellite station, find a simple step-by-step
guide to making your first contacts, and discover satellite antenna
projects you can build at home.
“Even with just a dual-band FM transceiver and a mobile antenna, you
can make contacts through an amateur satellite!” said ARRL author and
QST Editor Steve Ford, WB8IMY.
Building amateur radio satellites is difficult; communicating through
amateur satellites is not. Amateur Radio Satellites for Beginners will
introduce you to new experiences that you may have thought were out of
your reach. Start reading and discover how easy it can be!
Amateur Radio Satellites for Beginners is available from the ARRL Store
or your ARRL Dealer. (ARRL Item no. 1304, ISBN: 978-1-62595-130-4),
$22.95 retail, special ARRL Member Price $19.95. Call (860) 594-0355 or,
toll-free in the US, (888) 277-5289. It will also be available as an
e-book for the Amazon Kindle. 

ARISS Celebrating Successful Launch Carrying Interoperable Radio System
to ISS
03/10/2020
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is celebrating
the successful launch and docking of the SpaceX-20 commercial resupply
mission to the International Space Station (ISS). One payload on the
flight is the ARISS Interoperable Radio System (IORS), which ARISS calls
“the foundational element of the ARISS next-generation radio system”
on the space station. Amateur radio has been an integral component of
ISS missions since 2000. The Dragon cargo capsule docked successfully
with the space station on March 9. ARISS-US Delegate for ARRL Rosalie
White, K1STO, said hundreds of ARRL members contributed to make the IORS
project happen, and ARISS is celebrating the 4-year-long IORS project.
“ARISS is truly grateful to ARRL and AMSAT for their co-sponsorship
and support of ARISS since day one,” White said. “ARISS greatly
appreciates the hundreds of ham radio operators who have stood by ARISS,
sending financial support and encouragement. A robust ham station is on
its way to replace the broken radio on the ISS, and tens of thousands of
hams will enjoy strong ARISS packet and ARISS SSTV signals as a result.
In addition, thousands of students will discover and use ham radio to
talk with a ham-astronaut. We hope to see the trend continue where more
ARISS teachers and local clubs set up school ham clubs.” The new
system includes a higher-power radio, an enhanced voice repeater,
updated digital packet radio (APRS), and slow-scan television (SSTV)
capabilities for both the US and Russian space station segments.
White called the March 7 launch, “beautiful, flawless.” ARRL
President Rick Roderick, K5UR, told ARISS that he had his fingers
crossed for a successful launch.
According to NASA Mission Control, it will take the three ISS crew
members up to a month to unload and stow the 4,300 pounds of cargo on
board the Dragon capsule, and the IORS is not a priority. The actual ham
equipment will be installed in the ISS Columbus module. Another IORS
unit is in line to be launched and installed in the Russian segment of
the ISS later this year.
The IORS consists of a custom-modified JVCKenwood TM-D710GA transceiver,
a multi-voltage power supply, and interconnecting cables. The ARISS
hardware team will assemble four flight units — and 10 IORS units in
all — to support onboard flight operations, training, operations
planning, and hardware testing.
ARISS-International Chair Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, said earlier this year
that future upgrades and enhancements to the next-generation system are
in various stages of design and development. These include a repaired
Ham Video system — currently planned for launch in mid-to-late 2020,
an L-band (uplink) repeater, a microwave “Ham Communicator,” and
Lunar Gateway prototype experiment.

Dayton Hamvention Announces Cancelation of 2020 Show
03/15/2020
For the first time in its 68-year history, Dayton Hamvention® will not
take place this year, due to concerns about the coronavirus outbreak.
The glum news was not entirely unexpected, given widespread
cancellations of public gatherings and a national state of emergency.
“The Hamvention Executive Committee has been monitoring the COVID19
pandemic. We have worked very closely with our local and state health
departments. It is with a very heavy heart the Hamvention Executive
Committee has decided to cancel Hamvention for this year,” Hamvention
General Chair Jack Gerbs, WB8SCT, said in announcing the cancellation on
March 15. “This decision is extremely difficult for us, but with
around 2 months until the Great Gathering we felt this action necessary.
More specific details regarding the closure will soon be posted. Thank
you for your understanding in this time of international crisis.”
The Dayton Hamvention cancellation comes less than a week after the
International DX Convention in Visalia, California, called off this
year’s show. The Dayton Amateur Radio Association (DARA) sponsors
Hamvention.
Since 2017, Hamvention has been held each May at the Greene County
Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio. The international gathering
attracted more than 32,000 visitors in 2019.
Hamvention’s announcement has caused the cancellation of other
associated events. These include Contest University, the Contest Dinner,
and the Top Band Dinner. 

Canceled Ohio ARES State Conference Morphs into Statewide Communication
Exercise
03/17/2020
Ohio Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) canceled the Ohio ARES State
Conference set for April 4 due to the coronavirus pandemic and
repurposed the date for a statewide communication exercise, with an
emphasis on communicating from home.
“Ohio has a high-profile station at the state Emergency Operations
Center (EOC), with regular weekly EOC nets,” ARES Section Emergency
Coordinator Stan Broadway, N8BHL, said. “But with the national
emphasis on staying home, we turned the vacated day into a 2-hour series
of nets designed to have amateur operators check in using their home
stations.”
The exercise was the brainchild of Assistant SEC Tim Price, K8WFL, who
suggested it would be a great way to showcase amateur radio’s
capabilities for state and community leaders. The Ohio HF Emergency Net
will take check-ins on 40 and 80 meters (SSB), with the Ohio Digital
Emergency Net (OHDEN) operating on 80 meters. Then, around 1 PM ET, a
linked digital radio system will be brought into play, using DMR’s
Ohio talk group linked to the Fusion “Ohio Link” group. Broadway
said stations will simply check in; no traffic will be handled.
“It’s just designed to prove we can communicate from home, while
locked down, and still get the job done,” he told ARRL.
“This is the same network topology used for the Ohio Watch Desk
Project, providing statewide reporting during such events as the
Memorial Day tornado outbreak last spring,” Broadway said. The reports
are fed directly to the watch desk at Ohio’s state EOC, to enhance
situational awareness for state emergency managers. “We plan to video
an operator on the Statehouse steps, talking statewide using a small
handheld,” Broadway said. “This demonstration can be used to enhance
our discussion of amateur radio with local and state officials.”
Broadway said HF can be problematic most of the time if storms are
moving across, producing static, and digital modes fill in the gap.
“We used this [approach] during a couple tornado outbreaks to bring
real-time local observation to the Ohio Emergency Management Agency
Watch Desk,” he said. — Thanks to Stan Broadway, N8BHL

Errata to 2020 – 2024 Amateur Extra-Class Question Pool Released
03/18/2020
The NCVEC Question Pool Committee has issued errata to the new (2020 –
2024) Amateur Extra-class question pool that goes into effect on July 1.
Most changes are minor, involving typographical or style errors.
In the syllabus at the top of the pool:
E1C — Changed “bandwith” to “bandwidth”
E3B — In sub-element heading, deleted “grayline”
E9D — Changed “feedpoint” to “feed point”
In sub-element 3, changed “41 questions” to “40
questions.”
In the question pool:
E1C13 — In answer C, changed “Utilities Telecom Council” to
“Utilities Technology Council (UTC)”
E1C14 — In question, changed “Utilities Telecom Commission”
to
“Utilities Technology Council (UTC)”
E1D03 — In answer, choices C and D, changed “earth” to
“Earth”
E2A02 — In question, changed “inverted” to
“inverting”
E3B — In sub-element heading, deleted “grayline”
E3B08 — Question withdrawn from pool and marked as deleted. The
remaining questions in E3B were not renumbered, leaving 11 questions.
E5B04 — In question, changed “220 microfarad” and “1
megohm”
to “220-microfarad” and “1-megohm”
E7C09 — In answer B, added a space between “1” and
“kHz”
E8C10 — In question, changed “symbol” to “data”
E9C02 — In question, changed “1/4 wavelength” to
“1/4-wavelength”
E9C03 — In question, changed “1/2 wavelength” to
“1/2-wavelength”
E9D — in sub-element heading, changed “feedpoint” to
“feed
point”
E9E09 — Removed brackets after answer (C).
The Amateur Extra-class question pool will be updated to reflect these
changes. Submit feedback or questions to the Question Pool Committee.
 
FCC Levies $18,000 Fine on Louisiana Amateur Radio Licensee
03/18/2020
In an enforcement case prompted by complaints filed in 2017, the FCC has
imposed an $18,000 forfeiture on Jerry W. Materne, KC5CSG, of Lake
Charles, Louisiana, for intentional interference and failure to
identify. The FCC had proposed the fine in a Notice of Apparent
Liability (NAL) in the case in July 2018, and, based on Materne’s
response to the NAL, the agency affirmed the fine in a March 12
Forfeiture Order (FO).
As the FCC recounted in the FO, an FCC agent “observed Materne causing
intentional interference to a local repeater by generating digital noise
into an analog radio.” The agent further reported that Materne failed
to transmit his call sign, as required.
Materne disputed the FCC’s findings, arguing that the NAL should be
canceled because the agent “was mistaken in his determination that the
source of the interference was Materne’s station” as his radio was
not capable of operating on the repeater frequency in question, the FCC
said in the NO. Materne also asserted that he is unable to pay the fine
and suggested in his response that the FCC should be able to access his
financial information.
The FCC countered that the radio the agent observed in Materne’s
possession was capable of operating on the frequency in question. “We
therefore are unpersuaded…that the proposed forfeiture should be
cancelled because, he alleges, he was not the party causing interference
to the repeater and the radio in his possession could not operate on the
frequency in question,” the FCC said in affirming the findings of the
NAL. “We are also unpersuaded by Materne’s argument that he lacks
the ability to pay the full $18,000 forfeiture.” The FCC said Materne
failed to provide the FCC with proof of inability to pay, as required by
the NAL.
The FCC gave Materne 30 days to pay the fine, or face having the case
turned over to the US Department of Justice for enforcement. 

K3YV Wins the March QST Cover Plaque Award
03/19/2020
The winning article for the March 2020 QST Cover Plaque award is
“Leaky” Antenna Switches by Ellwood (Woody) Brem, K3YV.
The QST Cover Plaque Award -- given to the author or authors of the most
popular article in each issue -- is determined by a vote of ARRL members
on the QST Cover Plaque Poll web page. Cast a ballot for your favorite
article in the April issue today.

Ham Radio Clubs Connect Amid Social Distancing
03/20/2020
As college campuses have sent students home to finish their classes
online, members of the K7UAZ Amateur Radio Club in Tucson — a student
organization at the University of Arizona — have moved their radio
club meetings to, well, the radio. K7UAZ Station Manager Curt Laumann,
K7ZOO, said that when the university largely shuttered its campus, club
president Ken Gourley, KM6BKU, immediately transitioned regular meetings
to an on-the-air format using the university repeater. The club already
was holding a weekly net on Monday nights, but the added on-air club
meetings offer another opportunity to get on the radio.
In recent months, in-person K7UAZ club meetings have hosted
presentations on such topics as EME (Earth-moon-Earth) communication and
an AMSAT CubeSat simulation. As meetings move on the air, Gourley
explained, he will send out a copy of meeting presentation slides so
members can follow along. “I will lead the net and start with
check-ins,” he said. “We will work our way through the slides,
discussing previous events, upcoming activities, the treasurer’s
report, projects, etc. I will take new check-ins every 5 – 10 minutes.
We will conclude with officer comments and general comments. Hopefully
it won’t take more than 30 – 45 minutes.”
ARRL staff member Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R, who liaises for the ARRL
Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative (CARI), underscores the importance
that all radio clubs encourage on-the-air activity in this challenging
time. “While I know many businesses and schools have moved to online
meetings and learning, I can think of many advantages for a radio club
to move club meetings to on-air,” Inderbitzen said. His list
includes:
Holding short meetings on the air will encourage individual club members
to practice their personal radio communication capabilities. Station and
skills readiness are tenets of the Amateur Radio Service.
Nets generally help new radio amateurs gain practical operating
experience. Think of this current challenge as an opportunity to
encourage your club’s new hams to get on the air.
As online fatigue and a feeling of isolation will inevitably creep into
our “new normal,” being on-air will introduce variety into our
communication practices. As many of us are now homebound working or
studying, turning on a radio to connect with your ham radio peers will
be welcome respite! 
At K7UAZ, experienced club members provide instruction for members to
access the K7UAZ ARC repeater from 2 meters and via Echolink. The club
also offers members the opportunity to borrow handheld radios or to be
patched in via HF or videoconferencing, if they live too far away from
the repeater.
ARRL is encouraging university radio clubs to network with other clubs
and students via ARRL’s CARI Facebook group. “Keeping our campus
radio clubs going will ensure we are, together, advancing the art,
science, and enjoyment of amateur radio. It’s our collective
mission,” Inderbitzen said. 

Refund Procedures in Place for Dayton Hamvention-Associated Social
Events
03/20/2020
Refunds are being processed for Dayton Hamvention-associated social
gatherings, including Contest University, Contest Dinner, and Top Band
Dinner. Each event has its own procedures. Those who signed up for the
DX Dinner will be able to obtain refunds via PayPal. An email to all
registrants will provide details. — Thanks to Tim Duffy, K3LR, SWODXA

Long Island CW Club Offering Free, Online Morse Code Instruction for
Homebound Youngsters
03/20/2020
The Long Island CW Club in New York is offering free, online Morse code
instruction for the “many youngsters at loose ends as a result of
school closings due to COVID-19 concerns.” The club’s co-founder,
Howard Bernstein, WB2UZE, pointed out that learning Morse code is “a
fun and educational activity for children of all ages that can fill part
of the gap left by the current unfortunate situation that has closed so
many schools across the country.”
Ongoing classes will take place Monday through Friday, specifically for
school-agers anywhere across the country or overseas, via Zoom online
video conferencing. A computer equipped with a microphone and camera is
required. Classes for elementary schoolers run 30 minutes starting at
1600 UTC, followed by 45-minute classes for middle- and high school-aged
students starting at 1645 UTC. Parental permission is required through
advance registration. Contact class instructor Rob Zarges, K2MZ, by
e-mail or call 508-831-8248. — Thanks to Mel Granick, KS2G, ARRL New
York City-Long Island Section Public Information Coordinator 

FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly Nominated for Another Term
03/20/2020
President Donald Trump has nominated FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly
for another 5-year term on the Commission. The nomination was sent to
the US Senate on March 18. O’Rielly was initially appointed to the FCC
in 2013 by President Barack Obama.
“During my tenure at the Commission, I have advocated for preserving
and advancing American free market principles to develop common sense
regulation and eliminate unnecessary rules that hurt consumers,”
O’Rielly said in a statement, expressing appreciation to President
Trump.
“I hope to continue this work should the Senate decide to approve my
nomination.” If the Senate confirms O’Rielly’s nomination,
the new
term would date retroactively to last July and end in 2024.
In a statement, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai praised O’Rielly’s work in
such areas as 3.5 GHz spectrum policy.

ARRL Headquarters Remains in Operation, Many Staffers Working Remotely
03/20/2020
Interim ARRL Chief Executive Officer Barry Shelley, N1VXY, informed
members on March 20 that ARRL will remain operational to meet their
needs during the coronavirus pandemic. Shelley noted that ARRL is taking
steps to help protect the health and safety of ARRL Headquarters
employees, in line with the recommendations provided by US and
Connecticut health officials and government leaders.
“We have arranged for many of our staff, depending on their job
responsibilities and requirements, to work remotely during this
unprecedented time,” Shelley said. “This helps the organization
reduce the number of people in the building and improve our ‘social
distancing’ capabilities.”
At present, all departments at ARRL Headquarters are functioning, and
customer service representatives remain available to answer members’
questions or direct them to the appropriate department for assistance.
Shelley advised that ARRL is encouraging members to use email as the
preferred method of communication with ARRL, in order to get a timely
response.
The ARRL Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (VEC) has been dealing with a
higher-than-normal volume of emails and phone calls and is asking for
members’ patience as they attempt to answer everyone’s questions
as
promptly as possible. “There has been some significant disruption to
VE exam session schedules, given the restrictions imposed on gatherings
in many locales,” Shelley pointed out. “As with our employees, the
health and safety of our Volunteer Examiners is a top priority, and we
have informed our VEs that they need to follow their local community’s
guidelines and then use their best judgement when deciding whether to
conduct, postpone, or cancel an exam session.”
As previously announced, ARRL has suspended all tours and guest visits
to ARRL Headquarters and to W1AW until further notice. ARRL has also
posted a statement relating to Field Day and the coronavirus situation.
“We will continue to monitor conditions from this outbreak and follow
any additional guidelines provided by federal and state health
professionals and government officials. We thank you for your
understanding and patience during this difficult time,” Shelley said.


2020 ARRL Field Day Update:
 
Coronavirus & Field Day 2020

With 2020 ARRL Field Day – one of the biggest events on the Amateur
Radio calendar – just about 15 weeks away, ARRL officials are
monitoring this situation with the coronavirus very closely and paying
close attention to all of the information and guidance being offered by
the CDC's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
(https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html).

At its core, Field Day is a local event and an opportunity for local
amateur radio clubs to showcase the skills, science and technologies
that make radio communication such a wonderful hobby and a valuable
public service. Since the impact of the coronavirus outbreak has been
very different in different parts of the country, we recommend that all
amateur radio clubs participating in Field Day be in regular contact
with their local or state public health officials for their advice and
guidance on hosting Field Day activities. This also offers an
opportunity for amateur radio clubs to bolster or re-establish their
relationships with local and state public health and emergency
management officials.

Because of the unique circumstances presented this year, this can be an
opportunity for you, your club and/or group to try something new.  Field
Day isn't about doing things the same way year after year - use this
year to develop and employ a new approach that is in line with our
current circumstances.

Local club officials are the most appropriate people to be making
decisions about their specific Field Day programs. We are all concerned
about protecting the health and safety of those participating in or
attending Field Day activities, and so we trust local club officials to
take the appropriate steps to monitor local conditions and make
decisions in the best interest of their communities.

ARRL officials strongly believe that following the guidelines of local,
state and national health care professionals will help ensure everyone's
safety in the coming weeks and months. 

ARRL Field Day is always held on the 4th full weekend in June -- 27-28,
2020.
 
2020 Field Day results will appear in December QST.

ARRL Headquarters is Closing
03/23/2020
ARRL Headquarters will comply with an executive order from Connecticut
Governor Ned Lamont that all non-essential businesses and not-for-profit
entities reduce in-person workforces by 100% no later than March 23,
2020, at 8 PM. ARRL will equip as many Headquarters staffers as possible
to work remotely.
W1AW bulletin and code practice transmissions will continue. Customer
service representatives will be available to take calls, although
response times could be longer than usual. Operations at the ARRL
Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (VEC) will also continue, and the best
way to receive a timely response is via email, as call volume has been
heavy. The ARRL publication schedule will remain unchanged.
The ARRL warehouse will be working with a reduced staff, so orders will
be delayed, and ARRL will not be able to respond to expedited shipping
orders. ARRL Headquarters will remain open until 5 PM on March 23, as
managers and staff prepare for the shutdown.
ARRL will keep members posted on this situation.

Radio Amateurs Team Up to Help University Design Low-Cost Ventilator
03/23/2020
Amateur radio volunteers from around the world have volunteered to
assist University of Florida Professor Sam Lampotang and his engineering
team in their quest to rapidly develop an open-source, low-cost patient
ventilator that can be built anywhere from such commonly available
components as PVC pipe and lawn-sprinkler valves. The amateur radio
volunteers are developing Arduino-based control software that will set
the respiratory rate and other key parameters in treating critically ill
coronavirus victims.
Multiple volunteers responding to a call for help from Gordon Gibby, MD,
KX4Z, included noted software developer Jack Purdum, W8TEE, and  uBITX
transceiver maker Ashhar Farhan, VU2ESE. University of Florida
physicians are working to address the critical legal aspects as the
design moves closer to fruition.
The ventilator’s valves would precisely time compressed oxygen flow
into patient breathing circuits under Arduino control, allowing
exhausted patients with “stiff” lungs impacted by viral pneumonia to
survive until their body can clear the infection. The software design
team is also adding simple features such as an LCD display, encoders to
choose parameters, and watchdog safety features. -- Thanks to Gordon
Gibby, KX4Z

FROM AROUND THE SECTION:
Louisiana QSO Party Announcement:
Fellow Ham Radio Operators,
I'm Scott, W5WZ, President of the Louisiana Contest Club.  We sponsor
the
annual Louisiana QSO Party.
Please accept this invitation to participate in the 2020 edition of the
Louisiana QSO Party.
The 2020 edition of the Louisiana QSO Party will run from 14:00 UTC,
April
4, 2020 to 02:00 UTC, April 5, 2020 (9:00 AM to 9:00 PM CDT Saturday,
April
4, 2020).
The rules, and all other pertinent information is found online at:
http://laqp.org/
I do hope you'll join us on the air!
73, Scott W5WZ

ARES:
ARES Monthly Section Emergency Coordinators Report
1. ARRL Section:  Louisiana
2. Month:  February
3. Year: 2020
4. Total number of ARES members: 427
5. Number of DECs/ECs reporting this month: 8
6. Number of ARES nets active:  51
7. Number of nets with NTS liaison:  2
8. Calls of DECs/EC reporting:  W4NDF KD5BNH KE5BMS AG5LR KD5DFL W5GAS
KD5IGZ KE5GMN
 9a. Number of exercises & training sessions this month:  44     
  9b.  Person hours:  562
10a. Number of public service events this month:  2     10b. Person
hours:  125 
11a. Number of emergency operations this month:  0    
11b. Person hours:  0 
12a. Number of SKYWARN operations this month:  1 
 12b. Person hours:  10
13a. Auto Sum 9a, 10a, 11a, 12a:  47
 13b. Auto Sum 9b, 10b, 11b, 12b:  697
Reported by:  Jim Coleman, AI5B
                         ARRL Louisiana Section Emergency Coordinator

http://www.arrl.org/ares-el?issue=2020-03-18

***Please congratulate our newest Emergency Coordinator appointee from
Beauregard Parish, Lonnie Jacobs AC5A. Welcome to the Team Lonnie.

Louisiana Traffic Net Report:
Sessions   QNI   QTC   QTR
16.             353    27      416
Reported by:
Jimmy Lewis, AB5YS
Louisiana Section Traffic Manager

The Louisiana Traffic Net will run six days a week Sunday through Friday
during the pandemic. I would encourage each one of you with a General
class license and above to check-in with us. We meet at 6:00pm CDT on
3.910MHZ. 
Jim Lewis AB5YS Louisiana Traffic Net Manager
REGION 4:
ACADIANA AMATEUR RADIO ASSOC., INC. - March 2020 Volume 60, Number 03
VE Test Session February 6, 2020 73, de Greg ~ K5LFT Started off the
year pretty good. Two new Techs & one upgrade to Amateur Extra. The
candidates were Kisha Richard ~KI5IHY ~ of Maurice & Louis Truxillo
~KI5IHZ ~ of Breaux Bridge both earned their Technician. Adam Chapman
~KG5TOD~ from Ville Platte Upgraded to Extra. Congratulations to the
testees & a great big thank you to the VEs in attendance...... The VEs
for this session were Michael Cavell KI5ARX, John Cunniff W4HVH, Richard
Wallace KF5KEL, Archibald Hill W5AG, and Galen Wilson KF5BET

JOY BREAUX N5YCS - SILENT KEY It is with great sadness that the Amateur
Radio World and the Acadiana Amateur Radio Association, Inc. (AARA)
loses another member. On the evening of February 7, 2020, Joy Breaux
N5YCS passed away after being on life support for a while. Her wishes
were that her body to be donated to science, no obituaries, or funeral
announcements to be published. A little about Joy for those who or who
did not know her. Joy was a long time member of the AARA and served as
past treasurer for 12 years. Joy and Rick shared in being "backyard bird
watchers" among other hobbies such as traveling, attending hamfests,
especially the AARA hamfest where you could usually find her at the
front door at the registration desk. Joy and Rick also participated in
many special event activities. Joy & Rick were long time members of the
QCWA Chapter 109 in Baton Rouge. I am sure all that knew Joy will miss
the beautiful smile and kind words she had for everyone. Our prayers go
out for the Breaux family.

Randy Rushing KG5KFI - Silent Key Thanks to Greg Dolan II - K5LFT, it
was just noted that Randy Rushing KG5KFI, age 53 of Breaux Bridge,
became a Silent Key on January 7, 2020. Randy was a proud United States
Veteran. He served honorably in the U.S. Army, and was a member of the
American Legion Post #69, Blind Veterans Association, Veterans of
Foreign Wars, Disabled American Veterans, and the Acadiana Honor Guard.
He was also a Amateur Radio Operator (KG5KFI) and a member of the
Acadiana Amateur Association, Inc. in 2016. Obituary:
https://www.waltersfh.com/obituary/Randy-Rushing

SPANISH RICE 2 Tbs Olive Oil 1 Onion, finely chopped 1 Garlic, minced 2
Cups long-grain Rice 3-1/4 Cup Chicken Broth 1 Cup diced Tomato, drained
½ tsp Oregano 1 tsp Salt Heat olive oil in large skillet on medium/high
heat. Add the rice and stir it so that the rice coats with the oil.
Cook, stirring often, until much of the rice has browned. Add the onion
and cook, stirring frequently another 3 minutes, until the onions begin
to soften. Add the garlic and cook until the onions are translucent and
softened, about a minute more. Combine broth, tomato, oregano, salt, and
browned rice with onions and garlic. Bring to a boil Cover; reduce heat
to a low simmer. Cook for 20-30 minutes, depending on the type of rice
and the instructions on the rice package. Remove from heat for 5
minutes. Fluff with a fork to serve.

REGION 6:
FROM:  The Brass Key April 2020 A Publication of the Central Louisiana
Amateur Radio Club
Attendance at the March 2020 meeting, during which we had Skywarn Basic
Storm Spotter Training, was encouraging. Andy Patrick,
Meteorologist-in-Charge at the National Weather Service in Lake Charles,
conducted the training and did a fine job. In addition to presenting the
required information on the slides, he added some personal observations
about storms in our area based on his 35 years of experience in the
weather business. We had several in attendance who were not club members
including five deputies from Rapides Parish Sheriff’s Office, a city
marshal, Tyler Hall of KALB Weather, and the Executive Director of
Rapides Parish 911/Office of Homeland Security and Emergency
Preparedness (OHSEP), Sonya Wiley-Gremillion. The Executive Director
expressed an interest in having amateur radio operators participate in
emergency preparedness and communication. Based on her expressed
interest in participation by amateur radio operators, I met with the
Director for an hour and a half at her office. I learned that our
147.330 and 443.300 repeaters were purchased with grant money connected
to the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES). I learned that
these repeaters are housed in an environmentally controlled,
government-owned facility, and that the antennas are on a
government-owned tower. The cost of continuing operation, utilities and
tower space, of these repeaters is borne by 911/OHSEP; therefore,
Central Louisiana Amateur Radio Club (CLARC) is, in a manner of
speaking, somewhat “joined at the hip” with Rapides 911/OHSEP.
Utilities and tower space are valuable commodities, and CLARC is getting
them for free. During our meeting, the Director cited some actual
emergency events when she needed amateur radio communication, both HF
and VHF, but it was not forthcoming. She expressed an interest in having
amateur VHF and HF capabilities available to her when the need arises.
During our meeting, we identified a location for an amateur radio
operating position at Rapides 911/OHSEP. Anyone who serves at the 911
center will need to be vetted, which includes a criminal history
investigation. Before anyone takes me to task, I am fully aware that
CLARC and the Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) are separate and
distinct entities. CLARC is, however, the largest organized group of
amateur radio operators within the parish, and as stated above, has a
relationship with Rapides 911/OHSEP. Currently, that relationship is
oneway. Local amateur radio operators are deriving benefit and providing
nothing in return. We need to identify an ARES Emergency Coordinator
(EC) and an assistant or deputy EC for Rapides Parish, and we need ARES
radio operators. The people in these roles need to be accessible,
responsive (in a timely fashion), and responsible if called by
911/OHSEP. If the EC is away, then the assistant needs to be able to
respond in a timely fashion. With the exception of some man-made
emergencies, our events usually involve weather-related problems, and in
most cases, we know in advance that there may be power outages, property
damage, and injuries. Membership in ARES does not mean that one is “on
call” 24x7x365. It does mean that if one is not providentially or
otherwise seriously hindered, one should agree to serve. Public service
of this nature is a gratifying experience. As a communicator, you are
part of the solution, you are helping fellow citizens, and given that
you are working with the decision-makers, you know what is happening
during an emergency event. When the ARES organization for Rapides Parish
is up and running, it will exist more or less independently of CLARC
under the guidance of the EC and not in competition with CLARC. Please
think about volunteering for ARES service if you have not already done
so. I’ll remind you that one of the primary reasons you have an
amateur radio license is “Recognition and enhancement of the value of
the amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial
communication service, particularly with respect to providing emergency
communications,” and I’ll remind you that the reason CLARC has two
nice repeaters with free rent and utilities is for public service. I was
disappointed that we had to cancel the April meeting, VE testing, and
board meeting, but we had no choice. At this point, you know as much as
I know about our May meeting. Hopefully we will be somewhat back to
normal by then and be able to meet. We have some good programs waiting
to be presented not the least of which is Skywarn Advanced Storm Spotter
training that is scheduled for the May meeting. For the June meeting, we
will need to discuss Field Day plans. Field Day is scheduled for
Saturday, June 27 and Sunday, June 28. Assuming we are free of current
restrictions, we will begin to set up on Friday, June 26. We will
conduct Field Day at the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
Outdoor Education Center in Woodworth, which is the same location we
used for our successful Winter Field Day. One of our members has
suggested that we have some building sessions. Those interested could
agree on a common project for the building session. The common project
could be a code-practice oscillator, a balun, a wire antenna of some
sort or whatever else. The project would be up to those interested in
building something. Building something and actually having it work well
is an educational and satisfying experience. Building sessions could be
held at a mutually agreeable time and place but not during a club
meeting. The rationale behind this is to learn a little more about
electronics, to learn how to build things we might otherwise buy, and to
build a quality product for our own use. A building session or sessions
will not be of interest to everyone in the club, and it doesn’t have
to be. It would be, however, a way for a few members to get together,
learn something, have some fun, and walk away with some new equipment. 
73 and good DX, John, N5CM CLARC President

Many of us are self-isolating due to the Corona Virus threat, but this
does not mean that we have to isolate without communicating. I think
that most of us are staying in touch with our friends and relatives via
phone and social media, and we need to keep that up. To increase
socialization we cannot forget about ham radio. If all you have is your
technician license you have a number of ways to communicate with the
outside world while still staying physically isolated. Starting with
local methods of ham radio communications we have our club repeaters.
Start by throwing out your callsign on the 147.330. This is the club's
main frequency. Many hams monitor this frequency throughout the day. Our
secondary repeater is 147.375. Next are our linked repeaters, 444.975
and 145.470. These two repeaters are internet linked. If you key up and
say your call sign someone may come back to you from almost anywhere in
the U.S.. Don’t forget about using Echolink on your phone to get into
the 147.330 repeater. CLARC congratulates new hams Will Butterfield,
KI5IPJ and Etienne Blanchat, KI5IPK, for passing their Technician Class
exam on March 3. Congrats go to John Eubanks, KI5HVM, for upgrading to
Amateur Extra! CLARC also welcomes Will to our club as its newest
member! On the HF front: HF activity has picked up since the Corona
virus threat has hit the U.S. 80 and 40 meters are usually open most
evenings and during the daytime it’s not uncommon to find someone to
have a QSO with on 15, 17 and 20 meters. If you have any questions about
how to get active on the bands please get with me or one of our other
club members. We will help you. Some of your questions can be answered
by going to the club’s website at www.clarc.us 
Thanks, Scott Wren, KD5DFL Vice President, CLARC

Update on ALLSTAR The repeater committee has successfully linked the
444.975 and 145.470 repeaters to the new controller. The link is now
active, but we are still tweaking the settings and we should have full
ALLSTAR accessibility in the very near future. This project has been
ongoing, and due to the technical nature of the system and everyone's
schedules lining up as well as a little luck and Pixie Dust we have made
significant headway and foresee the project being complete in the very
near future. I would like to thank Scott KD5DFL for his extensive
efforts working with Matt Anderson KD5KNZ, Angelo Glorioso N5UXT, and
would like to thank Dave Van Rood KG5POW for his help with this project
as well. I also helped in this endeavor but not nearly to the extent
that these other gentleman have and their efforts are greatly
appreciated and the All Star system is going to be a great asset for all
members of CLARC. The system is up, and the repeaters work locally as
they should for the moment, we are doing some tweaking of the system and
it's not fully operational but the hard part is done and now we just
have to tweak the All Star system and it should be fully operational
shortly. 
Marlin, KG5RPZ 
NOTE: More information on ALLSTAR, see allstarlink.org/

As many of you already have discovered, a CLARC Members only Facebook
group has been recently created. Our President, John N5CM, and Marlin
KG5RPZ, are the administrators. As an administrator and moderator, our
president has the power to delete or make changes as he sees fit.
Members can and are encouraged to invite other Members and we also
welcome anyone else who wants to join, the group web page is:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/673431650062145/ any CLARC Members that
want to join need only list their call signs and either John or Marlin
can approve them. The Group was created to give CLARC Members a medium
to share ideas, projects all things Amateur Radio related, and encourage
fellowship between members between meetings. We also encourage Elmering
or if members just have a question please feel free to ask and someone
from the group will try and help them.

REGION  9:
The SELARC "Hamster"
*Serving Amateur Radio Since 1974*
Published Monthly by the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club Inc.
Visit our website: www.selarc.org
Vol. 47, No. 3 ......................... March 2020
Happy Birthday
Birthday Wishes for March go out to - Joe KG5HZU, Jerry N5GKJ, and Bob
WB5FBS
If we missed your birthday, then please let us know.
Get Well Soon —
Best wishes for continued recuperation go to SELARC members Tom Simpson
N5HAY and Homer Jones KA5TRT. We look forward to hearing you on the
air!
VE Session Results
Hammond VE Group - 23 Feb, 2020 - VE Session Results
Congratulations to the following new Amateur Radio Operators and
upgrades
Technician
Charles Richardson / KI5ILL - Holden, La.
Johnny Shaw / KI5ILM - Covington, La.
Travis Tharp / KI5ILN - Denham Springs, La.
General
Billy Orehowsky / KI5HZE - Saucier, Ms.
Tyrone Burns - VE Liason - Hammond VE Group

March Prize Drawing winners:  CONGRATULATIONS!!!
ARRL Publications:
Club:  Southeast Louisiana  Amateur Radio Club (SELARC)
ARRL Member:  Daniel W. Delcambre, KE5UM
ELECTRONIC PRIZE (Scanner):  Daniel R. Vandervort, AD5NW

NEXT DRAWING IS APRIL 1ST.

As always before I send out my newsletter, I feel like I have left
something out.  Please send me or one of our Section’s PIO’s/PIC
Joe
Holland KB5VJY anything you would like to see in future newsletters!
LAARRL.org

73,

--------------------------------------------------------------------
ARRL Louisiana Section
Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR
k5jmr@arrl.org
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter February 2020

ARRL LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER FEBRUARY 2020

The Hammond Hamfest was very successful and well attended. We had
approximately 50 in the ARRL/ARES Forum. Jim and Corey gave us a great
ARES presentation.  WE gave away some very nice prizes!  Next hamfest is
in Rayne in March. I hope to see many of you there.  

SILENT KEYS:
Milam Columbus "Lucky" Young, KA5SUR
Joy Breaux, N5YCS

**I was asked recently to include the city for each person listed below;
and am doing so in hopes that you will be able to see those in your area
and include them in your local activities…..

NEW HAMS:
Report for 2020-02-04
Daniel R Sicuro, KI5HVO
Kenner, LA 70062-6040
Patrick M Brown, KI5HSL
Hammond, LA 70403-0431
Hailey R Doucet, KI5HTC
New Iberia, LA 70563-3320
Chad D Durr, KI5HSK
Opelousas, LA 70570-1360
Adam C Permenter, KI5HZD
Clinton, LA 70722-5260
Devin B Martin, KI5HZC
Greenwell Springs, LA 70739
James D Pastorick, KI5HSM
Greenwell Springs, LA 70739-3854
Colton W Byrd, KI5HVR
West Monroe, LA 71291-4740
Bryan R Fussell, KI5HVJ
Alexandria, LA 71303-2126
Jeffrey P Foley, KI5HVK
Pineville, LA 71360-0623
John L Eubanks, KI5HVM
Pineville, LA 71360-5801
Corey Paulk, KI5HVL
Pineville, LA 71360-9718

LICENSE UPGRADES:
Report for 2020-02-04
Bradley K Vincent, KG5KZR
Gueydan, LA 70542-3725
Tiphanie Clark, KI5DUG
Baton Rouge, LA 70810-1627
Ricky L Little, KI5GEI
West Monroe, LA 71292-0421
Jason M Bowen, KB5VXX
Newellton, LA 71357-5002
Christopher A Wright, KI5HDW
Pineville, LA 71360-5479

NEW/RENEWED ARRL MEMBERS:
Report for 2020-02-04
Michael S Foster, KC8PZA
Metairie, LA 70005-4034
Andre P Granier, KI5BBO
Luling, LA 70070-4242
Albert D Geier, KW5PAN
River Ridge, LA 70123-2723
Elizabeth E Wotawa, KI5HRA
New Orleans, LA 70123-6147
Federico M Lertora, KI5HQU
New Orleans, LA 70123-6169
William R Hare, N5WRH
Abita Springs, LA 70420-3312
Christopher J Ancelet, N5MCY
Egan, LA 70531-3011
Bradley K Vincent, KG5KZR
Gueydan, LA 70542-3725
Paul T Holcomb, KI5ARR
Maurice, LA 70555-3825
Chad D Durr, KI5HSK
Opelousas, LA 70570-1360
Carl W Service, KG5GGL
Lake Charles, LA 70605-6527
Matthew C Wiggins, KI5HLC
Deridder, LA 70634-4552
Henry H Forrester, KG5GVV
Clinton, LA 70722-4849
Dawson Andrews
French Settlement, LA 70733-2540
Toby J Latino, KI5ERB
Prairieville, LA 70769-3341
Robert Gray, KI5GYO
Blanchard, LA 71009-0245
William W Barrett, WW5MB
Keithville, LA 71047-8806
Grantham P Frederick, KI5GBD
Shreveport, LA 71106-2209
Elizabeth O Miller, N5UIJ
Shreveport, LA 71107-2408
Richard E Hayes, AC5EU
Monroe, LA 71203-2230
Stephanie E Miller, KD7KWS
Monroe, LA 71203-9575
Carolyn Morris, KM5YL
Downsville, LA 71234-3410
James L Wilhelm, WW5L
Sterlington, LA 71280-0427
Robert A Moore, W5OPF
West Monroe, LA 71292-1625
Bryan Fussell, KI5HVJ
Alexandria, LA 71303-2126
Jeffrey W Hall, KA5YZQ
Alexandria, LA 71303-4152
Frederic W Smith, KG5PKG
Alexandria, LA 71303-4160
Jason M Bowen, KB5VXX
Newellton, LA 71357-5002
Jeff P Foley, KI5HVK
Pineville, LA 71360-0623
John L Eubanks, KI5HVM
Pineville, LA 71360-5801


FROM THE ARRL:

ARRL On the Air Podcast Premieres on January 16
01/14/2020
ARRL’s new On the Air podcast for those just getting started on their
amateur radio journey, will debut this Thursday, January 16, with a new
podcast posted each month. The podcast is a companion to the new
bimonthly On the Air magazine, which is already on its way to member
subscribers. On the Air magazine editor Becky Schoenfeld, W1BXY, will be
the host of the new podcast. Both the podcast and the magazine are aimed
at offering new and beginner-to-intermediate-level radio amateurs a
fresh approach to exploring radio communication.

Listeners can find the On the Air podcast at Blubrry, Apple iTunes (or
by using your iPhone or iPad podcast app (search for On the Air), and
Stitcher (or through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android
devices). Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

Each On the Air podcast will take a deeper dive into the articles and
issues raised in the magazine, including advice and insight on topics
covering the range of amateur radio interests and activities: radio
technology, operating, equipment, project building, and emergency
communication.

Supplementing On the Air will be a new Facebook page for those who share
a love of radio communication and are looking to learn and explore more
about their interests.

The biweekly Eclectic Tech podcast for experienced radio amateurs will
launch on February 13. Hosted by QST Editor Steve Ford, WB8IMY, Eclectic
Tech will highlight topics involving amateur and non-amateur technology,
offer brief interviews with individuals involved in projects of interest
to amateurs, and include practical information of immediate benefit to
today’s hams. Eclectic Tech will be available via iTunes and
Stitcher.

The ARRL Mags apps including QST and On the Air are now live on Apple
iTunes and Google Play. The digital edition of On the Air magazine is
now live and linked from the On the Air page on the ARRL website.   

YOTA Month Reported a Success in the Americas
01/15/2020
For several years now, Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) has sponsored YOTA
Month each December, primarily involving young radio amateurs in Europe
and Africa. In December, youth-operated amateur radio stations in the
Americas picked up the ball to contribute more than 12,000 contacts to
the worldwide event. Eighteen operators aged 25 or younger deployed
special event 1 × 1 call signs — K8Y, K8O, K8T, and K8A — to
promote youth in amateur radio. Fifteen young operators across the US
took turns using these call signs throughout December. They logged
10,474 contacts using those call signs on SSB, CW, digital modes, and
satellites. Some operators also aired the call signs during contests.
Participants in the Americas offered opinions on what made the event
special for them.

“Operating-wise, it was definitely the pileups…I love a good
pileup,” said Mason Matrazzo, KM4SII. “Apart from that, it was great
getting to be part of a group of youngsters that are all into the hobby.
Even though we weren’t physically working together, we all got to be
part of the YOTA program over the air.”

Audrey McElroy, KM4BUN, also cited the on-air camaraderie. “My
favorite part of YOTA month was getting the wonderful experience of
talking to other youth all over the world and sharing our
experiences,” she said. “It gives us hope to know the future of
Amateur Radio is in the hands of these great kids.” Her brother Jack,
KM4ZIA, also took part.

In Canada, David Samu, VE7DZO, signed VE7YOTA in December, making 458
contacts on CW. “My favorite part was seeing all the YOTA stations on
the air throughout December and seeing all the high energy youth
activity,” he said.

Mathias Acevedo, CE2LR, activated XR2YOTA, and met another young
operator from Chile, Manu Pardo, CA3MPR, through YOTA month. Between
them, they put 1,535 contacts into the log on CW, SSB, and digital
modes.

Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO, coordinated the efforts of the 17 participants
and the logs for the US stations. “I learned much during the month
about the importance of teamwork and communication...just like
baseball,” Bryant said about his role as coordinator. “I think YOTA
month was a great success considering the short amount of time we had to
plan this all out. I had a lot of fun operating this event, but it was
even more rewarding to see other youth here in the Americas make tons of
QSOs during December.” Bryant managed Logbook of The World accounts
for the US stations and QRZ.com pages for all call signs, maintained an
operator schedule, worked with YOTA Month Award Manager Tomi Varro,
HA8RT, and reported in to the YOTA Camp Committee in the Americas.

Globally, nearly 129,000 contacts were logged using 48 call signs, all
operated by hams under the age of 25 or younger. More than 2,500
operators of all ages requested and received awards based on the number
of YOTA contacts they had made. Statistics are available.

The first Youth On The Air camp in the US will take place next June 21
– 26 at the National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting in West
Chester Township, Ohio.

For more information about YOTA in the Americas, contact YOTA Month in
the Americas Coordinator Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO, or YOTA in the Americas
Camp Director Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.

New Book from ARRL: Amateur Radio Contesting for Beginners
01/17/2020
Contesting is one of the most exciting aspects of amateur radio — and
for some, it’s their primary ham radio activity. Amateur Radio
Contesting for Beginners by contesting veteran Doug Grant, K1DG, offers
practical information and ideas that will help you to get started in
contesting — “radiosport” — or to build your skills,
if you’re
already active.

Contesting tests station capability and operator skill, and it really is
a sport, with a typical objective of contacting as many stations and
multipliers — ARRL Sections, states, grids, or DXCC entities, for
example — within the contest period.

“Doug Grant has written the ideal guide for anyone interested in
contesting,” said QST Editor Steve Ford, WB8IMY.

Grant’s book explains what equipment you need, typical contest
formats, details of some more popular events, operating techniques, how
to submit an entry, and how to improve your scores. No matter how modest
your station or experience, you can compete, too!

A couple of events over the January 18 – 19 weekend to get you started
include the ARRL January VHF Contest (CW, phone, and digital) and the
North American QSO Party, SSB. See the ARRL Contest Calendar for
information on other events.

Amateur Radio Contesting for Beginners is available from the ARRL Store
or your ARRL Dealer. (ARRL Item no. 1243, ISBN: 978-1-62595-124-3,
$27.95 retail, special ARRL Member Price $24.95). Call 860-594-0355 or,
toll-free in the US, 888-277-5289. It’s also available as an e-book
for the Amazon Kindle.

For more information about ARRL-sponsored contests, including rules and
results, and to view the contest photo gallery visit the ARRL Contests
page.

Barry Shelley, N1VXY, to Become ARRL Interim CEO
01/19/2020
At its meeting this weekend, the ARRL Board of Directors did not elect
Howard Michel, WB2ITX, as the ARRL Chief Executive Officer. Beginning
Monday, January 20, Barry Shelley, N1VXY, will become interim CEO. Mr.
Shelley was ARRL’s Chief Financial Officer for 28 years and CEO during
2018 before his retirement. The board has created a search committee to
select the next CEO. More details on this and other matters which took
place at the board meeting will be released shortly.

ITU Development Sector Publication Highlights Amateur Radio’s Role in
Emergency Communication
01/21/2020
Amateur radio is featured in the publication, ITU Guidelines for
national emergency telecommunication plans, published by the
International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Development Sector (ITU-D).
The publication notes that radio amateurs have supported communication
in emergency situations on a voluntary basis since the dawn of radio.

“They are experts in radio communications and have the equipment,
skills and necessary frequencies allocated by ITU to deploy networks in
emergency events quickly and efficiently,” the publication says. ITU-D
said amateur radio support offers “great coverage due to the large
number of amateur radio stations available;” training programs and
exercises have been developed for emergency communication; “qualified
temporary volunteers who provide skills and experience essential for
emergency telecommunications;” problem-solving skills and an ability
to work with “often very limited resources,” and the ability to work
with alternative power sources.

Past ARRL President and IARU Secretary Rod Stafford, W6ROD, represents
the International Amateur Radio Union at ITU-D meetings. — Thanks to
Southgate Amateur Radio News; IARU

ARRL Events App is Available for Apple iOS and Android Devices
01/21/2020
The ARRL Events app is available to use with Apple iOS and Android
devices. A web-browser version, optimized for most browsers and other
types of mobile devices, is also available. ARRL Events will be featured
at Orlando HamCation 2020, February 7 – 9, which has been sanctioned
as the 2020 ARRL Northern Florida Section Convention.

AMSAT Says its GOLF-TEE Initiative has Met a Major Milestone
01/21/2020
AMSAT reports that an array of GOLF-TEE (Greater Orbit Larger Footprint
– Technology Evaluation Environment) satellite prototype boards
transmitted telemetry for the first time on January 14.

“The boards are laid out on a bench as a ‘flat-sat,’ with
interconnecting wires, bench power supplies, and a dummy load on the
transmitter,” AMSAT said. The interconnected boards include an early
radiation-tolerant internal housekeeping unit (IHU, i.e., computer)
prototype; a control interface prototype, and a set of spare boards from
HuskySat-1 that act as prototypes for the legacy IHU and legacy VHF/UHF
RF components.

“Now that the development team has reached this point, it has RF to
use as a basis for developing a GOLF-TEE decoder for FoxTelem, the
ground telemetry receiver software,” AMSAT said. “Thousands of hours
of work by many AMSAT volunteers have gone into the hardware and
software that got GOLF-TEE this far, with much work yet to be done
before flight units are ready.”

GOLF-TEE is designed as a low-Earth orbit testbed for technologies
necessary for successful CubeSat missions to a wide variety of orbits,
including medium- and high-Earth orbits. AMSAT invited donations to
further the project. It’s also seeking additional volunteers. —
Thanks to AMSAT News Service.

ARRL to Argue for Continued Access to 3-GHz Spectrum as FCC Sets Comment
Deadlines
01/24/2020
At its January meeting, the ARRL Board of Directors instructed the
League’s FCC counsel to prepare a strong response to protect amateur
access to spectrum in the 3 GHz range. In its Notice of Proposed
Rulemaking (NPRM) in WT Docket 19-348, the FCC proposed to relocate all
non-federal operations, including amateur uses, to spectrum outside the
3.3 – 3.55 GHz band. The Commission anticipates auctioning this
spectrum to expand commercial use of 5G cellular and wireless broadband
services, if agreement can be reached on relocation of — or sharing
with — the federal incumbents that operate in the same band.
Publication of the NPRM in the Federal Register on January 22
established deadlines of February 21 for comments and March 23 for reply
comments.

The FCC has requested comment on the uses radio amateurs make of the
spectrum and appropriate relocation options. Complicating matters is the
fact that radio amateurs must consider the possibility that the
immediately adjacent 3.1 – 3.3 GHz band is included in the spectrum
that Congress has identified for similar study. FCC Commissioner Michael
O’Rielly, in a December statement, referenced the fact that the lower
band may also be considered for non-federal reallocation, potentially
limiting relocation possibilities.

Amateurs make substantial use of the 3.3 – 3.5 GHz band that would be
hard to replicate elsewhere, and they have filed more than 150 comments
before the designated comment period even began. Among users looking at
options are those who use this spectrum for Earth-Moon-Earth
(moonbounce) communication, mesh networks, experiments with
communication over long distances, radiosport, and amateur television. A
portion of the band also is designated for use by amateur satellites in
ITU Regions 2 and 3 (the Americas and Asia/Pacific).

A report is due by March 23 from the National Telecommunications and
Information Administration (NTIA) evaluating the feasibility of having
federal users share all or part of the 3.1 – 3.55 GHz band with
commercial wireless services. This report is required by the Making
Opportunities for Broadband Investment and Limiting Excessive and
Needless Obstacles to Wireless (MOBILE NOW) Act. The results of the NTIA
report will impact how much spectrum ultimately may be re-allocated for
auction to wireless providers.

ARRL urges amateurs who comment to inform the FCC about the uses they
make of the 3 GHz spectrum. Short comments and longer statements may be
filed electronically. Visit the FCC “How to Comment on FCC
Proceedings” page for more information. Commenters should reference WT
Docket 19-348.

Swains Island DXpedition Team is Ready to Roll
01/27/2020
The W8S DXpedition team heading to Swains Island in the Pacific in March
reports, “All lights are green.” Team members will leave from home
in early March, and all will convene in Pago Pago, American Samoa, to
board the vessel Manu Atele, which will transport everyone to the atoll.
The voyage will take 24 hours.

Smaller vessels will ferry the operators and equipment to the island at
high tide, which the update called “a serious challenge.” The ship
will not remain offshore while the DXpedition is under way, “hopefully
picking the team up again after 14 days.” An international team of 10
operators will be active from March 10 to March 25 on all HF bands on
CW, SSB, FT8, and RTTY. Operation will be 24/7 from two separate camps
on the island, each with two stations.

Visit the Swains Island 2020 DXpedition website for more information.

New Amateur Extra Question Pool Released
01/27/2020
The new Amateur Extra-class license examination question pool, effective
from July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2024, has been released and is
available at the National Conference of Volunteer Coordinators (NCVEC)
website.

The 2020 – 2024 Extra-class pool incorporates significant changes
compared to the current 2016 – 2020 question pool, which expires on
June 30. The number of questions in the pool was reduced from 712 to
622. The result was 239 modified questions, 49 new questions, and 139
questions removed due to changes in what was felt to be an abundance of
outdated questions, while areas of new technology and subjects were
added.

In addition, an effort was made to balance the difficulty level,
removing or replacing some questions deemed too easy or too difficult
compared to the rest of the pool. The 2020 pool has 10 diagrams, which
have been renumbered because the new question pool has two fewer than
the 2016 question pool.

State QSO Party Challenge Announced
01/28/2020
The State QSO Party Challenge is a competition comprised of other
contests, namely state and provincial QSO parties. As explained on the
website, the annual cumulative score program is open to any radio
amateur who participates in any approved state QSO parties (SQPs).

Participants just need to submit their QSO party scores to
3830scores.com to enter the challenge. Participants’ cumulative scores
will be calculated by totaling up the number of reported contacts and
multiplying by the number of SQPs entered in the year to date. Periodic
standings will be posted to 3830scores.com, the QSOParty Groups.io
forum, and the StateQSOParty.com website.

“Using the number of QSO parties entered as a multiplier is expected
to encourage radio amateurs to enter more state/province QSO parties,”
the program’s organizers said. “The first SQPs in 2020 are the
Vermont, Minnesota, and British Columbia QSO Parties in the first
weekend of February.”

Entrants must make at least two contacts in a QSO party for it to count
as a multiplier. Full details are available on the State QSO Party
Challenge website. Challenge sponsors expressed appreciation to Bruce
Horn, WA7BNM, for developing the SQP Activity Tracker on
3830scores.com.

ARRL Expands its Roster of Online Discussion Groups
01/29/2020
ARRL’s Committee on Communication with Members has launched three new
online discussion forums as part of its ongoing efforts to enhance and
improve communication between ARRL leadership and members or prospective
members. The new forums, which focus on antenna law, regulatory issues,
and support for new amateur radio licensees, will go live on Thursday,
January 30, at 0400 UTC.

The committee launched the three new discussion groups on the basis of
requests from the amateur radio community, to support ARRL’s efforts
to provide more resources for  beginner-to-intermediate operators.

The online discussion program launched last fall with three forums —
contesting, awards, and the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) —
all open to the amateur radio community. The program was based on the
success of the online ARRL-LoTW Group, which, for the past several
years, has served to answer questions and generate discussions about
ways to improve the service.

ARRL New England Division Director and attorney Fred Hopengarten, K1VR,
will moderate the Antenna Law and Policy Forum. Hopengarten is the
author of Antenna Zoning for the Radio Amateur.
ARRL Regulatory Affairs Manager Dan Henderson, N1ND, will moderate the
Regulatory Affairs forum.
QST Editor and ARRL Publications Manager Steve Ford, WB8IMY, will
moderate the New Hams forum. 
ARRL IT Manager Michael Keane, K1MK, worked with Groups.io to set up the
new groups. Those wishing to subscribe must use a Groups.io username and
password, if they have one, or create a Groups.io account if they
don’t.

The new groups join an ARRL discussion forum lineup that already
includes:

ARRL-Contesting, moderated by ARRL Contest Advisory Committee Chairman
Dennis Egan, W1UE.
ARRL-Awards, moderated by ARRL Radiosport and Field Services Manager
Bart Jahnke, W9JJ.
ARRL-IARU, moderated by IARU Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ.
ARRL-LOTW, moderated by ARRL IT Manager Michael Keane, K1MK.
Everyone who subscribes to an ARRL Group is automatically subscribed to
“ARRL Groups,” an administrative feature that allows ARRL to convey
routine announcements to subscribers of all ARRL groups, such as planned
system outages.

ARRL expects to create additional online groups that focus on other
areas of interest to radio amateurs, including ARRL activities,
services, initiatives, and policies.

ARRL currently hosts some “members-only” online forums that include
the topics of Awards and Contesting. While these forums will continue to
operate, participants are being encouraged to post new topics in the new
Groups.

All questions will be welcome, no matter how many times they have
already been asked and answered, or how obvious the answers might be.
Neither personal attacks nor foul language will be tolerated. Violators
will immediately be placed on “moderated” status, meaning their
subsequent posts will require Moderator approval. Civility and courtesy
are expected, even when disagreeing.

The Committee believes that providing more opportunities for two-way
discussion between the organization’s leaders and the entire ham radio
community will assist ARRL in truly serving the needs of this community.
— Thanks to ARRL Communications Manager Dave Isgur, N1RSN

Foundation for Amateur Radio Invites 2020 – 2021 Academic Year
Scholarship Applications
01/29/2020
The Foundation for Amateur Radio Inc. (FAR) has invited applications for
the 2020 – 2021 academic year for the scholarships it administers.
Applications must be submitted via the online form. Several questions
ask for essay responses. The deadline for initial submissions is April
30, 2020. Applicants may amend their applications until May 7.

All applicants must hold a valid amateur radio license and be enrolled
or accepted for enrollment at an accredited university, college, or
technical school. Applicants attending school outside the US must
provide a brochure describing the school. Students do not apply for
specific scholarships; each application will be considered for all of
the scholarships for which the applicant is qualified. QCWA scholarships
and the Chichester Memorial Scholarship all require recommendations to
be awarded. Data entered onto the application goes directly into an
encrypted, password-protected PDF file available only to the review
committee. No part of the application is stored online.

More information is available on the FAR website.

ARRL Board of Directors Re-Elects President Rick Roderick, K5UR
02/10/2020
Meeting January 17 – 18 in Windsor, Connecticut, the ARRL Board of
Directors re-elected ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, to a third
2-year term. Roderick outpolled the only other nominee, Pacific Division
Director Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT, 8 – 7. New England Division Vice
Director Mike Raisbeck, K1TWF, was elected First Vice President,
succeeding Greg Widin, K0GW, who did not seek another term. Raisbeck was
the sole nominee. A successor will be appointed to fill the Vice
Director seat that Raisbeck has vacated. Bob Vallio, W6RGG, was
re-elected as Second Vice President as the only nominee.
On a 9 – 6 vote, the Board voted not to re-elect Howard Michel,
WB2ITX, as Chief Executive Officer. Michel was in the post for 15
months. Former ARRL Chief Financial Officer and Chief Executive Officer
Barry Shelley, N1VXY, has come out of retirement to serve as interim
ARRL CEO. He also was elected as Secretary. Shelley was ARRL’s CFO for
28 years and served as CEO during 2018 before his retirement, following
the departure of former CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF. The ARRL Board has
appointed a committee to spearhead the search for a new CEO. That panel
will screen suitable CEO candidates, presenting three to the Board for
consideration. 
Former ARRL President and IARU Secretary Rod Stafford, W6ROD, was
elected International Affairs Vice President, succeeding Jay Bellows,
K0QB, who did not seek another term. Also re-elected by the Board were
Treasurer Rick Niswander, K7GM, and Chief Financial Officer Diane
Middleton, W2DLM.
Elected as members of the Executive Committee were Atlantic Division
Director Tom Abernethy, W3TOM; Central Division Director Kermit Carlson,
W9XA; Roanoke Division Director Bud Hippisley, W2RU; New England
Division Director Fred Hopengarten, K1VR, and Great Lakes Division
Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK. The Executive Committee addresses and
makes decisions regarding ARRL business that may arise between scheduled
Board meetings.
Hudson Division Director Ria Jairam, N2RJ, was elected as a member of
the ARRL Foundation Board for a 3-year term. Tim Duffy, K3LR, and Jim
Fenstermaker, K9JF, were elected to the Foundation Board for 3-year
terms as non-ARRL Board members.
Relief from Private Land-Use Restrictions
The Ad Hoc Legislative Advocacy Committee provided the Board with drafts
outlining three legislative approaches to address relief for radio
amateurs facing private land-use restrictions impacting outdoor
antennas. The Board signed off on the draft legislative approaches “as
presented and possibly modified” and directed the committee “to
proceed to obtain congressional sponsorship, employing any of these
three approaches and using its best judgment on any alterations or
modifications that our advisors or sponsors may require or suggest.”
HF Band Planning
Outgoing chair of the HF Band Planning Committee Greg Widin, K0GW,
presented the panel’s report and entertained questions. Board members
noted that staff turnover and funding limitations at the FCC might
impact ARRL’s efforts to tweak the bands. The Board agreed that ARRL
would post the report and solicit comments from members on it.
Contests and Operating Awards
The Board approved raising the maximum number of contacts a Field Day
GOTA station can make to 1,000. It amended the ARRL RTTY Roundup rules
to add Multi-Two and Multi-Multi categories and to permit multioperator
stations to operate for the entire contest period, and it divided entry
categories into RTTY only, Digital only (i.e., no RTTY), and Mixed (both
RTTY and digital).
Matt Holden, K0BBC, presented the DX Advisory Committee report, telling
the Board that the panel engaged in extensive discussion on a proposal
to change the 5-Band DXCC award from the current required bands to offer
credit for any five bands. The committee unanimously rejected the
proposal.
ARRL Elections
The Board revised rules governing ARRL Division and Section Manager
elections to clarify some terminology, to extend the campaign period
from the call for nominations to the deadline for ballots received, and
to make other miscellaneous changes. Revisions will become effective by
February 15, 2020.
In the interest of “openness and fairness,” the Board also approved
a measure that would offers candidates and members an opportunity to be
present during the counting of ballots. Candidates also may designate
one ARRL member to attend as a surrogate if they’re unable to observe
ballot counting, or to accompany them at the count. The Board further
approved an amendment to permit ARRL members, upon petition, to travel
at their own expense to witness the counting of ballots from their
Division.
The Board charged the Programs and Services Committee to consider
changes to the ARRL By-Laws that would give members, upon petition, the
opportunity to attend the public portion of the Annual Meeting in
January. The number of members permitted to attend would be subject to
available space and fire code regulations.
Public Service Enhancement Working Group Chair, Roanoke Division
Director Bud Hippisley, W2RU, reported that with field adoption of the
2019 ARES Plan now under way, the group is putting increased focus on
the National Traffic System, including plans for dialog with
representatives of Radio Relay International.
Reduced Dues for Younger Applicants
The Board approved an amendment giving the CEO discretion to raise the
eligibility age for reduced full ARRL membership dues from 22 to 26,
provided the rate not be less than one-half of the established rate. In
addition, the Board approved the establishment of a reduced-rate,
revenue-neutral Life Membership for individuals age 70 or older, with
cumulative annual membership of 25 years or more, at an initial rate of
$750. Headquarters staff will work out the administrative details of the
program, subject to approval of the Administration and Finance
Committee.
The Board also agreed to allow for a “digital-only” access
membership, at the discretion of the CEO, discounted no more than 10%
from the established dues rate.
Other Business
In other business, the Board: 
•	approved a grant of $500 to the Youth on the Air (YOTA) in the
Americas program, which is sponsoring a camp in June for young radio
amateurs. Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, a former ARRL Youth Coordinator, is heading
the initiative, which is funded through the non-profit Electronic
Applications Radio Service Inc. 
•	authorized creation of an Emergency Management Director Selection
Committee, with its chair and members to be named by the president. 
The minutes of the January Annual Meeting of the ARRL Board of Directors
are posted on the ARRL website.

Mississippi ARES® Emergency Coordinator Credits Training for Effective
Tornado Response
02/21/2020
Amateur Radio Emergency Service® (ARES®) volunteers in DeSoto County,
Mississippi, devoted several days in January to assisting local
emergency managers in responding to tornado damage in the region. Desoto
County Emergency Coordinator Ricky Chambers, KF5WVJ; Assistant EC Gene
Adams, KF5KVL; Tate County EC Brad Kerley, KG5TTU, and Andy Luscomb,
AG5FG, reported at 3 AM on January 11 to the DeSoto County Emergency
Operations Center (EOC) to open a SKYWARN weather watch. After a tornado
warning was issued for DeSoto County, Chambers activated an emergency
net on a local repeater. Ten minutes into the net, however, the repeater
went down, and the net switched to simplex. The net subsequently moved
to another operational repeater.
Initial reports of downed trees blocking roadways and an eyewitness
report of a possible tornado southwest of Hernando came in just after 5
AM. The ARES team at the EOC began taking damage reports, answering the
telephone, and monitoring and taking calls from public safety
dispatchers. When the deputy EMA director requested traffic control in
Lewisburg, three of the ARES volunteers accompanied EMA director Chris
Olson to Lewisburg. Chambers and Kerley assumed traffic control, and
Olson asked that Chambers put out a call for ARES/RACES volunteers and
EMA reservists to report to the EOC. The ham radio volunteers also
handled welfare checks.
A dozen ARES/RACES and EMA reservists returned the next day to conduct
door-to-door damage assessment. For the next 10 days, Chambers reported,
the DeSoto County volunteers assisted in handling telephone traffic in
the EOC, freeing up first responders to do their primary jobs.
“I attribute our effective response to the training we have conducted
on a monthly basis,” Chambers said, noting that training included
recommended ARRL courses. “We were able to see how the Incident
Command System worked on a first-hand basis as the incident unfolded,
based on the ICS training courses we have taken. My group went from 0 to
110 MPH in seconds, never missing a beat [and] everyone performed on a
professional level.” — Thanks to DeSoto County and EMA Reservist
Coordinator EC Ricky Chambers, KF5WVJ

ARRL Opposes FCC Plan to Delete the 3.4 GHz Band
02/25/2020
ARRL has filed comments opposing an FCC proposal to delete the 3.3 –
3.5 GHz secondary amateur allocation. The comments, filed on February
21, are in response to an FCC Notice of Proposed Rulemaking () in WT
Docket 19-348 in which the FCC put forward a plan to remove “existing
non-federal secondary radiolocation and amateur allocations” in the
3.3 – 3.55 GHz band and relocate incumbent non-federal operations. The
FCC’s proposal was in response to the MOBILE NOW [Making Opportunities
for Broadband Investment and Limiting Excessive and Needless Obstacles
to Wireless] Act, enacted in 2018 to make new spectrum available for
mobile and fixed wireless broadband use. ARRL noted that amateur radio
has a long history of successful coexistence with primary users of the
band.
“There is no reason suggested by the Commission, or known to us, why
the secondary status for amateur radio operations should not be
continued for the indefinite future,” ARRL said in its comments. “We
understand that secondary commercial users are less flexible than
amateur radio users and may desire to relocate to protect continued
provision of services and service quality. Radio amateurs, by contrast,
benefit from having technical knowledge and no customer demands for
continuous service quality, more flexibility to make adjustments, and
often have the technical abilities necessary to design and implement the
means to coexist compatibly with the signals of primary users.”
ARRL pointed to amateur radio’s “decades-long experience observing
and experimenting with radiowave propagation” in the 3.3 – 3.5 GHz
band that includes mesh networks, amateur television networks, weak
signal long-distance communication, Earth-Moon-Earth (moonbounce)
communication, beacons used for propagation study, and amateur satellite
communications. In its comments, ARRL argued that it would be
“premature” to remove the current secondary amateur radio
allocation.
“This spectrum should not be removed from the amateur radio secondary
allocation and left unused,” ARRL told the FCC. “Only at a later
time may an informed assessment of sharing opportunities be made in the
specific spectrum slated for re-allocation…. This depends upon the
Congressionally-mandated NTIA studies of sharing or relocation options
that have yet to be completed and, if all or part of this spectrum is
re-allocated, the nature and location of buildout by the non-federal
users.” The NTIA oversees spectrum allocated to federal government
users. ARRL noted that radio amateurs have established extensive
infrastructure for the current band and are engaged in construction and
experimentation that includes innovative “mesh networks” and amateur
television networks that can be deployed to support public service
activities.
With the NTIA report addressing the 3.1 – 3.55 GHz spectrum not
expected until late March, ARRL said, “we do not yet know how much
spectrum below and above the amateur secondary allocation may be
reallocated to non-federal users and what opportunities may exist or be
developed to share [that] spectrum” with new primary users and
systems.
“Even if suitable new spectrum could be found for the existing amateur
uses — which is difficult before the spectrum musical chairs activity
is concluded — the costs to radio amateurs would be significant and be
borne with no countervailing public benefit,” ARRL told the FCC.
“If the advent of new primary licensees forecloses some types of
secondary operations, the amateur community will reevaluate the
situation when some certainty exists,” ARRL concluded.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FROM AROUND THE LOUISIANA SECTION:
ARES Monthly Section Emergency Coordinators Report
December 2019
1. ARRL Section:  Louisiana
2. Month:  December
3. Year:  2019
4. Total number of ARES members:  428
5. Number of DECs/ECs reporting this month:  9
6. Number of ARES nets active:  48
7. Number of nets with NTS liaison:  5
8. Calls of DECs/EC reporting:  W4NDF KD5MLD KD5BNH KE5BMS AG5LR KD5DFL
W5GAS KD5IGZ KE5GMN 
 9a. Number of exercises & training sessions this month:  42  
  9b.  Person hours:  385
10a. Number of public service events this month:  1     10b. Person
hours:  12
11a. Number of emergency operations this month:  4   
11b. Person hours:  100 
12a. Number of SKYWARN operations this month:  5 
 12b. Person hours:  112
13a. Auto Sum 9a, 10a, 11a, 12a:  52
 13b. Auto Sum 9b,
        10b, 11b, 12b:  609
Submitted by Jim Coleman, AI5B
ARRL ARES 
Section Emergency Coordinator

ARES Monthly Section Emergency Coordinators Report
January 2020
1. ARRL Section:  Louisiana
2. Month:  Janaury
3. Year: 2020
4. Total number of ARES members:  427
5. Number of DECs/ECs reporting this month:  9
6. Number of ARES nets active:  54
7. Number of nets with NTS liaison:  3
8. Calls of DECs/EC reporting:  
W4NDF KD5MLD KD5BNH KE5BMS AG5LR KD5DFL W5GAS KD5IGZ KE5GMN
 9a. Number of exercises & training sessions this month:  39      
  9b.  Person hours:  535
10a. Number of public service events this month:  13    10b. Person
hours:  92
11a. Number of emergency operations this month:  1   
11b. Person hours:  18 
12a. Number of SKYWARN operations this month:  3 
 12b. Person hours:  80 
13a. Auto Sum 9a, 10a, 11a, 12a:  56
 13b. Auto Sum 9b,
        10b, 11b, 12b:  725
Submitted by Jim Coleman, SAI5B
ARRL ARES
Section Emergency Coordinator
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Louisiana Traffic Net Manager’s Report
December 2019

 Sessions QNI QTC QTR
17.            418 44.   393

January 2020
Sessions QNI QTC QTR
16             342 31.   467


73,
Jimmy Lewis/AB5YS
Louisiana Section Traffic Manager
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
REGION 2:
As always, the Ascension Airwaves has an AWESOME Newsletter for
February:
http://k5arc.org/main/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/Feb-20-AA1.pdf

REGION 4:
From: Volume 60, Number 02 ACADIANA AMATEUR RADIO ASSOC., INC. - a
501(c)3 Corporation February 2020

60th Annual 2020 AARA Hamfest Each year the AARA hosts it's annual
Hamfest to support club activities as well as the purchase and
maintenance of club equipment. The upcoming 2020 Hamfest will be held
March 13 - 14, 2020 at the Rayne Civic Center in Rayne, LA. The event
will be open to the public from 3:00 PM until 8:00 PM on Friday. It will
reopen to the public from 8:00 AM until 3:00 PM on Saturday. Plenty of
good food will be available on site. Boiled crawfish will be served at
6:00 PM on Friday but pre-registration is required. Pre-registration
forms are available at the w5ddl.org website Preregistration form
Additional information regarding vendors, prizes, forums, etc will be
posted on this website once that information becomes available.

VE Test Session January 2, 2020 73, de Greg ~ K5LFT Started off the year
pretty good. One new Tech & one upgrade to Amateur Extra. The candidates
were Hailey R. Doucet ~KI5HTC ~ of New Iberia (Tech) & Bradley K.
Vincent ~KG5KZR ~ of Gueydan (KG5KZR) upgraded to Amateur Extra. The VEs
helping out were: Greg ~ K5LFT, Dave ~ N4ELM, Archie ~ W5AG, Michael ~
KI5ARX, & a new Ve Raymond Costilla ~ N5KIR. Congratulations to the
testees & a great big thank you to the VEs in attendance......

What is a Net? By Joseph “Moe” Meaux K2JDM 
When someone first gets into the Ham radio hobby, one of the first
questions they may ask is “What is a net?” The general definition of
a Net (or Network) “is to allow people to be helpful to each other
professionally, particularly in finding a better job, or moving to a
higher position” doesn’t exactly apply to the Ham radio hobby. It
is
close! A Net in Ham radio is a gathering of people used to share
information and to train in proper radio etiquette or protocols. Most
radio nets are held at a regular scheduled time and frequency. There are
two formats of any net; Formal and Informal. A FORMAL NET has one
operator that is in control for maintaining order on the net, “making
sure that traffic is passed in a timely manner and that more than one
person doesn’t talk at the same time”. The operators in the field
must first ask permission to talk typically by giving their callsign
only. The net control station will acknowledge that they have traffic
and give them permission to pass said traffic or to tell that person to
standby if there is higher priority traffic that needs to be passed
first. Once the field operator has finished with whatever traffic they
need to pass, they will clear with their callsign per FCC regulations.
The net control station will then log the information and/or pass the
traffic to where it needs to go to. Formal nets are often more efficient
than informal ones because someone is basically directing traffic.
INFORMAL NETS still have a net control station, but they do not control
the flow of traffic. Instead, they keep a log of traffic and stand by in
case something major happens and the net needs to be changed to a formal
net forum. This format allows field operators to call other field
operators without having to ask permission first. This type of net is
often used when it is not really important to have an organized flow of
traffic. An example of this informal net would be if the local skywarn
team sees that there is a major storm coming but is still a little ways
away from the area. This allows the field operators to get to their
spots before the storm makes your area to allow as much coverage as
needed. Once the storm gets closer, the net can change to a formal
style. What types of nets are there? Well, there are several types. One
of the most common is the SKYWARN Net. This is storm spotting in a
formal format and in conjunction with the National Weather Service and
your local Emergency Management Office. These are only activated by the
NWS or your local EMC. Hams will be activated and meet on a
predetermined frequency and will “watch” the storm as it comes into
your area, passing on what they see to the net control so the
information can be in turn relayed to the nearest NWS office. SKYWARN
personal are very important to the NWS because after a couple of miles
from their radar station, it can not see below about 10,000 feet.
Spotter on the ground have to fill in the blanks for the meteorologists
the NWS office. Information and/or Training Nets is also a common net.
These are typically done in a formal format to help train operators how
to operate during a net, how to pass traffic, or just give news of
upcoming events. They are usually done as club nets on a VHF or UHF
repeater, at a scheduled time and frequency. This type is good to get a
new ham over their fear of talking over a radio. Rag Chew Nets are
typically done in a semi-formal or informal format. These types are held
on HF and sometimes on UHF or VHF. These are usually done when a bunch
of people come together at the same time and same frequency to talk
about there day, what they are doing, or just general discussions. SWAP
Nets are used to buy or sell equipment. Well, per the FCC regulations,
you can not actually conduct business on the air, you can say what you
have that you want to sell, the price you are looking for, and the phone
number where they can contact you. You can not negotiate prices or talk
about the price on the net or on any over the air frequencies. These
nets are semiformal. RACES and ARES Nets are both formal nets used
during and after a natural disaster or a large scale event. A RACES Net
is used during the actual emergency event, while the ARES Net is used
after the emergency event. The ARES Net operators will typically do
things like search and rescue, damage assessments, clean up, etc. More
information on these two types of nets can be found at the ARRL.org
website. ARRL.org ARES / RACES FAQ As you can see both formal and
informal nets are used in a wide variety of types of nets, and can be
interchanged at a moments notice to help facilitate the amount of
traffic.

Slidell EOC Hamfest, 7/24-25/2020 in the New Slidell Auditorium 
My name is David Hartley (K5OZ) and I am the 2020 Ozone Amateur Radio
Club (OARC) Hamfest coordinator. Our Club is located in Slidell,
Louisiana 25 miles northeast of downtown New Orleans (w5sla.net). This
year’s Hamfest will again be a big one; we will be combined the second
year in a row with the W9DYV Vintage Radio Symposium
(www.cemultiphase.com). Last year our event combination drew over 500
hams and this year we expect it to be more than 1000 because we have
located the symposium/forums in the same building as our hamfest. This
building is the new Slidell Auditorium and features Forum Rooms and over
10,000 square feet of trading space. In addition, Slidell offers a great
tourist spot to see New Orleans and other local area attractions while
you are here. We would love to have your company join us as a Hamfest
vendor July 24-25, 2020. This year we are considering a one and one half
day hamfest because our symposium is a full two days; i.e., 1) on Friday
we will have vendor setup from 8:00 am to 2:00 pm, 2) Flea market setup
from 12 to 2 pm and 3) doors opening at 2:00pm to 5:00pm for
Symposium/Hamfest attendees and Saturday 8:00 am to 2:00 pm for all
attendees. Tear down will be from 2:00pm to 5:00pm Saturday afternoon.
Let us know your thoughts on this day and one half idea. The attached
file shows the layout for the vendors and flea market tables. Please
save the date and get your request in early via my email below. The
vendor tables (blue) along the walls are 3’ x 8’ and are $15 each.
Flea market tables (Green) are $10 each. Thank you for your amateur
products and please consider participating in our Hamfest in Slidell, LA
this year. Please let us know as soon as possible so we can advertise
your attendance on our flyers. David E. Hartley, K5OZ
dehartley@charter.net 985-707-8010.

Milam Columbus "Lucky' Young KA5SUR – SK Lucky Young KA5SUR KA5SUR,
92, a resident of Sulphur passed away January 19, 2020 after a short
illness. He was born May 13, 1927 in Kenedy, Texas. Graduated from South
Park High School, Beaumont, Texas in 1945. Joined U S Navy in 1945 and
served honorable in WW II and continued in the navy reserves until 1987
retiring after 42 years of service.

AARA Monthly Meeting Presentation Topics In the January 2020 meeting, we
had great discussion on the continuation of a monthly training topic.
Many ideas were presented, and I was able to capture all of the ideas
put on the table. I am excited to see what our members will bring to the
meeting as the Q4 meetings of 2019 were a big hit. I am certain that the
demonstrations on the Raspberry Pi and Batteries eased the frustration
of some and opened an avenue for others. With that said, I will list the
topics that were brought up and a suggested name on each topic. As you
read through the list, please reply to me stating whether or not you
would be willing and/or able to present on the topic. This will allow us
to build a schedule for the 2020 year and we can make reservations on
the agenda. 1. Grounding – Fred Marshall 2. Contesting – Scotty
Menard/Charlie Morrison 3. Different types of coax and their application
– Dave Redfern 4. Solar Panels – Fred Marshall 5. Traffic
Generation
and relaying that information – (OPEN) 6. Winlink – Glen
Thibodeaux
7. Antenna Building – (OPEN) This can take on so many roles from
Dipoles, to J-Poles, to Emergency Communications. 8. Soldering (Possible
conflict with LSM policy – Paul McCasland to check) 9. Radio Etiquette
– (Chris Ancelet – February Topic) 10. Antenna Q&A – (Dave
Redfern) 11. How to build a J-Pole – (Danny Daigle – Possible
Summer
Field Day Project) 12. How to Build a Home brew Yagi for 2m – (OPEN)
13. SDR Radio – (OPEN) 14. 3D Printing – (Paul McCasland) So, with
the list, we have over a year’s worth of topics that could potentially
be presented in our monthly sessions. I am looking forward to seeing who
will step up to the plate and share their knowledge. If there are any
additional topics you would like to see on this list, please feel free
to send me an email or bring it up at one of our next meetings. Chris
Ancelet N5MCY

No-Bake Lemon Icebox Pie 1 Graham Cracker pie shell 8 oz cream cheese
– softened 1 can (14 oz) sweetened condensed milk ½ cup lemon juice 1
Tsp grated lemon peel – optional Chill pie crust about 1 hour. In
large bowl, beat Filling ingredients until smooth. Spread evenly in
crust. Refrigerate 4 hours but no longer than 8 hours. Serve with
whipped topping


REGION 6:
Winter Field Day 2020
This has been one of the better Winter Field Days that our club has
seen.  The turnout was great, the food was delicious and the friendship
was boundless.
 
We set up multiple dipole antennas as well as the triband beam for 10,
15 and 20.
 
The bands did not cooperate with us.  20 and 40 were open a little
during the day and 40 and 80 a little at night.  The morse code
operators had better luck than the voice operators.
 
It rained off and on from Friday afternoon through shut down on Sunday. 
This did not slow us down a bit.
 
We discovered shortly after setting up that we were missing a box of
supplies.  The box is plastic and translucent.  It has headphones,
jumpers, a bandpass filter (missing from pelican case), and many other
supplies.
Thanks to everyone who supplied food, radios, and hard manual labor. 
Special thanks to Kevin/ and Chris/KI5HDW for helping with the login
software (N3FJP) and logging.
Our score is 7322 for Winter Field Day. 2166 points for contacts—159
morse and 43 phone contacts.
Bonus points:  1500 for generator power, 1500 for setting up away from
home, and 1500 for SOAPBOX
Bonus of 3000 (for entering information to Winter Field Day group?)
We are already set up for summer field day 2020 at the same location at
the Wildlife and Fisheries Education Building in Woodworth, Louisiana.
Scott, KD5DFL

From: The Brass Key    
February 2020 
A Publication of the Central Louisiana Amateur Radio Club
 
Prior to the conclusion of Winter Field Day, I was at a bit of a loss
for this month’s column, but 
on the way home from the event, the content of the column became clear.

Winter Field Day, 2020, was a success.  Members came to the event and
brought radios, 
antennas, ancillary accessories, tools, supplies, food, and drinks. 
Members participated in the 
assembly of four stations on Friday and Saturday.  Members got on the
air.  Members had a 
great supper on Saturday evening, complete with some outstanding
desserts, all prepared by 
members.  Members participated in the disassembly of four stations on
Sunday and “field-
dayed” the site.  In Marine Corps jargon, the term field day is often
used as a verb and means ‘to 
clean a site, stow equipment, make it spotless etc.  Members had fun at
the event, and members 
made it a success. 
Band conditions were abysmal.  Forty and eighty meters died completely
in the wee hours of 
Sunday morning and they weren’t much to brag on even when they were
open.  They came 
back for a while on Sunday morning, and twenty meters opened to an
extent on Sunday 
morning.  Unlike the case in previous Field Day and Winter Field Day
events, fifteen meters 
never showed its face, ten meters likewise. 
Although I didn’t conduct a formal census, I believe about ten members
stayed at the site for 
the duration of the event.  Some took advantage of the sleeping
accommodations in the rear of 
the building. 
We had good participation for installation of antennas and assembly of
stations on Friday and 
Saturday.  Except for an hour or so beginning around 03:00 local time on
Sunday, members 
persevered and stayed on the air for the duration of the event despite
the dismal band 
conditions.   
The disassembly of stations and field-day of the site on Sunday after
1:00 PM local time was a 
particular success.  All of those who were on site for the duration and
those who returned to 
the site for this effort participated and contributed.  These members
knew what had to be done, 
and they got it done.  The mobile command unit was cleaned, equipment
was stowed, the 
generator was shut down properly, and all switches were left in the
proper positions as 
instructed by the representative of the Rapides Parish Sheriff’s
Office.  The kitchen, dining, and 
operation areas were cleaned well, trash was taken to the dumpster,
floors were cleaned, and 
furniture was restored to the configuration in which it was found.  The
requirement for use of 
these facilities was to leave them as we found them, and club members
made that happen. 
ARRL Field Day, 2020, is June 27 and 28.  Mark your calendar. 
 
Good DX and 73! 
John N5CM
Many thanks to our president, John, N5CM, our field day coordinator,
Scott, 
KD5DFL,  all those who helped with set-up and take down, Jack W5ETL for

creating the masterpiece gumbo, all those who contributed to the gumbo 
supper, and especially all those hams who came out to operate!   It was

nice to see so many new faces!   Everyone made this field day one of our

best ever!    
We thank the LDWF for the use of their facility, and the RPSO for the
use of 
their mobile command post again this field day.  The generosity of both
of 
these agancies continues to help CLARC to better its operating skills. 
Additional photos of the Field Day can be viewed at the link below. 
Scott KD5DFL Photos: 
https://photos.app.goo.gl/jcojSNLUG5RUPpxE6 
Kevin, KG5SGI Photos:    
https://photos.app.goo.gl/ZkYwM9rYGfuHn9Cc8 

•	**  March 3 - CLARC Meeting - SKYWARN Certification Class -  NWS
Meteorologist 
Roger Ericson.  Location: Kees park Community Center, Pineville.  Doors
will open at 
•	
5:30 PM for VE Testing and fellowship.  There will be no Board or
business meeting 
tonight. 
Class will start at 6:00 PM. 
  
**  April 4 - 5 - LOUISIANA QSO Party - The 2020 edition of the
Louisiana QSO Party 
will run from 14:00 UTC, April 4, 2020 to 02:00 UTC, April 5, 2020 (9:00
AM to 9:00 PM 
CDT Saturday, April 4, 2020).  For further info, see: http://laqp.org/ 
 
**  May 5 - CLARC Meeting - Advanced Skywarn Certification Class - This
is the 
Advanced Class for those who took the Basic Class in March - NWS
Meteorolgist 
Roger Ericson.  Location: Kees park Community Center, Pineville.  Doors
will open at 
5:30 PM for VE Testing and fellowship.  There will be no Board or
business meeting 
tonight.  Class will begin at 6:00 PM. 

From: The Brass Key 
March 2020
A Publication of the Central Louisiana Amateur Radio Club
Given the severe weather events we’ve experienced during the past few
months, the program at the March meeting, SkyWarn Basic Storm Spotter
Training, is very appropriate. By serving as trained spotters during
severe weather events, we serve our respective communities as well as
our fellow club members. This service to our communities provides a
means to fulfill a portion of the basis and purpose for the Amateur
Radio Service, “Recognition and enhancement of the value of the
amateur service to the public as a voluntary noncommercial communication
service, particularly with respect to providing emergency
communications.” Our communities provide for the Central Louisiana
Amateur Radio Club (CLARC). For example, most of our repeater sites are
provided by a local government entity as is our monthly meeting site,
and the site for our last Field Day and Winter Field Day. In each case,
space and utilities are provided by the community at no cost to CLARC;
therefore, it is only fitting that we train and use our unique
capabilities to give back to the community. Perhaps we could look at
opportunities, in addition to SkyWarn, to use our communication
capabilities and equipment to give back to the communities that support
us. Foot races, triathlons, bike rides, festivals etc. could be venues
where our talents, skill, abilities, and equipment could be used not
only to serve the community but also to highlight amateur radio and
CLARC. Think about it. Scott, KD5DFL, investigated CLARC’s status as
an “inactive” ARRL Affiliated Club. He made appropriate contacts,
and our affiliation is back to “active” status. Thank you, Scott!
Kudos to Josh, KI5DDA, for calling the Sunday evening ARES net. I admire
his courage and determination to step into this new role. Young people
such as Josh are the future of amateur radio and our club. Well done,
Josh! ARRL Field Day, 2020, is June 27 and 28. Mark your calendar. 
73 and good DX! John, N5CM

NOTICE OF MARCH 3 MEETING LOCATION CHANGE!!! March 3 - CLARC Meeting -
SKYWARN Certification Class - Due to a scheduling conflict at Kees Park
. . . the March meeting location has changed to: Pineville Main Street
Community Center, 708 Main Street, Pineville. NOTE: VE testing will
begin at 5:00 PM due to the Skywarn class start time. There will be no
club business meeting tonight. Skywarn Class will start at 6:00 PM.


REGION 9:
From:  The SELARC "Hamster"
________________________________________
*Serving Amateur Radio Since 1974*
Published Monthly by the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club Inc.
Visit our website: www.selarc.org
Vol. 47, No. 2 ......................... February 2020

SELARC 2020 Hamfest
The SELARC 39th Annual Hammond Hamfest was held on Saturday January 18,
2020; thanks to all those who sold tickets and participated in the
event. The results of the main prize drawing are shown below:
o	1st Prize: Yaesu FT-450D — Lyle Wales–KD5JRY
o	2nd Prize: Yaesu FTM-400XDR — John Beicher–KF5OPB
o	3rd Prize: AA-230 Zoom Antennae Analyzer — Ralph Shaw–K5CAV
o	4th Prize: Yaesu FT-70DR — Bob–WB5FBS
 
Special Events, Other Hamfests & VE Sessions
60th Annual Acadiana Hamfest 2020 - http://www.w5ddl.org/hamfest.htm
2020 ARRL Field Day - June 27-28, 2020
Hammond VE Group - ARRL/W5YI tests are scheduled for the last Sunday of
each month [with the exception of holiday conflicts] in Room "B" of the
North Oaks Medical System Diagnostic Center at 2pm with $15 testing fee.
Bring photo ID and any appropriate CSCE. For more information contact
n5xes@arrl.net or Find an Amateur Radio License Exam in Your Area.
Happy Birthday
Birthday Wishes for February go out to - John Guthans AA5UY, Pat KE5KMM,
David N5QOX, and Lyle KD5JRY
If we missed your birthday, then please let us know.
Get Well Soon —
Best wishes for continued recuperation go to SELARC members Tom Simpson
N5HAY and Homer Jones KA5TRT. We look forward to hearing you on the
air!
VE Session Results
Congratulations to the following new Amateur Radio Operators and
upgrades!!
18 Jan 2020 - Hammond Hamfest - Hammond VE Group
Technician
Billy Orehowsky / KI5HZE - Saucier, Ms.
Adam Permenter / KI5HZD - Clinton, La.
Devin Martin - Greenwell Springs, La.
General
Randall Davis / KF5TEW - Picayune, Ms.
Extra
Charles Freeman / W5CCF - Summit, Ms.
John Barnes Jr. / N5WWL - Denham Springs, La.
26 Jan, 2020 - Hammond VE Group
Technician
Joel McClure / K5KZX - Madisonville, La.
Many thanks to all the VEs' who came out and helped with the sessions!
Your time and dedication is greatly appreciated!!!
73
Tyrone / N5XES - Hammond VE Group

UPCOMING EVENTS:

60th Annual Acadiana Hamfest 2020, ARRL Louisiana State Convention
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
03/13/2020
Start Date: 03/13/2020
End Date: 03/14/2020
Location: Rayne Civic Center
210 Frog Festival Drive
Rayne, LA 70578
Website: http://www.w5ddl.org/hamfest.htm
Sponsor: Acadiana Amateur Radio Association and The City of Rayne, LA
Type: ARRL Convention
Talk-In: 146.820 MHz -0.600 (PL 103.5) W5DDL
Public Contact: Brandon Stelly , KG5LQMPhone: 337-205-2112
Email: hamfest@w5ddl.org

Northeast Louisiana Hamfest, ARRL Louisiana Section Convention
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
04/17/2020
Start Date: 04/17/2020
End Date: 04/17/2020
Location: West Monroe Convention Center
901 Ridge Avenue
West Monroe, LA 71291
Sponsor: NorthEast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club (NELARC)
Type: ARRL Convention
Talk-In: 146.85-
Public Contact: Scott Dickson , W5WZ
Phone: 318-355-2220
Email: w5wz@arrl.net

Please remember that anyone who wishes to see something published in the
monthly newsletters please email me at k5jmr@arrl.org or contact our
Section PIC or any of the Region PIOs:
Public Information Coordinator(PIC):  Joe Holland, KB5VJY  
kb5vjy@gmail.com
PIOs by Region:
R1:  Joey Falgout, N5TWR   n5twr@outlook.com
R2:  Elmer Tatum, N5EKF   elmer.tatum21@gmail.com
R4:  Ed Roy, WA5TNK   edroy@edroy.com
R6:  Jim Bookter, N5NVP   n5nvp@arrl.net
R7:  Marcel Livesay, N5VU   n5vu@yahoo.com
R8:  Joe Holland, KB5VJY  kb5vjy@gmail.com

Our next Monthly Book/Prize drawing is March 1st…..If you have not
sent me your call sign please do at k5jmr@arrl.org 
I will draw for our ARRL Louisiana Section Affiliated Club(Book), ARRL
Louisiana Section Member(Book) and for a ARRL Louisiana Section Member
for the Electronic item.  Good Luck to ALL!

See you in Rayne/73,

--------------------------------------------------------------------
ARRL Louisiana Section
Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR
k5jmr@arrl.org
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter January 2020

Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter January 2020

I hope this finds each of you happy and healthy as we enter the new
year.  The Hammond Hamfest is coming soon; January 18th. I hope to see
many of you there. We will have two hours for our ARRL/ARES Forums and I
will have some nice prizes to give away. 

Silent Keys: (as listed in the February 2020 QST)
Randall B. Prewitt, K4LJA

New Hams: Welcome to the hobby!
Report for 2020-01-03
Henry D Flanagan, KI5HQT
Tobi Provenzano, KI5HQW
Geoffrey M Single, KI5HQX
Todd J Rudloff, KI5HNX
Shane J Stokes, KI5HQZ
Nicholas B Dykes, KI5HQR
Salvatore Esola, KI5HQS
Christopher Biernat, KI5HQP
Federico M Lertora, KI5HQU
Elizabeth E Wotawa, KI5HRA
Luke A Cressionie, KI5HQQ
Eric G Benoit, KI5HQO
Matthew M Lewis, KI5HQV
Charles R Smith, KI5HQY
Heather B Heaney, KI5HOF
James A Johnson, KI5HQC

Upgraded License: Congratulations!
Matthew C Wiggins, KI5HLC

New/Renewed ARRL Members:  Welcome/Welcome back!
Elise G Karcher, N5LIT
Kenneth A Bell, WB5UYN
Esdy S Agoro
Trygve E Reid, KI5HFU
James Boyd, KI5HLN
Mary L Matamoros, KF5AXR
Steve P Webre, AF5VR
Randal J Castille, N5MLJ
Willis E Shobe, W6LKT
Kaleb Morgan, KG5AAF
Paul J Mccrory, KF5MHG
John C Marston, KG5VWN
Jeffrey G Welsh, KF5ENP
Robert E Hobbs, N5ULA
Cheryl Ellis, KA5VOP
Robert M Ellis, KA5NGO
Emily Laprarie, KI5GJB
Dustin W Howell, W5CFI
Randall F Ford, KF5EZR
Connor Wiedemeier, KF5MTQ
James Johnson, KI5HQC
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From the ARRL

Computer Bulletin Board System Co-Inventor Randy Suess, ex-WB9GPM, SK
12/31/2019
The co-inventor of the Computer Bulletin Board System, Randy Suess,
ex-WB9GPM, died on December 10. He was 74. According to his obituary in
The New York Times, Suess and IBM engineer Ward Christensen collaborated
on the system in 1978, during the dial-up era, a year before Compuserve
began offering online consumer service. The computer bulletin board was
a forerunner of today’s proliferation of social media outlets.
Suess and Christensen were members of the Chicago Area Computer
Hobbyists’ Exchange (CACHE), and the system was initially developed so
that club members could more easily communicate with one another. By the
time the Chicago BBS was retired in the 1980s, it had been accessed more
than 500,000 times. — Thanks to Wes Plouff, AC8JF

New England Radio Amateur Hosts Video on Tower Safety
12/31/2019
Jim Idelson, K1IR, of Sudbury, Massachusetts, recently provided a club
meeting program on ham radio tower safety for the Billerica Amateur
Radio Society (BARS). Kayla Creamer, W2IRY, recorded and edited the
presentation and made it available online. It runs approximately 1 hour
and 10 minutes.
In his presentation, Idelson said an estimated 38,000 amateur radio
towers are standing in the US, with 24 hours of climbing time per tower
each year. He noted that two tower-climbing fatalities have occurred in
the past year, with a calculated fatality rate that’s twice that of
commercial tower workers. In more than half of amateur tower incidents,
the climber fell while tied into the tower, while another 37% involved
falls. Idelson advised radio amateurs to plan, identify, and mitigate
risks in advance of a climb, to focus and be patient, and not to get
distracted.
“Risks of tower work are far too high,” Idelson told his audience.
“Success depends on creating a culture that values safety.”
http://www.arrl.org/news/new-england-radio-amateur-hosts-video-on-tower-safety

Yahoo Groups Shutdown has Ham Radio Interest Groups Seeking to Save
Content
12/31/2019
Yahoo Groups, which has hosted a considerable number of ham radio
interest groups over the years, is shutting down. All previously posted
content on the site became unavailable in mid-December, but Yahoo is
processing requests to download content until January 31, 2020. Yahoo
also has provided group administrators (“admins”) a way to export
data ahead of that deadline. Groups will continue to live on in some
limited fashion, but all groups will become private, and nearly all of
the functionality that made them popular in the first place will
disappear.
Around since 2001, Yahoo Groups, now owned by Verizon, has provided
online repositories of communications and information on a wide variety
of specialized subjects and activities, including Amateur Radio. Yahoo
Groups for nearly every radio have been established, where owners could
exchange information and ask questions. Other groups on the Yahoo
platform offered a watering hole for those interested in a particular
ham radio activity as well as for those who want to buy and sell gear
and components. Some clubs and ham radio logging software users have
taken advantage of Yahoo Groups.
New platforms such as Groups.io, Facebook, and Google are looking to
assume the role that Yahoo Groups is stepping away from. Groups.io
charges fees to migrate content onto its platform, however, and Facebook
and Google lack the ability to import content at all. With Groups.io as
the most likely successor platform, many admins have assumed the
migration expense and relocated group content so it would not be lost.
Not all groups have been as fortunate, however, putting them into the
position of starting from scratch and losing years of conversations,
files, polls, and data.
Web application developer Andy Majot, K5QO, of Sellersburg, Indiana,
took the initiative to download archives of Yahoo Groups devoted to
individual ham radio gear and uploaded them to his personal website.
“I hope to have them hosted in perpetuity for future hams to use,”
Majot told ARRL. “It should be noted that I backed up groups
regardless of whether they are living on in other platforms; I wanted to
snapshot the groups as they were on Yahoo prior to their deletion.”
Majot noted that several of the groups he has archived have already
migrated their content to Groups.io, but many more have not.
Majot said an organization called Archive Team is helping to save as
many Yahoo Groups as possible and has been backing these up since the
closure announcement in October, but, Majot said, progress has nearly
halted since Yahoo cut off access to many group features in
mid-December.
Majot invited those seeking to relocate Yahoo Groups archives to contact
him. “I would be happy to host these files, alongside my other
archives,” he said. — Thanks to Andy Majot, K5QO 

Texas Scout Leaders Promote Amateur Radio as a Communication Resource
12/31/2019
In 2017, Category 4 Hurricane Harvey left the region of Texas where
Assistant Scoutmaster Scott deMasi, KC5NKW, lived under water. With
roads flooded, bridges washed away, and cellular service and power out,
deMasi said it soon became clear that his Scout troop’s emergency
preparedness plan wasn’t designed for a storm of this magnitude. It
was frustrating, deMasi says, to discover he couldn’t reliably reach
all of Troop 839’s 100 Scouts and their families to check if they were
okay or to organize relief efforts as a unit. Something had to be done.
After the waters receded, deMasi and Assistant Scoutmaster David Godell
came up with a plan that would not leave the troop incommunicado after a
major weather disaster. With 15 years’ experience as a radio amateur,
deMasi suggested encouraging Scouts and parents trained to become ham
radio licensees.
“It’s a lifesaving skill, and it helps us to be prepared,”
Godell
said. (“Be Prepared” is the Boy Scouts motto.)
An initial interest meeting was set, and Scouts were given links to
study materials and offered transportation to examination sites, but
participation was low. So, deMasi and Godell worked with a local radio
club, the Texas Emergency Amateur Communicators, to organize a 1-day
Technician licensing class that also would fulfill most requirements for
Scouting’s Radio merit badge.
In addition, the two Assistant Scoutmasters bought inexpensive handheld
radios that they programmed to frequencies the troop would use, so after
the class, the Scouts would receive the equipment needed to continue
using their new skills.
Armed with their radios, more than two dozen licensed Scouts and adults
began utilizing their newly earned communication capability at Scouting
events. During campouts, they radioed information to patrols across the
camp. On these occasions, the troop practices a “no cell phone”
policy; ham radio provided the means to stay in touch with others.
At service projects, they communicated directions to Scouts spread
throughout a wide area. Having radios and opportunities to regularly use
them gave the Scouts confidence to get on the air. Seeing licensed
Scouts with their handheld radios also encouraged other Scouts to get
licensed as well.
“Once the Scouts got radios, others wanted radios,” Godell said.
Some Troop 839 members participated in the annual Jamboree on the Air
(JOTA), talking with other Scouts in several other states and in Central
America.
“You could see eyes light up,” deMasi recalled. — Adapted
from a
Scouting Magazine blog post by Michael Freeman

MIT Radio Society W1MX Announces January Lecture Series on “Everything
Radio”
01/02/2020
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Radio Society (W1MX) and the
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science are hosting a
lecture series in January that may answer some of your questions about
such topics as radar techniques, interferometry, imaging, and radio
astronomy, to antenna design and modern chip-scale RF devices. No prior
experience with radio is necessary, and all are welcome.
All lectures will take place in the Green Building — MIT’s tallest
academic building. Sessions will be live streamed and archived for later
viewing.
The lectures kick off on January 10 with “The Next Generation of
Weather Radar.” Other topics include “Lightning
Interferometry”
(January 13); “Radio Noises from the Sky” (January 15);
“EDGES:
Measuring the Early Universe” (January 22); “Antennas”
(January
24), and “Chip-Scale THz Circuits and Sensors” (January 29).
Lectures begin at 5 PM ET and conclude at 7 PM.
The club’s Daniel Sheen, KC1EPN, noted that the rooftop W1XM
facilities in the Green Building are scheduled for removal as part of a
renovation project. A capital campaign is under way to establish a new
facility with improved capabilities for academic research and
recreational activity.

W1AW to be on the Air for Winter Field Day
01/02/2020
Members of the Warren County (New York) Amateur Radio Club (W2WCR) will
activate Maxim Memorial Station W1AW for Winter Field Day 2020 over the
January 25 – 26 weekend. Winter Field Day is sponsored by the Winter
Field Day Association (WFDA), which believes that emergency
communication is important throughout the year. Winter Field Day is open
to radio amateurs worldwide.
The WFDA’s goal is to help enhance operating skills and to prepare
participants for all environmental conditions. Winter Field Day runs for
24 hours. Station set-up may start no earlier than 1900 UTC on the day
before the event and may not take any longer than 12 hours in total.
Expect activity on all amateur bands except 12, 17, 30, and 60 meters.
All modes that can handle the required exchange are welcome; this does
not include FT8. Entry categories include indoor, outdoor, and home.
Full details are on the Winter Field Day website.
https://www.winterfieldday.com/

New 60 MHz Beacon Now on the Air from Ireland
01/03/2020
The first — and so far only — beacon on 60 MHz went on the air on
December 16. The call sign is EI1KNH. In early 2018, the 60 MHz
(5-meter) band was allocated to radio amateurs in Ireland on a
secondary, non-interference basis. The beacon is on 60.013 MHz and runs
25 W into a vertical folded dipole. The new 5-meter beacon is sharing a
site already occupied by EI0SIX on 6 meters, and EI4RF on 4 meters,
about 12 miles south of Dublin in IO63VE. An 8-meter beacon is scheduled
to be on the air in the next few months. It will operate on 40.013 MHz.

Australian Bushfires Causing Major Telecommunication Outages, Hams Asked
to Remain Alert
01/03/2020
Wireless Institute of Australia (WIA) President Greg Kelly, VK2GPK, says
the bushfires in Australia have caused or are expected to cause
significant disruption of telecommunication services in the states of
Victoria and New South Wales. 
“The scope and range of these impacts is unknown at this stage but are
predicted to cover all internet and phone (fixed and mobile) and other
commercial radio services,” he said. Kelly has asked radio amateurs in
International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region 3 to monitor the
emergency communications frequencies, per the IARU Region 3 band plan,
whenever possible, as well as repeaters.
“Amateurs seeking to establish emergency communication should use
these EMCOMM frequencies in the first instance, or repeaters if
available,” he said in a statement posted on the IARU Region 3
website. “Radio amateurs who are volunteers for [emergency
communication organizations] should keep themselves updated. Emergency
communication is one of the main reasons radio amateurs have access to
RF spectrum. Please assist if and when you can.”
The IARU Region 3 emergency “center of activity” frequencies are
3.600, 7.110, 14.300, 18.160, and 21.360 MHz. These are not net
frequencies, but they are recommended as starting points for emergency
traffic, and activity may extend 5 kHz above or below the designated
center frequency. 

San Joaquin Valley Section Manager Dan Pruitt, AE6SX, SK
01/03/2020
ARRL San Joaquin Valley Section Manager Dan Pruitt, AE6SX, of Fresno,
California, died on December 27. He was 68. At the time of his death,
Pruitt had been hospitalized as a result of a fall. First licensed in
1965, Pruitt had served as SJV SM since 2009 and earlier this year began
a new 2-year term. A successor will be appointed.
Pruitt had previously served as Fresno County Emergency Coordinator, and
his focus has been on improving emergency communication in his region,
working with the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES), the
National Traffic System, the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS), the
American Red Cross, the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), and
the System for Administration, Training, and Educational Resources for
NASA (SATERN). He had also served as SJV Public Information Officer.

South Orkney Islands DXpedition will Use VP8PJ
01/03/2020
The Perseverance DX Group’s DXpedition to South Orkney, set for
February 20 until March 5, will use the call sign VP8PJ. The group
initially announced that it would use VP8/VP8DXU.
“Alan Armstrong, VK6CQ, a recent addition to the team, holds the call
sign VP8PJ that was issued to him for operation from the British
Antarctic Territory,” the DXpedition has announced. “After
submission of a copy of Alan’s license, ARRL has issued us a new LoTW
certificate for the use of this call from South Orkney for the duration
of our expedition.”
Contact the DXpedition via email.
http://www.arrl.org/news/south-orkney-islands-dxpedition-will-use-vp8pj

YOTA Month Reported a Success in the Americas
01/15/2020
For several years now, Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) has sponsored YOTA
Month each December, primarily involving young radio amateurs in Europe
and Africa. In December, youth-operated amateur radio stations in the
Americas picked up the ball to contribute more than 12,000 contacts to
the worldwide event. Eighteen operators aged 25 or younger deployed
special event 1 × 1 call signs — K8Y, K8O, K8T, and K8A — to
promote youth in amateur radio. Fifteen young operators across the US
took turns using these call signs throughout December. They logged
10,474 contacts using those call signs on SSB, CW, digital modes, and
satellites. Some operators also aired the call signs during contests.
Participants in the Americas offered opinions on what made the event
special for them.
“Operating-wise, it was definitely the pileups…I love a good
pileup,” said Mason Matrazzo, KM4SII. “Apart from that, it was great
getting to be part of a group of youngsters that are all into the hobby.
Even though we weren’t physically working together, we all got to be
part of the YOTA program over the air.”
Audrey McElroy, KM4BUN, also cited the on-air camaraderie. “My
favorite part of YOTA month was getting the wonderful experience of
talking to other youth all over the world and sharing our
experiences,” she said. “It gives us hope to know the future of
Amateur Radio is in the hands of these great kids.” Her brother Jack,
KM4ZIA, also took part.
In Canada, David Samu, VE7DZO, signed VE7YOTA in December, making 458
contacts on CW. “My favorite part was seeing all the YOTA stations on
the air throughout December and seeing all the high energy youth
activity,” he said.
Mathias Acevedo, CE2LR, activated XR2YOTA, and met another young
operator from Chile, Manu Pardo, CA3MPR, through YOTA month. Between
them, they put 1,535 contacts into the log on CW, SSB, and digital
modes.
Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO, coordinated the efforts of the 17 participants
and the logs for the US stations. “I learned much during the month
about the importance of teamwork and communication...just like
baseball,” Bryant said about his role as coordinator. “I think YOTA
month was a great success considering the short amount of time we had to
plan this all out. I had a lot of fun operating this event, but it was
even more rewarding to see other youth here in the Americas make tons of
QSOs during December.” Bryant managed Logbook of The World accounts
for the US stations and QRZ.com pages for all call signs, maintained an
operator schedule, worked with YOTA Month Award Manager Tomi Varro,
HA8RT, and reported in to the YOTA Camp Committee in the Americas.
Globally, nearly 129,000 contacts were logged using 48 call signs, all
operated by hams under the age of 25 or younger. More than 2,500
operators of all ages requested and received awards based on the number
of YOTA contacts they had made. Statistics are available.
The first Youth On The Air camp in the US will take place next June 21
– 26 at the National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting in West
Chester Township, Ohio.
For more information about YOTA in the Americas, contact YOTA Month in
the Americas Coordinator Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO, or YOTA in the Americas
Camp Director Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.

Puerto Rico Earthquake Relief Effort Continues, with Help from Ham
Radio
01/15/2020
In Puerto Rico, Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) volunteers
continue to operate from the American Red Cross distribution center in
Yauco — one of the towns hit the hardest by the recent earthquakes and
ongoing aftershocks on the island. The Red Cross requested assistance
last week to identify undeclared refugee camps and to report on close or
damaged roadways and bridges. ARES District 5 Emergency Coordinator Herb
Perez, WP4ZZ, who is among those volunteering for the Red Cross at
Yauco, reported on January 14 that he, Melvin Velazquez, WP4RAP, and
Yolanda Garcia, WP4QZF, are on duty there.
“Today, we were able to occupy our space with no major incident other
than the usual shaking of the entire structure. More than 10 per
hour,” Perez said. “One of our members Jared Martinez, KP4LCO, was
able to search near his hometown of Lajas and was able to locate more
than 10 unidentified campsites around the area.” Perez said such
reports enable the Red Cross to provide necessary assistance to those
left homeless as a result of the earthquakes.
Perez said volunteers were able to collect food for isolated communities
in the mountain region from a church-run food pantry in Sabana Grande.
He said local members of the GMRS and Citizens Band radio communities
have been pitching in.
Operations from Yauco have been on VHF and UHF, although commercial
telecommunication services remain in operation for the most part.
Another station has been established at the Red Cross Headquarters in
the capital of San Juan, which is not in the earthquake zone. Puerto
Rico Section Manager Oscar Resto, KP4RF, said the stations are operating
as a backbone, in the event of new or stronger earthquakes. HF equipment
has been safely stowed if communications fail, Resto said. Most of
Puerto Rico now has power and water.
ARRL is shipping six VHF/UHF base/repeater antennas and six 50-foot
rolls of LMR-400 coax, through the Ham Aid Fund. Resto said a new Red
Cross warehouse will be place in Mayagüez, where he will install a
third station for backbone communication. “That is the reason for the
new antennas,” he said. “We already have the radios. In case we need
to escalate to HF, we are ready with ARRL go-kits from Hurricane
Maria.”
The ARES team in Yauco has also been handling health-and-welfare traffic
from the earthquake zone. Operations are running from 9 AM until 5 PM
each day.
A magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck the southwestern part of Puerto Rico
on January 7, fast on the heels of a magnitude 5.8 tremor the day
before. The worst-impacted cities were Guayanilla, Peñuelas, Yauco, and
Guánica, where most homes are no longer habitable. 

AM Rally 2020 Gets Under Way on February 1
01/15/2020
The fourth annual AM Rally operating event will take place February 1
– 3 (UTC). The annual AM Rally encourages all operators to explore
amateur radio's original voice mode by showcasing the various types of
AM equipment in use today, ranging from early vacuum-tube rigs to the
newest SDR-based transceivers.
“Both new and experienced ops are discovering that AM can sound quite
good, enhancing the enjoyment of contacts,” said Clark Burgard, N1BCG,
an enthusiastic promoter of the event. “The AM Rally provides a great
reason to give it a try.”
The AM Rally is open to all radio amateurs capable of running
full-carrier, amplitude modulation (standard AM) using any type of radio
equipment — modern, vintage, tube, solid-state, software-defined,
military, boat anchor, broadcast, homebrew, or commercially manufactured
— are encouraged to join in the AM fun on 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, and
6 meters.
Details are on the AM Rally website or contact Burgard via email. The AM
Rally is sponsored by ARRL, Radio Engineering Associates, and
iNetRadio.

From around the Louisiana Section:

Region 4:
From: Volume 60, Number 01 ACADIANA AMATEUR RADIO ASSOC., INC. - a
501(c)3 Corporation January 2020
A New Start For 2020 On December 12th, 2019, the members of the Acadiana
Amateur Radio Association got together for our Christmas Dinner at the
Golden Coral. It was a time to celebrate and mingle while enjoying each
others company. And this year was extra special for us all. Herman
Campbell KN5GRK had an accident earlier this year and was hospitalized
for several weeks. Luckily, Ramona Jobe KG5HNO spent her time and love
helping him to recover. After the several years they have been friends,
those two decided to surprise everybody. Herman and Ramona decided to
make their friendship more permanent. Congratulations to these two!!
Since this dinner was not to talk about the club, time was spent talking
and discussing ideas and seeking advice for our hobby in some cases. And
merely ragjawing in others! Friendship and camaraderie were the key
points.

2019 MARS COMEX Involves ARES, RACES, Others During October and
corresponding with the ARRL Simulated Emergency Test (SET), Military
Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) reached out to the amateur radio community
to continue building working relationships and improving
interoperability. As part of this effort, MARS promoted the use of a
serial phase-shift keying protocol, Military Standard 188-110 (M110) on
the 60-meter interoperability channels. Radio amateurs are authorized to
use this digital mode there. Starting on November 2 and continuing until
November 17, the MARS community executed Department of Defense (DOD)
Communications Exercise (COMEX) 19-4. MARS members use the exercise to
continue training and refining their operator skills to provide
situational awareness such as county status reports and weather
observations. The exercise culminated on November 16 with military
stations sending M110 messages to the amateur community on 60-meter
channel 1 (5330.5 kHz USB). [When the results have been compiled and
reported out, we will publish them here. - ed.] MARS rep Ralph Brigham,
AAR4IG, said "In future DOD Communications Exercises, I suspect that
more participation between MARS and the Amateur Radio Service will be
encouraged." He said "a good analogy of what MARS does for DOD is as
SKYWARN is the eyes and ears for the NWS at the local ground level, MARS
acts as a relay of state and local reports from ARES, RACES, and other
served agencies up the Department of Defense communications network." -
Thanks, Ralph Brigham, AAR4IG Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Thanks
for all that you do. 73 Glen KF5FNP

Oldest Known US Ham Receives ARRL Centurion Award The oldest known US
radio amateur, Cliff Kayhart, W4KKP, received his ARRL Centurion Award
plaque in November. The award recognizes hams who have achieved
centenarian status. Kayhart, who lives in White Rock, South Carolina, is
108. The ARRL Board of Directors conferred the award on Kayhart at its
July 2019 meeting. At the November meeting of the Dutch Fork Amateur
Radio Group in Little Mountain, South Carolina, ARRL Roanoke Division
Director Bud Hippisley, W2RU, headed an ARRL delegation that presented
the Centurion Award plaque to Kayhart, who was first licensed as W2LFE
in 1937 (he's also held W9GNQ). With Hippisley for the presentation were
Roanoke Division Vice Director Bill Morine, N2COP, and South Carolina
Section Manager Marc Tarplee, N4UFP. Kayhart served in Iwo Jima during
World War II, shortly after the US victory there, setting up long-range
radio communication from the island to Tokyo to arrange for the eventual
surrender by Japan. Kayhart remains active, checking into several nets
from his assisted living facility. Centurion Award recipients have their
annual ARRL membership fees waived while continuing to receive QST and
other ARRL member benefits. Kayhart was profiled in the June 2018 issue
of QST.

Emergency Communications VS Radio Prepping By Joseph “Moe” Meaux In
a natural emergency such as a major wildfire breakout or a hurricane,
Emergency Communications (EmComm) will go up to try to provide
assistance for the people in the area. All EmComm situations will have
several Federal, State, and Country departments and Organizations
involved to provide whatever aid is needed. Although the EmComm
situation may last for days or weeks, it will eventually end. The people
and equipment will go back home eventually. Its not that the situation
has changed, its just that the situation has changed from an emergency.
Yes, the situation is still bad, but help has come and the situation
will get better. Participants will rotate out and may return. The
equipment EmComm uses is usually personal GO Kits and generators. EmComm
needs radios with lots of power and current to get the signals out of
the area to get help. A QRP radio and a battery pack won’t cut the
mustard. You need QRO Power and Currents to be effective. EmComm is very
limited in scope. Usually it is to help provide immediate services, but
it will end once those services are in place. Operators know that they
will be able to go home soon, even if it is several weeks that they are
deployed. Radio Prepping is different. The operator is preparing for the
Worst Case Scenario; whether is Nuclear War, World War 3, or a Meteor
Strike. Preppers are looking out for themselves, their immediate family,
and maybe some friends. The Prepper is not trying to get tons of help.
The Prepper is trying to evaluate the situation and see if they can get
to help. The Prepper has no support infrastructure. They are on their
own. The situation may last for months or years. Such an operator must
consider what he or she may need. This involves the mode of
transportation. If a vehicle is available, they must consider how long
will the vehicle last as transportation before it breaks down or runs
out of fuel. You can put more in a vehicle, but if you have to abandon
it, what you have you will need to carry. That mobile radio in your
vehicle may be useless if you can’t provide it power. Those lead acid
batteries do get a bit heavy after a short time of carrying them. That
big radio also gets too heavy. If you are using solar panels to recharge
your batteries (especially those rigid framed ones), they will be
useless if you can’t carry them. The Prepper will usually use QRP
radios and smaller batter packs. (You will notice I used the plural. In
a bugout emergency, two is better than one.) Don’t forget you have to
carry it. You don’t need lots of power to transmit or receive. You
would probably spend most of your time simply listening, trying to
figure what is happening and where you can go for help. Using voice, CW,
or digital modes, you can learn a lot. And attempt to get there. Even
with QRP, you can find out about areas that are safe and learn of areas
that are not safe. The Prepper knows the situation may never get better.
Just tolerable. For more information about Prepping, I like Julian
OH8STN on Youtube. Also, I found a website that talks about lots of this
stuff at radiopreppers.com

AARA Monday Night 2 Meter Net Net Controllers will rotate each week and
held on the 146.820 W5DDL Repeater only. The 146/820 and 443.00
Repeaters located on the Chase Towers downtown Lafayette are down
indefinitely due to roof repairs. The AARA Monday Night Net and the
Silent Key Memorial Net is being held on the 147.040 repeater in Duson,
LA until repairs are completed. The 145.410 in Lydia is back up, PL of
123.0. The January 2020 schedule can be downloaded and printed in Adobe
Acrobat .PDF from the club website.

REGION 4 SKYWARN NET Each Tuesday night at 7:00 PM (local), the Region 4
Skywarn Net will take place on the 145.370 Skywarn Repeater in
Lafayette, LA. Net Control Operators will alternate each week. In case
the 145.370 repeater fails, the net will ne held on the 146.820 W5DDL
repeater PL Tone 103.5. The January 2020 schedule can be found at this
link: Net Schedules When using the Skywarn 145.370 repeater, be sure to
use the receiver PL tone for your area as follows: NW Quadrant 114.8 -
NE Quadrant 127.3 – SW Quadrant 141.3 – SE Quadrant 94.8 –
Central
103.5 See our website for additional information:
http://www.w5ddl.org/repeaters.htm

Stuffed Pork Loin This is my own recipe that I came up with. I had
purchased a 5- lb pork loin and about 4 links of boudin at Earl’s on
Verot School Road near Pinhook. On the way home, I thought about
stuffing the pork loin with boudin. Here goes. Unwrap and pork loin and
trim off any excess fat. Lay out on cutting board, and with a sharp
butcher knife, begin to trim lengthwise and unroll the loin, cutting
about 3/8- to 1/2-inch thick. Keep unrolling and cutting until the loin
lays flat. Remove boudin from the casing and press flat onto loin.
Season all over with Tony’s and garlic powder. Begin to reroll the
loin with the boudin in the center as tightly as possible. Once
completely rolled, tie with string in several points so it does not
unroll. Place in roaster or in flat baking dish. Season outside with
Tony’s and garlic powder. Cover with aluminum foil or cover, and bake
at 350 degrees for about one hour-15 minutes. Remove from oven and allow
to settle about 20 minutes before cutting into slices.

AROUND THE SECTION:

Region 9:
The SELARC "Hamster"
________________________________________
*Serving Amateur Radio Since 1974*
Published Monthly by the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club Inc.
P.O. Box 1324, Hammond LA 70404
Visit our website: www.selarc.org
SELARC 2020 Hamfest
As a reminder, The SELARC Hamfest on January 18, 2020, and the club is
still in need of many more ticket sales. Please contact Ernie Bush to
obtain more tickets to sell or email us to request.
The 4 main prizes for tickets also listed on the SELARC Hamfest page -
main prize winners do not need to be present at the drawing and if a
non-ham wins can receive the cash value equivalent shown in place of
item, prizes include:
o	1st Prize: Yaesu FT-450D or $500
o	2nd Prize: Yaesu FTM-400XDR or $350
o	3rd Prize: AA-230 Zoom Antennae Analyzer or $200
o	4th Prize: Yaesu FT-70DR or $100
Hammond VE Group - ARRL/W5YI tests are scheduled for the last Sunday of
each month [with the exception of holiday conflicts] in Room "B" of the
North Oaks Medical System Diagnostic Center at 2pm with $15 testing fee.
Bring photo ID and any appropriate CSCE. For more information contact
n5xes@arrl.net or Find an Amateur Radio License Exam in Your Area.
Happy Birthday
Birthday Wishes for January go out to - Thomas N5HAY, Keith KF5VLX,
Larry WD5HLE, and Pete WB5ERM.
If we missed your birthday, then please let us know.
Get Well Soon —
Best wishes for continued recuperation go to SELARC members Tom Simpson
N5HAY and Homer Jones KA5TRT. We look forward to hearing you on the
air!

Tyke's TidBits:
Well, here we are,
a new year ahead of us and the 39th Annual, SELARC Hammond Hamfest in
our sights!
We still need to get out and sell advance tickets and get the word out
on as many local nets as possible, to get a great turn-out for this
event.
Also, we still need people to sign-up for the Hamfest duties and work
schedule if you haven't already. We really need member participation to
make this event a success!!! Table reservations are slowly coming in.
Ham World will be our main radio and goodies vendor, so if you are in
need of a particular item from them, give them a call and make
arrangements for them to bring it down when they come. It is a great way
to save on shipping cost!!!
Other vendors at this time will be TN07 Engineering, Sign-Man of Baton
Rouge , Macs Computers, and Navi-Com USA!
Hoping to see you at the meeting and the Hamfest!
73
Tyrone - N5XES
President – SELARC

HAMFEST/CONVENTION
01/18/2020
Start Date: 01/18/2020
End Date: 01/18/2020
Location: Pennington Student Activity Center
1350 North General Pershing Drive
Hammond, LA 70401
Website: http://www.selarc.org
Sponsor: Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club, Inc.
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Talk-In: 147.000 / -600khz (PL 107.2)
Public Contact: Tyrone Burns , N5XES
P.O. Box 1324 Hammond, LA 70404
Phone: 985-687-2139
Email: n5xes@arrl.net

PENNINGTON STUDENT ACTIVITY CENTER
1350 North General Pershing Street
ON CAMPUS OF SOUTHEASTERN LA UNIVERSITY AT INTERSECTION OF UNIVERSITY
AVENUE & NORTH GENERAL PERSHING STREET
(Take Exit 32 from I-55, Go East 1.5 Miles on University Avenue to North
General Pershing Street)

 
	  
DELTA DIVISION
Main Prize Drawing at 1:30pm
Winner Need Not Be Present for the 4 Main Prizes!
For More Info Contact:
Tyrone Burns N5XES
Hourly Prize Drawings
VE Test Session
8:00am:  Testing Begins - Test Fee $15 cash, photo ID, copy of license
or CSCE
 Testing Begins Promptly at 8:00am
TYRONE BURNS VE Liaison, n5xes@arrl.net
 Forums:
 10:00am
ARRL Forum
11:00am
ARES Forum
 12:00noon
LCARC Meeting
Dealers  &  Vendors
Click to Download Application
Ham World Inc.
Sign-Man of Baton Rouge
TNØ7 Engineering
Navcom USA
Swap Tables
Table Manager Tyrone Burns n5xes@arrl.net
Prize Donations
ARRL
DX Engineering
EasyWayHamBooks.com
***  Main Prize Drawings  ***
Grand Prize
Yaesu FT-450D or $500
Second Prize
Yaesu FTM-400XDR or $350
Third Prize
AA-230 Zoom Antennae Analyzer or $200
Fourth Prize
Yaesu FT-70DR or $100
Winner Need Not Be Present for the 4 Main Prizes!

Hamfests coming up:

60th Annual Acadiana Hamfest 2020, ARRL Louisiana State Convention
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
03/13/2020
Start Date: 03/13/2020
End Date: 03/14/2020
Location: Rayne Civic Center
210 Frog Festival Drive
Rayne, LA 70578
Website: http://www.w5ddl.org/hamfest.htm
Sponsor: Acadiana Amateur Radio Association and The City of Rayne, LA
Type: ARRL Convention
Talk-In: 146.820 MHz -0.600 (PL 103.5) W5DDL
Public Contact: Brandon Stelly , KG5LQM
105 St. Claude Place Apt D Youngsville, LA 70592
Phone: 337-205-2112
Email: hamfest@w5ddl.org
AARA Hamfest Information
2020 HAMFEST
March 13 - 14, 2020
Rayne Civic Center, Rayne LA
Each year the AARA hosts it's annual Hamfest to support club activities
as well as the purchase and maintenance of club equipment.  The upcoming
2020 Hamfest will be held March 13 - 14, 2020 at the Rayne Civic Center
in Rayne, LA.  The event will be open to the public from 3:00 PM until
8:00 PM on Friday.  It will reopen to the public from 8:00 AM until 3:00
PM on Saturday.
Plenty of good food will be available on site. 
Boiled crawfish will be served at 6:00 PM on Friday but pre-registration
is required.
Pre-registration forms are available at Pre-Registration Form.
Additional information regarding vendors, prizes, forums, etc will be
posted on this website once that information becomes available.

Capital City Hamfest, ARRL 2020 Mississippi State Convention
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
01/24/2020
Start Date: 01/24/2020
End Date: 01/25/2020
Location: Mississippi Trade Market, Mississippi State Fairgrounds
1207 Mississippi Street
Jackson, MS 39201
Website: http://mshamfest.org
Sponsor: Jackson Amateur Radio Club
Type: ARRL Convention
Talk-In: 146.76, No tone
Public Contact: Gary Young , K5GCY
5354 Brookhollow Drive Jackson, MS 39212
Phone: 601-260-8214
Email: k5gcy@att.net

Cowtown Hamfest, ARRL North Texas Section Convention
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
01/17/2020
Start Date: 01/17/2020
End Date: 01/18/2020
Location: Forest Hill Civic And Convention Center
6901 Wichita Street
Forest Hill, TX
Website: http://www.cowtownhamfest.com
Sponsor: Cowtown Amateur Radio Club and other local clubs
Type: ARRL Convention
Talk-In: 146.940 ( PL 110.9)
Public Contact: David Forbes , KC5UYR
2721 Marigold Avenue Fort Worth, TX 76111
Phone: 817-925-5126
Email: kc5uyr@compuserve.com

Orange Hamfest 2020
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
02/21/2020
Start Date: 02/21/2020
End Date: 02/22/2020
Location: Orange County Convention & Expo Center
11475 FM 1442
Orange, TX 77630
Website:
https://www.qsl.net/w5nd/index_files/HAMFEST%20INFO/hamfest%20info.htm
Sponsor: Orange ARC, Jefferson Co. ARC, Beaumont ARC
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Talk-In: 147.180 (PL 103.5)
Public Contact: Rocky Wilson , N5MTX
3736 3rd Avenue Orange, TX 77630
Phone: 409-988-8906
Email: rockygwilson@hotmail.com

Irving Amateur Radio Hamfest
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
03/07/2020
Start Date: 03/07/2020
End Date: 03/07/2020
Location: Betcha Bingo Hall
2420 W Irving Blvd
Irving, TX 75014
Website: http://irvingarc.org/
Sponsor: Irving amateur Radio Club, Inc.
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Talk-In: 146.720, (PL 110.9)
Public Contact: Ken Hansen , N2VIP
P.O. Box 153333 Irving, TX 75061
Phone: 609-510-3068
Email: hamfest@irvingarc.org

Hanging Judge Hamfest
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
04/04/2020
Start Date: 04/04/2020
End Date: 04/04/2020
Location: Sebastian County Storm Shelter Ben Garen Park
7700 So. Zero St.
Fort Smith, AR 72901
Website: http://www.hangingjudgehamfest.com/
Sponsor: Fort Smith Area Amateur Radio Club
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Talk-In: 146.640 W5ANR Repeater (PL 88.5)
Public Contact: Rory Bowers , K5CKS
4722 N. Main Street Fort Smith, AR 72904
Phone: 479-926-5402
Email: k6cks01@gmail.com

With the Hammond Hamfest starting in 2 days I wanted to get this
newsletter out before then.  I will have much more information in
February; so please be looking for that.

If you or your club has anything they wish for us to pass along in the
Section Managers Newsletter please feel free to get that to one of our
PIO’s, our PIC or me.  

73,

--------------------------------------------------------------------
ARRL Louisiana Section
Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR
k5jmr@arrl.org

Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter December 2019

ARRL LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER DECEMBER 2019

I hope that everyone had a good Christmas! 2020 is just around the
corner.  The Minden Hamfest was very successful and was well attended. 
Delta Director David Norris, K5UZ gave us a great ARRL update in the
ARRL forum.  Hammond Hamfest is January 18th….Hope to see many of you
there.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
***Collegiate Bowl on the Air
The four collegiate radio clubs for Louisiana State University (K5LSU),
Ohio State University (W8LT), Clemson University (WD4EOG), and
University of Oklahoma (W5TC) will be on the air on December 28th prior
to the start of the Collegiate Bowl Semifinal games.  All amateur
stations are welcome to contact the stations.  We would love to hear
from alumni of any collegiate club and from other school clubs.  Any
amateur station contacting all 4 club stations can receive a
certificate.
Time: 1500Z to maybe 2200Z on Dec 28th.
Bands: All except 60m.  Club stations will work in the General Class
sections of the HF bands.
Modes:  Phone, CW, Digital, as we feel like it.
Exchange:  RST Name QTH.
QSL:  For each of the four clubs, contact them directly for a QSL card.
The certificates will be handled by the Amateur Radio Society at LSU
(K5LSU).
Dana Browne, AD5VC
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NEW HAMS (as reported to the ARRL)
Report for 2019-12-03
Jesse L Coats, KI5HEC
Royce J Griffin, KI5HDD
Toby M Battaglia, KI5HDE
Jonathan S Eubanks, KI5HDF
Curtis E Montgomery, KI5HAY
Kevin P Jenkins, KI5HAZ
Ronnie P Voorhies, KI5HBA
Jared A Headrick, KI5HIS
Valerie K Taylor, KI5HFE
Nicholas J Perry, KI5HFF
Jason M Doucet, KI5HFD
Zachary L Carraway, KI5HFC
Steven A Rasberry, KI5HBV
Robert L Mccormick, KI5HBW
Michael P Krzystowczyk, KI5HIP
Nicholas R Mueller, KI5HIQ
Andrew R Schoonmaker, KI5HIR
Travis L Freese, KI5HIT
Taner M Crooks, KI5HCH
Collin Crooks, KI5HCF
Jonathan A Hawley, KI5HIU
Wyatt J Weeks, KI5HCG
Amy D Weeks, KI5HCI
Ethan J Weeks, KI5HIV
Callum Mitchel, KI5HCE
Christopher A Wright, KI5HDW
Aaron J Kerr, KI5HHA

License Upgrades (as reported to the ARRL)
Report for 2019-12-03
Paula R Hidalgo, KI5CDJ
Isabella M Dugas, KI5CKA
Lester J Zaunbrecher, KI5GIZ

New/Renewed ARRL Members (as reported to the ARRL)
Report for 2019-12-03
David R Wyatt, KI5FSQ
Joel P Graffagnino, AA5PZ
Travis B Perrilloux, KF5LIC
Leo Simanonok
Jonathan S Eubanks, KI5HDF
Richard D Suntken, KF5EQM
Peter M Dakin, KA5APE
Arthur L Clardy, AB5CV
Richard S Hendrix, K5KRG
Sandra Leblanc, KE5KJF
Albert S Fabacher, KF5WP
Allen D Redling, KG5DHX
Henry Schwenke, KE5WUB
Jimmy E Walters, N5JEW
Christopher A Wright, KI5HDW
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FROM THE ARRL:
YOTA Month Expanding into the Americas
12/02/2019
December is Youth on the Air (YOTA) Month, when stations operated by
young radio amateurs around the world will get on the air to celebrate
youth in amateur radio. YOTA Month began a few years ago in
International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region 1, and the concept has
now taken root in the Americas as YOTA Month in the Americas.
During YOTA Month, radio amateurs aged 25 and younger will be on the air
as special event stations during December on various bands and modes. In
the US, look for K8Y, K8O, K8T, and K8A. Elsewhere in the Americas,
VE7YOTA will be on the air from Canada. XR2YOTA in Chile has been added
to the list of youth stations in the Americas for YOTA Month. Young hams
in other countries may also join in. Listen for other YOTA Month
stations with “YOTA” suffixes.
For more information about YOTA in the Americas, contact YOTA Month in
the Americas Coordinator Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO, or YOTA in the Americas
Camp Director Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.
Participants earn certificates by working the various YOTA-suffix
stations on the air throughout December. Not a contest, the event is
aimed at getting as many youngsters on air from as many countries as
possible. The event takes place from 0000 UTC on December 1 until 2359
UTC on December 31.
Other special call signs planning to be on the air include 5B19YOTA,
7X2YOTA, 7X3YOTA, 9A19YOTA, DH0YOTA, E71YOTA, EF4YOTA, EG2YOTA, EI0YOTA,
EM5YOTA, EM6YOTA, ET3YOTA, GB19YOTA, HA6YOTA, HB9YOTA, HG0YOTA, II4YOTA,
II8YOTA, LY5YOTA, OH2YOTA, OL19YOTA, ON4YOTA, PA6YOTA, PD6YOTA, SH9YOTA,
TC19YOTA, TC3YOTA, TM19YOTA, YO0YOTA, YT19YOTA, ZL6YOTA and ZS9YOTA.
Most stations will put their logs on LoTW with paper cards available
through Club Log OQRS. QSL direct via M0SDV.— Thanks to YOTA and YOTA
in the Americas

Boy Scouts Report Increased JOTA 2019 Station Participation
12/03/2019
The Boy Scouts of America report that, although overall JOTA 2019
participation was down slightly from 2018, “our calculations show that
each station averaged an additional 13 people in attendance over 2019.
This shows an aggregate increase of 24% attendance per station, even
with our reported stations being down from 266 in 2018 to 201 in 2019."
The Scouts reported that 13,783 individuals took part in JOTA 2019, down
from 14,708 in 2018. 

US State Department Seeks Foreign Service Information Management
Technical Specialists – Radio
12/03/2019
The US Department of State is currently accepting applications for
Foreign Service Information Management Technical Specialists – Radio
(IMTS-R) positions. Foreign Service IMTS-Rs design, install, and
maintain radio and telecommunications systems. They provide radio
support for presidential, congressional, and other VIP visits. These
radio specialists work from a regional location, overseas or
domestically. Extensive travel is required to support radio
telecommunications systems, such as land mobile radio (LMR), HF, VHF,
and UHF radio networks at State Department missions around the world.
Potential applicants should read the vacancy announcement to ensure that
they meet all of the requirements before applying.
To begin the online application process, visit USAJOBS. The deadline to
submit completed applications is December 31, 2019. Applicants must be
US citizens, at least 20 years old to apply, and at least 21 years old
to be appointed. Applicants must also be available for worldwide service
and be able to obtain all required security, medical, and suitability
clearances.

Oldest Known US Ham Receives ARRL Centurion Award
12/04/2019
The oldest known US radio amateur, Cliff Kayhart, W4KKP, received his
ARRL Centurion Award plaque in November. The award recognizes hams who
have achieved centenarian status. Kayhart, who lives in White Rock,
South Carolina, is 108. The ARRL Board of Directors conferred the award
on Kayhart at its July 2019 meeting.
At the November meeting of the Dutch Fork Amateur Radio Group in Little
Mountain, South Carolina, ARRL Roanoke Division Director Bud Hippisley,
W2RU, headed an ARRL delegation that presented the Centurion Award
plaque to Kayhart, who was first licensed as W2LFE in 1937 (he’s also
held W9GNQ). With Hippisley were Roanoke Division Vice Director Bill
Morine, N2COP, and South Carolina Section Manager Marc Tarplee, N4UFP.
Kayhart served on Iwo Jima during World War II, shortly after the US
victory there, setting up long-range radio communication from the island
to Tokyo to arrange for the eventual surrender by Japan.
Kayhart remains active, checking into several nets from his assisted
living facility. Centurion Award recipients have their annual ARRL
membership fees waived while continuing to receive QST and other ARRL
member benefits. Kayhart was profiled in the June 2018 issue of QST.   

Dayton Hamvention Admission, Fees to Increase in 2020
12/05/2019
Dayton Hamvention® is increasing the cost of admission and its booth
fees. Hamvention General Chair Jack Gerbs, WB8SCT, announced this week
that general admission would rise by $4 per ticket to $26 in advance or
$31 at the gate for all 3 days. The cost of flea market spots will go up
by $5 per space, and inside exhibitors will pay $30 more.
“Hamvention has always strived to produce a very high-quality event
for amateur radio enthusiasts from around the globe,” Gerbs said.
“We have always felt it is imperative that we give back to amateur
radio at many levels. We have been very generous in our support over the
years.” Gerbs cited “the economic pressures to present a show like
Hamvention” as the reason for the price increases.
“The Hamvention Executive Team is asking for your support and
understanding as we move forward together,” he said.

Next Kids Day is Saturday, January 4
12/10/2019
The first Saturday in January is Kids Day — the time to get youngsters
on the air to share in the joy and fun that Amateur Radio can provide.
Kids Day gets under way on Saturday, January 4, at 1800 UTC and
concludes at 2359 UTC.
Sponsored by the Boring (Oregon) Amateur Radio Club, this event has a
simple exchange, suitable for younger operators: First name, age,
location, and favorite color. After that, the contact can be as long or
as short as each participant prefers. Kids Day is the perfect
opportunity to open your shack door and invite kids over to see what
Amateur Radio has to offer.
Details are on the ARRL website. 

ARRL Reshapes its Podcast Offerings for 2020
12/16/2019
In conjunction with the launch of its new On the Air magazine, which is
aimed at those just beginning their journey in amateur radio, ARRL is
reconfiguring its podcast lineup.
Heading up the new schedule will be a free companion podcast to the
bimonthly On the Air magazine. The “On the Air” podcast will take a
deeper look into select features and projects from the magazine. Each
month, host and On the Air Editorial Director Becky Schoenfeld, W1BXY,
will offer additional resources, techniques, and hints to help
less-experienced radio amateurs to get the most from the magazine’s
content.
In addition to the podcast, ARRL will introduce a free “On the Air”
blog featuring curated content from the communicators and makers who are
the driving force of amateur radio today. Curated by ARRL Product
Development manager Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R, the blog will highlight
opportunities and activities available to new licensees. The “On the
Air” blog is intended as an entry point into the world of amateur
radio for those seeking original voices and perspectives. Readers will
be invited to take part in the conversation by sharing their stories and
experiences.
ARRL’s current “So Now What?” podcast will cease production
in
January 2020, as the full complement of On the Air content is rolled
out. The catalog of “So Now What?” episodes is available for
listening or downloading.
In addition, “The Doctor is In” podcast, which has served
more-experienced amateurs since 2016, will conclude its 4-year run on
December 19, 2019. “Eclectic Tech,” a new bi-weekly podcast designed
to appeal to experienced amateurs, will launch in February 2020.
Hosted by QST Editor Steve Ford, WB8IMY, “Eclectic Tech” will
highlight technical topics involving amateur and non-amateur technology,
offer brief interviews with individuals involved in projects of interest
to amateurs, and include practical information of immediate benefit to
today’s hams.
“The Doctor is In” co-host Joel Hallas, W1ZR, is selecting some of
his favorite podcast episodes for re-broadcast in the interim between
the end of production for “The Doctor is In” and the debut of
“Eclectic Tech.” The complete “The Doctor is In” archive
is
available on the ARRL website. Hallas will continue to answer questions
about amateur radio in QST’s “The Doctor is In” column.
The “ARRL Audio News” podcast will continue to provide a weekly
summary of news and activities within the amateur radio community. 

FCC Formally Adopts Proposals to Remove Amateur 3-GHz Band, Invites
Comments
12/17/2019
At its December 12 meeting, the FCC formally adopted a Notice of
Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in WT Docket 19-348 and invited comments on
its plan to remove “existing non-federal secondary radiolocation and
amateur allocations” in the 3.3 – 3.55 GHz band and relocate
incumbent non-federal operations. The FCC said it’s seeking comment on
appropriate “transition mechanisms” to make that happen. ARRL has
indicated that it will file comments in opposition to the proposal. The
amateur 9-centimeter allocation is 3.3 – 3.5 GHz. The NPRM comes in
response to the MOBILE NOW [Making Opportunities for Broadband
Investment and Limiting Excessive and Needless Obstacles to Wireless]
Act, approved by the 115th Congress to make available new spectrum for
mobile and fixed wireless broadband use.
“By proposing to delete the existing non-federal secondary allocations
from the 3.3 – 3.55 GHz band, we are taking an important initial step
towards satisfying Congress’s directives and making as much as 250
megahertz of spectrum potentially available for advanced wireless
services, including 5G,” the FCC said in the Introduction to its
NPRM.
Currently, the entire 3.1 – 3.55 GHz band is allocated for both
federal and non-federal radiolocation services, with non-federal users
operating on a secondary basis to federal radiolocation services, which
have a primary allocation, the NPRM explains.
The FCC said it is seeking comment on relocating non-federal licensees
to another band. With respect to amateur operations, the FCC invited
comments on whether sufficient amateur spectrum exists in other bands
that can support the operations currently conducted at 3.3 – 3.5 GHz.
The 3.40 – 3.41 GHz segment is earmarked for amateur satellite
communication. “We seek comment on the extent to which the band is
used for this purpose, whether existing satellites can operate on other
amateur satellite bands, and on an appropriate timeframe for terminating
these operations in this band,” the FCC said. If non-federal licensees
are relocated to 3.1 – 3.3 GHz band, the FCC proposes that they
continue to operate on a secondary basis to federal operations,
consistent with current band allocations.
Some comments began to arrive before the FCC formally adopted the NPRM,
as it points out in a footnote. Kevin Milner, KD0MA, the
secretary/treasurer of the Ski Country Amateur Radio Club in Colorado,
has argued that the club’s equipment cannot be re-channeled below 3.4
GHz, and the club is seeking relocation costs. Devin Ulibarri, W7ND,
told the FCC that amateur networks in the current band cannot move
easily into other amateur allocations because there is no readily
available commercial equipment to support the bandwidth, the FCC
recounted.
In the event the proposed amendments are adopted, the FCC “seeks
comment on relocation options and on transition and protection
mechanisms for incumbent non-federal operations.”
Also at its December 12 meeting, the FCC considered another NPRM in WT
Docket 19-138 that would “take a fresh and comprehensive look” at
the rules for the 5.9 GHz band and propose, among other things, to make
the lower 45 MHz of the band available for unlicensed operations and to
permit “cellular vehicle-to-everything” (C-V2X) operations in the
upper 20 MHz of the band. The FCC is not proposing to delete or
otherwise amend the amateur allocation, which would continue as a
secondary allocation.
The Amateur Radio Emergency Data Network (AREDN) has offered its voice
in challenging the FCC proposals on the two bands, saying their adoption
would “eliminate our use of the most-effective resource hams have to
build its networks.”
“The AREDN Project is able to leverage low-cost commercial devices
solely because they are designed to operate on adjacent allocations,”
AREDN said on its website. “Moving to other allocations would be
difficult if not impossible without a complete redesign, manufacture,
purchase, and installation of new custom amateur hardware and
software…, raising the price out of reach for the typical ham.”
Interested parties may file short comments on WT Docket 19-348 via the
FCC’s Electronic Comment Filing Service (Express). Visit the FCC
“How to Comment on FCC Proceedings” page for information on filing
extended comments.

New Section Manager Will Take Over in North Carolina on April 1
12/27/2019
Marvin Hoffman, WA4NC, of Boone, North Carolina, will take the reins as
of the North Carolina ARRL Field Organization this spring. Hoffman was
the sole nominee to succeed incumbent Section Manager Karl Bowman,
W4CHX, of Raleigh, who decided not to run for a new term after serving
since 2014. Because no challengers came forward by the nomination
deadline, no contested SM elections will take place during the winter
election cycle.
These incumbent Section Managers will begin new terms in 2020: John
Fritze, K2QY, Eastern New York; George Miller, W3GWM, Eastern
Pennsylvania; John Mark Robertson, K5JMR, Louisiana; Joe Speroni, AH0A,
Pacific; Dave Kaltenborn, N8KBC, San Diego; Chris Stallkamp, KI0D, South
Dakota; and Joe Palsa, K3WRY, Virginia. New 2-year terms of office begin
on April 1.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
AROUND THE SECTION:

Region 2:  Please see the “Ascension Airwaves” at
K5ARC.org….always jammed pack full of info…….

Region 4:
Volume 59, Number 12 ACADIANA AMATEUR RADIO ASSOC., INC. - December
2019
Thank you to the Acadiana Amateur Radio Association from the Tour du
Teche – 2019 From Gustave (Tave) Lamperez Tour du Teche Race Director
dated 11/08/2019 Larry and Sandy Leblanc, The Tour du Teche held its
10th event this year, 2019. As the new Race Director of this wonderful
event, I want to thank the Acadiana Amateur Radio Association for your
many years of service to our event. I have run many races over my 40
plus years of participating in canoe and kayak races. I have seen when a
race does not have the expertise in communication to make sure that all
racers are located and safe, your team makes difference. Thank you for
your help and experience we really depend on your team to keep our
racers and volunteers safe. Your support at our checkpoints is
indispensable, your help ensures the high quality event we host every
year. Please share our appreciation with all of your members. Gustave
(Tave) Lamperez Tour du Teche Race Director

VE Test Session 7 November 2019 73, de Greg ~ K5LFT It was another great
night. We had 4 come in without a ticket & 4 go out with a Tech license.
One came in a Tech & out a General , hence a great night. Those earning
a Tech were : Valerie K. Taylor ~ KI5HFE~ of Kaplan along with her son
Nicholas J. Perry ~KI5HFF~ also of Kaplan. Two others were: Jason M.
Doucet ~KI5HFD~ of New Iberia & Zachary L. Carroway ~KI5HFC~ of Ville
Platte. The gentleman upgrading to General was Lester J. Zaunbrecher
~KI5GIZ~ of Arnauldville. The VEs involved were: Greg ~ K5LFT, Michael ~
KI5ARX & Tom ~ W5OHJ. Great big TNX to the VEs & Congratulations to the
new hams & the Upgrader!!!!!

Silent Key - Larry Leblanc KE5KJD Larry LeBlanc KE5KJD became a Silent
Key on November 13, 2019 after suffering a major stroke. His service to
the Tour du Teche canoe races, to ham radio in general, and to the AARA
club will be greatly missed. He started out in radio in 1970 as a Novice
with call WN5GHC, operating on mainly CW with a homemade multiband
vertical in Richardson, Texas. He had been operating in his hometown of
Breaux Bridge, Louisiana as KE5KJD on various bands. Larry loved to try
experimentation to help his own radio operation. His beloved wife Sandy
KE5KJF also operated radio with him and helped tremendously with the
Tour du Teche races.

Technical Presentation Battery Technology by Mike Cavell KI5ARX Mike
Cavell KI5ARX gave an excellent presentation on battery technology. He
provided a very good layman’s level explanation of many considerations
individuals should address when selecting battery systems. The many
considerations discussed include, but were not limited to, the
following: Watt hours per volume Watt hours per weight Cost per watt
hour Useable watt hours (battery life) Memory effects Charge / discharge
cycles Voltage considerations Charging considerations Battery management
systems Solar charging systems Failure mode considerations DC / DC
converters Form factors Handling safety An audio recording of his
presentation and the slides he used during the presentation have been
uploaded to the club website at www.w5ddl.org. They are listed on the
“ARTICLES OF INTEREST” page. Audio recording of presentation: Audio
recording mp3 Slideshow presentation: Slideshow presentation

UPCOMING EVENTS 
Winter Field Day January 25 At Steve Webre’s in Church Point 
AARA Hamfest March 13-14, 2020 Rayne, LA 
For any additional information, check the W5DDL.org website AARA
Christmas Party December 12, 2019 

Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie 1 Chocolate pie crust 1 Cup peanut butter 1
8-oz package cream cheese – softened 1 1/4 Cup powdered sugar 1 8-oz
package whipped topping – thawed Beat peanut butter and cream cheese
until smooth. Add powered sugar and beat until smooth. Add in thawed
whipped topping and beat until smooth, scrapping sides as needed.. Pour
filling into crust, even out the top with spatula or knife. Chill at
least one hour before serving. This has become one of our favorites in
my family. Ultra-rich. You may only want to offer small slivers – your
guests will thank you. NOTE: Although you can use the “LITE” version
of the whipped topping, avoid the “No-fat” versions. The flavor is
not the same.

Region 6:
From:  The Brass Key January 2020 A Publication of the Central Louisiana
Amateur Radio Club
January 2020 Our esteemed and talented Editor will strive to get this
issue out before Christmas, so assuming that will be the case, Merry
Christmas, and Happy New Year! For all of you who have alleged that you
will come from the dark side and begin to operate in the preferred mode,
CW, your opportunity to get your feet wet is upon us. ARRL Straight Key
Night (SKN) runs from 00:00 UTC until 23:59 UTC on 01/01/20. So, knock
the rust and dust off your key and get ready. I will use my World War II
vintage J-38, which is my favorite straight key, anyway. SKN is not a
contest, but you can submit a log to ARRL if you want to. There is no
formal format or official exchange for SKN QSOs. It is designed to
provide some relaxing time on the air. Details are on the ARRL website.
Following SKN is the Straight Key Century Club (SKCC) K3Y event. It
resembles the Original 13 Colonies and Route 66 events. There will be
K3Y stations in each of the ten U.S. call areas as well as KH6, KL7, and
KP4, and they will identify as K3Y/# where # signifies the call area in
which that station is located. There will be a few DX stations
designated as well. This event runs during the month of January. The
idea is to work as many of the K3Y stations as possible. QSL card and
certificates for various levels of “sweeps” will be available.
Details on the SKCC website. A big thanks to the intrepid members of the
Repeater Committee for bring our primary VHF repeater and the UHF
repeater back to life in mid-December. Don’t forget about Winter Field
Day. The on-air operation commences at 1:00 PM local time on Saturday,
01/25/20. Setup will be Friday afternoon. We plan to have a gumbo social
early Saturday evening. We have a great operating venue. More detailed
information elsewhere in this issue of the Brass Key. What do you want
out of Central Louisiana Amateur Radio Club? 73 and good DX! John, N5CM

A SKYWARN Net was activated during the tornado/severe weather outbreak
Monday, December 16th. At around 12:00 noon, weather conditions
warranted the activation of the net on CLARC's 147.330 repeater by Net
Control Scott, KD5DFL. The National Weather Service reports the EF 3
tornado traveled 63 miles, from Deridder to Alexandria/Pineville. The
tornado touched down just west of Alexandria, causing considerable
damage to the Coliseum Boulevard area of Alexandria, before traveling
East to Pineville, causing considerable damage to the Edgewood Drive and
Donahue Ferry area. The net deactivated around 3 pm as the severity of
the weather decreased. Eleven hams either checked into the net or
reported on events (hail, trees down, homes damaged, etc.) in their
area. Participants in the net were: Dennis/W5LD, Greg/N5GSR,
Steve/KE5IAK, John/N5CM, Bobby/KB5DOG, Don/KI5AJV, Stacy/KG5KGU,
Jack/W5ETL, Terry/AB5JH, and Jim/AB5JM, Scott/KD5DFL, Net Control Many
thanks to Scott, KD5DFL, for serving as net control during this
emergency, and to all hams who participated. These volunteers helped to
keep our community safe by providing timely and accurate reports of
severe weather to the National Weather Service.

Winter Field Day (WFD) will be held on Saturday, January 25, 2020 at
19:00 UTC (1:00 PM local time) through Sunday, January 26, 2020 at 19:00
UTC (1:00 PM local time). The Central Louisiana Amateur Radio Club
(CLARC) will operate Winter Field Day and have our Winter Social at the
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Woodworth Outdoor
Education Center at 661 Robinson Bridge Road in Woodworth. Robinson
Bridge Road is also known as Louisiana Highway 3265. If you’re coming
from Alexandria on U.S. 165, turn left at the one and only traffic light
in the Greater Woodworth Metroplex. If you’re coming in on I-49, take
the Woodworth Exit (73). Don’t speed in Woodworth. The Winter Gumbo
Social will commence at 6:00 PM on Saturday. The club plans to provide a
gumbo. We will need people to bring potato salad or other side dishes
and some desserts. You do not have to operate on air to participate in
the social. Please e-mail Lisa KW5LC if you plan to attend the social,
how many people, and if you will be bringing something. We must know how
many to plan for. KW5LC@outlook.com We will commence set-up operations
on Friday afternoon, January 24, 2020 and continue on Saturday morning.
Specific times to be announced. We will need help to set up on Friday
the 24th and take-down on Sunday the 26th. Another announcement with
specific times will be sent out closer to the event. **PLEASE remember
to let Lisa, KW5LC, know in advance if you plan on attending the gumbo
social and what you would like to contribute as a side dish:
kw5lc@outlook.com.

Region 9:
From: The SELARC "Hamster"
________________________________________
*Serving Amateur Radio Since 1974*
Published Monthly by the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club Inc.
P.O. Box 1324, Hammond LA 70404
Visit our website: www.selarc.org
Vol. 46, No. 12 ......................... December 2019

SELARC 2020 Hamfest
As a reminder, The SELARC Hamfest on January 18, 2020, in Hammond is
just a month away, and the club is still in need of many more ticket
sales. Please contact Ernie Bush to obtain more tickets to sell or email
us to request.
The 4 main prizes for tickets also listed on the SELARC Hamfest page -
main prize winners do not need to be present at the drawing and if a
non-ham wins can receive the cash value equivalent shown in place of
item, prizes include:
o	1st Prize: Yaesu FT-450D or $500
o	2nd Prize: Yaesu FTM-400XDR or $350
o	3rd Prize: AA-230 Zoom Antennae Analyzer or $200
o	4th Prize: Yaesu FT-70DR or $100
Please email us if you have questions about the event or for any more
information needed to sell tickets.
Special Events, Other Hamfests & VE Sessions
MARA Christmas Hamfest - Minden, LA - Dec 21, 2019
SELARC - 39th Annual Hammond Hamfest
Hammond VE Group - ARRL/W5YI tests are scheduled for the last Sunday of
each month [with the exception of holiday conflicts] in Room "B" of the
North Oaks Medical System Diagnostic Center at 2pm with $15 testing fee.
Bring photo ID and any appropriate CSCE. For more information contact
n5xes@arrl.net or Find an Amateur Radio License Exam in Your Area.
AMSAT 50th Anniversary Awards Program for contacts 3/3/19 to 12/31/19
Happy Birthday
Birthday Wishes for November go out to - Elizabeth KM6MWZ, Larry KJ6SET,
and Carol KE5GOC.
If we missed your birthday, then please let us know.
Get Well Soon —
Best wishes for continued recuperation go to SELARC members Tom Simpson
N5HAY and Homer Jones KA5TRT. We look forward to hearing you on the
air!
VE Session Results
Congratulations to the following new Amateur Radio Operators and
upgrades!!
Technician
Sebastian Schoegl - Baton Rouge, La.
Leo Schoegl - Baton Rouge, La.
Donald Hendrix - Gretna, La.
Extra
Timothy Lynch / KG5QDO - Hammond, La.
Again, many thanks to all VEs' who make the effort to make these
sessions a success!
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Louisiana Traffic Managers Report: November 2019
Sessions QNI QTC QTR
17.            414 37    442
73,
Jimmy Lewis/AB5YS Louisiana Section Traffic Manager
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ARES Monthly Section Emergency Coordinators Report
1. ARRL: Section  Louisiana
2. Month:  November
3. Year:  2019
4. Total number of ARES members:  424
5. Number of DECs/ECs reporting this month:   9
6. Number of ARES nets active:   49
7. Number of nets with NTS liaison:   3
8. Calls of DECs/EC reporting: W4NDF KD5MLD KD5BNH KE5BMS AG5LR KD5DFL
W5GAS KD5IGZ KE5GMN
 9a. Number of exercises & training sessions this month:      31
  9b.  Person hours:   334
10a. Number of public service events this month:    1   10b. Person
hours:    24
11a. Number of emergency operations this month:    0
11b. Person hours:   0
12a. Number of SKYWARN operations this month:   2
 12b. Person hours:  10
13a. Auto Sum 9a, 10a, 11a, 12a:   34
 13b. Auto Sum 9b,
        10b, 11b, 12b:    368

Jim Coleman, AI5B
Louisiana Section Emergency Coordinator 
ARES
December ARRL LA Section Book Giveaway winners are:
ARRL Affiliated Club is Shreveport Amateur Radio Assn.(SARA).
ARRL Member is Herman Campbell KN5GRK.
Congratulations to our winners! Next drawing January 1, 2020.

New Louisiana Section Public Information Officer(PIO) appointments:
Region 1 Joey Falgout N5TWR
Region 2 Elmer Tatum N5EKF
Region 7 Marcel Livesay N5VU
Please congratulate and welcome these 3 fellows as you see them.
While the PIO positions are located under ARES on the website (
laarrl.org ) this is a Section appointment and while ARES is important;
so are things going on around the Section with people, clubs, events,
Skywarn, bike races, any and all things you consider newsworthy and want
to see put out for everyone to see.....If you have no one assigned to
your Region or area please feel free to contact any other PIO or our PIC
Joe Holland, KB5VJY. We have had more interest in the PIO positions so
look for future announcements on that.

Congratulations to John Beck, KB5LE on your Special Service Award for
your assistance with HAM operations at NWS Shreveport! John has been Mr.
Reliable for gathering radio reports for our Skywarn program over the
last year. #skywarn19 #SRD2019

Thanks to all of our spotters and radio operators for coming out for
Skywarn Recognition Day! We appreciate what you do! #skywarn19 #SRD2019

Congratulations to Joey Falgout, N5TWR for getting the most "likes" in
our first "Caption the Meme" contest....Joey received a box of ARRL
goodies for his winning caption....!!! Please be looking out for the
next contest on the ARRL Louisiana Section Facebook page.

Upcoming Hamfests:
39th Annual Hammond Hamfest
01/18/2020
Location: Pennington Student Activity Center
1350 North General Pershing Drive
Hammond, LA 70401
Website: http://www.selarc.org
Sponsor: Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club, Inc.
Talk-In: 147.000 / -600khz (PL 107.2)
Public Contact: Tyrone Burns , N5XES Phone: 985-687-2139 Email:
n5xes@arrl.net

With no opposition; I was re-elected to another 2 year term as Section
Manager beginning April 1, 2020. I am truly honored to be your Section
Manager and look forward to the next two years. I thank you for all the
support since April 2018.
73,

--------------------------------------------------------------------
ARRL Louisiana Section
Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR
k5jmr@arrl.org
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter November 2019

Subject: Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter November 2019

HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO ALL!
SILENT KEYS:
William McMullan, KE5L
Joan Haro, WA5WGA

NEW HAMS: As reported to the ARRL
Report for 2019-11-05
Addison J Bute, KI5GTI
Kade P Fontenot, KI5GZP
Clarence E Ferguson, KI5GSN
Ryan J Baiad, KI5GZO
Robert Gray, KI5GYO
Alicia R Roberts, KI5GZN
Jonathan C Sagona, KI5GYR
Asa W Judd, KI5GYQ
Steven W Chisam, KI5GYN
Elliot E Allen, KI5GYM
Michael E Schaumburg, KI5GYS
Joseph A Wambach, KI5GRA

LICENSE UPGRADES: As reported to the ARRL
Report for 2019-11-05
Michael O Jackson, KI5GGP
Grantham P Frederick, KI5GBD
Maurice A Hawley, KG5VRR
Neal A Jaber, KG5LWP

New/Renewed ARRL Members:  As reported to the ARRL
Report for 2019-11-05
William E Burke, W5XNO
Frank P Boimare, KI5FUH
Thomas J Wimprine, KB5LBV
Larry D Wilson, KC5OOX
Robert Struppeck, AF6UK
Jacob A Coreil, KG5UEK
William A Hoover, AG5LR
Robert G Bishop, N5JMB
Jimmy L Miller, N0MSW
Randy LeJeune
David M Armstrong, WB5VDG
David L Armstrong, AA5HY
Jerry W Dukes, KI5GLY
Glynn A Davis, KD5SII
Stephen L Cook, KB0TWL
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FROM THE ARRL:

Hiram Percy Maxim Birthday Celebration Results and Certificates Now
Available
10/30/2019
Results and certificates from the Hiram Percy Maxim (HPM) Birthday
Celebration August 31 – September 8 are now available. The 9-day
operating event commemorated the 150th anniversary of the birth of ARRL
cofounder and first president Hiram Percy Maxim, W1AW. Amateurs from 57
ARRL/RAC sections and four countries submitted more than 25,000 contacts
over the course of the event. Results of the event and downloadable
certificates are on the ARRL Contests Page.
A special HPM 150 QSL card is available for stations that worked
W1AW/150 during the event. To receive a card, send your QSL with an SASE
to W1AW, 225 Main St., Newington, CT 06111. 

W1AW to Commemorate 98th Anniversary of First Amateur Radio Signals to
Span the Atlantic
11/06/2019
December 11 marks the 98th anniversary of the success of ARRL’s
Transatlantic Tests in 1921, organized to see if low-power amateur radio
stations could be heard across the Atlantic using shortwave frequencies
(i.e., above 200 meters). On that day, a message transmitted by a group
of Radio Club of America members at 1BCG in Greenwich, Connecticut, was
copied by Paul Godley, 2ZE, in Scotland.
While the first two-way contact would not take place until 1923, the
1921 transatlantic success marked the beginning of what would become
routine communication between US radio amateurs and those in other parts
of the world — literally the birth of DX.
To commemorate this amateur radio milestone, Maxim Memorial Station W1AW
will be on the air through the day on December 11 with volunteer
operators. The goal is to encourage contacts between radio amateurs in
the US and Europe while showcasing the significance of the transmissions
that pioneered global communication and laid the groundwork for
technology widely used today. The event will run from 1300 until 0000
UTC. Some details are still being worked out, but operation will focus
on 40 and 20 meters (SSB).
Contact Clark Burgard, N1BCG, for more information. 

Dayton Hamvention® Invites 2020 Award Nominations
11/14/2019
Dayton Hamvention® is inviting nominations for its 2020 awards.
Nominations are due by February 15, 2020. Awards will be granted for
Amateur of the Year, Club of the Year, Technical Achievement, and
Special Achievement.
The Amateur of the Year Award is given to a radio amateur who has made a
long-term commitment to the advancement of amateur radio. This
individual will have a history of ham radio contributions and
demonstrated dedication to service, professionalism, and the advancement
of the avocation of amateur radio.
The Club of the Year will be honored for clearly demonstrating its
involvement in varied aspects of amateur radio for the greater good of
their community and/or nation.
The Technical Achievement Award recognizes a radio amateur who has
achieved technical excellence in the world of amateur radio. Examples
are inventions, processes, discoveries, experiments, and other technical
accomplishments or achievements that contributed to amateur radio.
The Special Achievement Award recognizes a radio amateur who has made an
outstanding contribution to the advancement of the radio art and/or
science. This award is usually given to a respected amateur who
spearheaded a single significant project.
Nomination forms are specific to the award. At a minimum, each form
should be completed with the information indicated. Provide contact
information for the person making the nomination. Submit forms via email
or via USPS to Hamvention, Attention: Awards Committee, Box 964, Dayton,
Ohio 45401-0964.
The Awards Committee will make its selections and announce the
recipients along with details on their accomplishments. An honors
convocation and award presentation will be held on the Saturday evening
of Hamvention. Award presentations will also take place at Hamvention on
Sunday afternoon, prior to the prize award activity.
For more information, contact the Dayton Hamvention Awards Committee.

Youth on the Air Camp Coming to the Americas
11/14/2019
The Electronic Applications Radio Service has announced that the first
Youth On The Air (YOTA) camp in the United States will be taking place
next June. Sponsors hope the camp will become an annual event.
The inaugural summer camp will take place June 21 – 26 at the National
Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting in West Chester Township, Ohio.
The West Chester Amateur Radio Association (WC8VOA) will host the event.
Operating the camp will be Electronic Applications Radio Service, Inc.
(EARS), a 501(c)(3) charitable organization dedicated to wireless
technologies and activities.
According to the announcement, the camp will focus on building peer and
mentor relationships and taking amateur radio “to the next level.”
Campers will attend workshops and activities in multiple STEM-related
subjects, such as radio contesting, electronic kit building, D-Star,
APRS, satellite communication, antenna building, and radio direction
finding and orienteering. A high-altitude balloon launch is also being
planned. Campers will learn and exercise on-the-air skills at special
event station W8Y.
Contributors include Icom America, Heil Sound Ltd., X-Tronic, and R&L
Electronics. Major financial supporters so far include the ARRL
Foundation, the Yasme Foundation, the World Wide Radio Operators
Foundation, Orlando HamCation and Orlando Amateur Radio Club, the
Northern California DX Foundation, Dayton Hamvention and the Dayton
Amateur Radio Association, the Huntsville Hamfest, Southwest Ohio DX
Association, Radio Amateurs of Canada, and Gary West, K8DEV, and Dee Dee
West, KA8DXE.
For more information, email Camp Director Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, or call
(812) 327-0749.

More than 1 Million Contacts Logged during ARRL Field Day 2019
11/14/2019
ARRL Contest Program Manager Paul Bourque, N1SFE, reports that nearly
1.1 million contacts were made during the 2019 ARRL Field Day — the
most popular operating event in North America. Bourque reported the 2019
ARRL Field Day results, which are available starting on page 64 of the
digital edition of the December 2019 issue of QST. Bourque says in his
article that more than 36,000 radio amateurs took part in ARRL Field Day
2019 across all 83 ARRL/Radio Amateurs of Canada sections, up slightly
from the 35,250 reported last year. The total number of contacts was
down by about 7% from 2018’s 1.18 million contacts.
“This year, 3,113 entries were received from local clubs and emergency
operations centers (EOCs), as well as individual portable, mobile, and
home stations,” Bourque wrote in QST. Most entries were in Class A
—
club or non-club groups of three or more.
Of the nearly 1.1 million contacts, approximately 46% were made on
phone, and 456,000 (42%) of contacts were made on CW. The remaining
138,000+ (12%) of the contacts were made on digital modes, such as FT8
and RTTY.
“This is a substantial increase compared to 2018, when total QSOs on
the digital modes numbered just over 56,000,” Bourque reported.
“With the last 2018 release of WSJT-X (which now supports Field Day
exchanges), many participants made use of FT8’s ability to communicate
when band conditions weren’t being cooperative.”
Top 10 scores ranged between W3AO’s Class 14A entry from Maryland-DC,
with 32,356 points, to W1NVT’s 14,876-point Class 2A entry from
Vermont.
Bourque said that 95% of the 3,113 entries received came through the
Field Day web applet.
“Not only is ARRL Field Day an opportunity to sharpen operating skills
in temporary and portable locations, it’s also an occasion to showcase
amateur radio to the local community, with clubs often setting up in
publicly accessible locations and interacting with non-hams,” Bourque
wrote.
Soapbox comments for Field Day 2019 are available on the ARRL website.
ARRL Field Day 2020 will take place June 27 – 28.

Nominations Invited for CWops Award for Advancing the Art of CW
11/18/2019
CWops is now accepting nominations for its Award for Advancing the Art
of CW for 2020. The award recognizes individuals, groups, or
organizations that have made the greatest contribution(s) toward
advancing the art or practice of radio communication by Morse code.
Candidates for the award may be authors of publications related to CW;
CW recruiters, trainers, mentors, coaches, and instructors; public
advocates of CW; organizers of CW activities; designers and inventors
who advance the art or practice of CW, and other contributors to the art
or practice of CW. The award is not limited to radio amateurs or their
organizations.
Email nominations with a copy to the CWops secretary. To be considered,
a nomination must be received by March 18, 2020. It should include
name(s) and call sign(s), if applicable, of nominee(s), and complete
contact information. A detailed explanation supporting the nomination
should be included along with the name, telephone number, email address,
and call sign of the person submitting the nomination. An award
presentation will take place at the 2020 Dayton Hamvention®.

Melissa Stemmer Joins ARRL Headquarters as Development Manager
11/18/2019
Connecticut native Melissa Stemmer has joined the ARRL Headquarters
staff as Development Manager. Born and raised in Waterbury, Stemmer
earned a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy from the University of
Connecticut in 1998, and she worked in that field for more than 15
years. After deciding that a career change was in order, Stemmer went
back to school, earning a master’s in organizational leadership in
2015 from Quinnipiac University. 
“I am so excited to be on this journey at ARRL, and I am looking
forward to getting to know everyone,” Stemmer said 
Before coming to ARRL, she was the development director at Seven Angels
Theatre in Waterbury. In September 2015, Stemmer signed on as
coordinator of the theatre’s annual High School Halo Awards — the
largest high school theatre award program in Connecticut. 
During her tenure at Seven Angels Theatre, Stemmer was an active member
of the Waterbury Regional Chamber and the Waterbury Exchange Club. She
served on the executive committee and governing council of the Arts and
Culture Collaborative of the Waterbury Region and was a member of the
Young Professionals Task Force of the Waterbury Region.

ARRL Legislative Advocacy Committee Drafting New Bill Addressing Antenna
Restrictions
11/21/2019
The ARRL Board of Directors Legislative Advocacy Committee is in the
process of drafting a new bill to address the issue of private land-use
restrictions on amateur radio antennas. The proposed legislation would
be the successor to the Amateur Radio Parity Act. The Legislative
Advocacy Committee, chaired by Pacific Division Director Jim Tiemstra,
K6JAT, will report to the Board soon, once plans are fleshed out.
Tiemstra told the ARRL Executive Committee (EC) on October 12 in Aurora,
Colorado, that Advocacy Committee members have traveled to Washington to
meet on multiple occasions with members of Congress and their staffs to
inform them of the committee’s plans.
ARRL Washington Counsel Dave Siddall, K3ZJ, told the EC last month that
he understands the conditional exemption of amateur radio licensees from
the RF exposure measurement requirements in the FCC’s Part 97 Amateur
Service rules is proposed to be removed. A Report and Order in FCC
Docket WT 13-84 is making the rounds that, if adopted, would make
amateur licensees subject to the same requirements as all other FCC
licensees. The Report and Order is expected to be released before
year’s end.
Siddall also reported to the EC that the FCC is poised to address the
60-meter band amateur allocation adopted at World Radiocommunication
Conference 2015 (WRC-15). The National Telecommunications and
Information Administration (NTIA), on behalf of US government primary
users of the band, has insisted that the maximum permitted power for
radio amateurs must not exceed that agreed to at WRC-15 — 15 W
effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) or 9.1 W ERP — despite the
fact that Canada has authorized its amateur licensees to use 100 W, and
eliminate the current discrete channels, which ARRL’s petition
proposed to retain. NTIA oversees federal government frequency
allocations and users.
Minutes of the October 12 Executive Committee meeting were posted this
week on the ARRL website.

ARRL Self-Guided Emergency Communication Course EC-001-S is Now
Available On Demand
11/21/2019
ARRL’s EC-001-S online “Introduction to Emergency
Communication”
course is now available to students in an on-demand format, allowing
students to register for the course and begin work at any time. This
course is designed to provide basic knowledge and tools for any
emergency communications volunteer.
In response to the great course demand and to expand access to EC-001,
ARRL developed a self-guided version of the course, EC-001-S, which
launched in June. This version of the course is designed for those who
prefer to work independently and who do not need guidance from an online
mentor. EC-001-S was previously offered only during specific sessions
along with the traditional mentored version. The course opened for
general enrollment on November 6.
Visit the ARRL Online Course Registration page for more information and
to register.

FCC Invites Comments on Digital AM Broadcasting Proposal
11/26/2019
The FCC has invited comments on a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM),
that would allow AM broadcasters to transmit an all-digital signal using
the HD Radio in-band on-channel (IBOC) mode, known as MA3.1
“We tentatively conclude that a voluntary transition to all-digital
broadcasting has the potential to benefit AM stations and provide
improved AM service to the listening public,” the FCC said. “We seek
comments on proposed operating standards for all-digital stations and
the impact of such operations on existing analog stations and
listeners.”
The proceeding was initiated by a March 2019 Petition for Rulemaking
(Petition) filed by Bryan Broadcasting Corporation. “This proceeding
continues the Commission’s efforts to improve and update the AM radio
service to provide a better listening experience for consumers and
enhanced service offerings, as part of our continuing effort to
revitalize AM broadcasting,” the FCC said in the introduction to the
NPRM.
Comments are due 60 days after the NPRM appears in The Federal Register.



AROUND THE SECTION:
Region 2:
Check out the latest “Ascension Airwaves” at K5ARC.org. 
It’s jammed packed with great stuff!

Region 3:
4th Quarter 2019 Update
The Fourth Quarter of 2019 is shaping up to be a busy time of year.
Not only do we nominate and elect officers for the upcoming year this
quarter, we also vote on Ham of the Year Award and host our annual
Christmas Party.
And, this quarter (October) we also finally installed the much awaited
147.330+ (CTCSS 114.8) at its new location at Chabert Hospital in east
Houma, LA near the Houma Airbase. A DB-224E antenna was installed at
roughly 100 feet HAAT atop a Rohn-25G tower on the roof of the building.
 Utilizing new 1/2" Rosenberger heliax and fittings, a previously unused
Yaesu DR-1X System Fusion repeater was installed by our motley crew.
A Job Well Done and Thanks go to all who participated!!
This repeater is operating strictly in the analog mode, giving us
additional coverage for both daily and emergency amateur radio use.
Also in October we received a request from the owners of the tower
hosting our Gray repeater, 147.390+ (CTCSS 114.8), to install our own
electrical service at the site and begin paying our own utility fees
directly with the electric company.
Within 3 weeks, we secured the permit, installed the hardware, and
facilitated the power company hook-up to begin using our own power. Once
again, many Thanks to All who contributed to the cause!!
As always, we enjoy the company of fellow Hams and their family and
loved oved ones, as well as the great food, at our monthly Dinner
Socials in Houma and Thibodaux!!
George Tippett, WB5PKK
President
Thibodaux Amateur Radio Club
aka Bayou Region Amateur Radio Society (501c3)
http://www.w5yl.org/

Region 4:
From:  Volume 59, Number 10 ACADIANA AMATEUR RADIO ASSOC., INC. - a
501(c)3 Corporation October 2019
October 4–6, 2019 by Larry KE5KJD and Sandy LeBlanc KE5KJF The Tour du
Teche Canoe Race is a 135 mile race from Port Barre, LA, to Berwick, LA.
The race has introduced paddlers and eco-tourists to the recreational,
cultural, and economic value of the bayou for local residents. The three
day race with stops in St. Martinville, Franklin, and finishing in
Berwick has turned into a paddling marathon as well as a 3 day party for
towns along the route with families along the route cheering for the
paddlers. In the past we have had paddlers from Mexico City, Canada.
Australia, Thailand, Germany, and others. The boats range from solo
paddlers with a single blade paddle, to the Big boats with 3-6 paddlers
with single or double paddles. Two years ago a boat with 4 paddlers won
the 135 mile race in the Big Boat Division in 17:54:04, with an average
of 6.03 mph. Shorter races include: Crawfish – Port Barre to
Poche’s
– 30 miles; Acadian – Port Barre to St. Martinville – 49
miles;
Hot Sauce – St. Martinville to New Iberia – 24 miles; Sugar
– St.
Martinville to Franklin – 59 miles; Black Bear – New Iberia to
Franklin – 35 miles; and the Oil and Gas – Franklin to Berwick
–
27 miles. There will be events up and down the bayou in conjunction with
the race. There was a band and some vendors and a gumbo cook-off in St.
Martinville. The Chitimacha tribe had a lot of festivals and food at
their check point. Franklin had vendors, a homemade boat exhibit
(wonderful), and a voucher for a meal. Berwick had a carnival along with
vendors with food, crafts, and clothing at the finish line. People sit
on their wharf and hand out water and cookies along the way. As we have
in the last eight years, the AARA ham club provides communications
support for the race. The Command Center (Crawfish Hole) is a mobile
trailer that was set up in Port Barre, St. Martinville, Franklin, and
Berwick. Larry LeBlanc KE5KJD and Sandy LeBlanc KE5KJF are coordinators
for the AARA ham club. The club’s task included verifying boat numbers
and times, and the status of individual paddlers and canoes along the
route from Port Barre to Berwick. Along with tracking canoes, the club
uses the event to host HF contacts along the route.
The Tour du Teche qualified as a Special Event with the ARRL and was
listed in the QST. If you would like to participate in the Special
Event, come to any checkpoint, set up your station, and send your log to
Chris Ancelet N5MCY for QSL card verification. See W5DDL,org for
details. Mr. Ray Pellerin along with Larry KE5KJD and Sandy LeBlanc
KE5KJF would like to thank the members of the AARA who have volunteered
to help with communications for Tour du Teche X. We have 17 participants
this year. They are: Glen Thibodeaux KF5FNP, David McCutchen KG5JHR,
Herman Campbell KN5GRK, Tom Dischler W5OHJ, Paula Romero KF5CNS, Nick
Pugh K5QXJ, JoAnn Pugh KE5RPI, Danny Daigle KD5JSM, Kathy Daigle KD5TJZ,
Galen Wilson KF5BET, Abbi Wilson KF5BEW, Kendra Wilson KF5FYS, Brandon
Stelly KG5LQM, Ric Wallace KF5KEL, and Jackie Wallace KF5PCH. If you
would like to volunteer, contact Sandy LeBlan KE5KJD (337) 254-1061.
Again Larry and I would like to thank everyone for volunteering. See you
on the Bayou. Sad to say, this will be our last year to coordinate the
communications for the Tour du Teche race. If anyone would like to
assume the job let me know. We will help with the transition. Sandy and
Larry LeBlanc Communications Coordinators Tour de Teche 135 Race

BEEF MEAT BALLS AND GRAVY 1-1/2 Pounds 85/15 Ground Beef 1 Pkg, Onion
Soup Mix 1 can Cream of Mushroom Soup Water Salt, Pepper, Granulated
Onion, Granulated Garlic Vegetable Oil Season the ground meat with salt,
pepper, granulated onion and granulated garlic. Make 1” diameter balls
of the ground meat. Put 1/2” of oil in a Dutch oven and bring up to
temperature. Brown the meatballs, in two batches, turning once, and then
put on paper toweling. Pour out all oil, and put 1/2 cup of water in
pot. Return to medium heat and “grab-up” all the
“goodies”. Put
the meat balls, mushroom soup + a can of water, onion soup mix, 1/4
teaspoon of pepper, 1/2 teaspoon of granulated onion powder and a 1/2
teaspoon salt into the pot. Bring to a boil and simmer for 30 minutes.
Serve over steamed rice.

Update:  HERMAN CAMPBELL, KN5GRK
On Sept 11, I fell in my yard and broke my right foot and fractured my
left collar bone, spent 2 months in hospital for surgery and therapy.  I
have been home two weeks and just now trying to catch up on my e-mails. 
I have not been able to run my reflector or answer e-mails.  Please bear
with me, it may take a while.  I am scheduled to have prostrate surgery
on December 4.  I will try to answer some of my e-mails as soon as
possible.
Thanks for all the prayers and wishes for Ramona KG5HNO and me Herman
KN5GRK.

B.E.A.R.S.
St. Mary Parish
Jim Coleman, Keith Barnes and I were able to attend the B.E.A.R.S
meeting recently in Morgan City and make the official presentation to
our 2019 LA Section Amateur of the Year, Jackie Price, KA5LMZ.  As many
of you know Jackie is the leader of her club and the EC for St. Mary
ARES.  We were treated to a very tasty brunch before the meeting and Jim
Coleman gave the group a really nice ARES presentation.  Congratulations
Jackie and thanks again for the wonderful welcome and hospitality as
always!

Region 6:
THE BRASS KEY
December 2019 A Publication of the Central Louisiana Amateur Radio Club
The BRASS KEY is published monthly as its official journal by the
Central Louisiana Amateur Radio Club, P. O. Box 8852, Alexandria, LA.
71306. 
Prez says . . . Final Words from our President, Jim Walters, AE5ZE
December 2019 Well, we are almost the end of another year. It's time for
our Christmas Dinner on Dec. 3rd, so if you have not made your
reservations, please contact Steve Baillio, our treasurer before Friday,
November 29th. After making reservations, you can pay at the door. The
cost is $12.00 per person. Hope to see you there. We are having the same
caterer as last year and everything was great! During our Christmas
Dinner we will install our new Board of Directors. Amateur radio is an
evolving hobby that has something for everyone. As you make plans for
2020, please consider doing something new in amateur radio. I have
several projects to work on. The first is learning CW. I have a TS830S
that I am recapping (110 electrolytic capacitors), and have just
acquired a Hammarlund HQ110, and a Johnson Viking, both boat anchors
that I am going to restore and get on the air. What are you planning to
do??? This is my last Pres Says! I want to personally acknowledge the
Board Members that have served this past year. They did all of the work
to accomplish the tasks at hand and to make our club a success! Please
take the time to thank each one of them! See you on the bands! 73, Jim
AE5ZE

CLARC welcomes new member Chris Wright, KI5HDW! Chris passed his
Technician Class license exam at our November meeting! Time to study for
that upgraded license!

HEALTH AND WELFARE: Mike Canady, N5GJQ - Has been in the hospital for
nerve inflammation. Jack Brossette, W5ETL - Jack is having difficulty
with several heath issues. Jim Bookter, N5NVP and Mrs. Irma, KE5UPK -
continued prayers for Mrs. Irma's needs and safe travels for Jim as he
goes back and forth to Lafayette. Prayers for Joseph Notcha and his
needs. Mitchel Neil, KG5OIF - Prayers for Jeannie as she recovers from
gall bladder surgery. Steve Neesly, KE5IAK - Prayers for Mrs. Glenda as
she heals from a broken arm. Prayer this evening was led by Keith,
KF5RNF

Winter Field Day: Winter Field Day will be January 25 - 26. Jim asked
for a show of hands of those interested in participating in the field
day this year. Scott KD5DFL reminded the membership that we are still in
need of a location for the field day. Kees Park is one possible site,
but there are some antenna issues that we will have to work out. If the
field day were held at Kees Park, it would have to be limited to a
simple one-day event, Saturday only, running from setup at 8:00 AM to
take down around 8:00PM on the same day. Only two to three radios would
be set up. We would not be allowed use of the Kees Park area overnight.
An alternate site would be the LDWF Center in Woodworth, which we used
for the Summer Field Day.

Region 9:
From:
The SELARC "Hamster"
________________________________________
*Serving Amateur Radio Since 1974*
Published Monthly by the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club Inc.
P.O. Box 1324, Hammond LA 70404
Visit our website: www.selarc.org
Vol. 46, No. 11 ................................ November 2019

Happy Birthday
Birthday Wishes for November go out to - John Mark Robertson K5JMR,
Manny WD5BJR, and Tom W5PGS If we missed your birthday, then please let
us know.
Get Well Soon —
Best wishes for continued recuperation go to SELARC members Tom Simpson
N5HAY and Homer Jones KA5TRT. We look forward to hearing you on the
air!
VE Session Results
Congratulations to the following new Technician licensees!
Curt Montgomery - Hammond, La.
Kevin Jenkins - Covington, La.
Ronnie Voorhies - Madisonville, La.
Thank you once again, to all the VEs' who show up to make this
possible!!

Multiple Sclerosis 150-mile "Dat's How We Roll" Bike Tour
Over the October 5 & 6 weekend thirty-two amateur radio volunteers from
the Southeast LA Amateur Radio Club (SELARC), Southwest MS Amateur Radio
Club and southeast LA ARES provided 267 "people-power" hours of public
service in support of the annual Multiple Sclerosis bike ride from
Hammond (LA) to Percy Quin Park (MS) and back.
The hams used the SELARC VHF repeater and the LWARN UHF repeater system
to provide communications assistance to the safety, logistics and
medical teams spread over the route on the back-country roads of
Louisiana and Mississippi.
The Multiple Sclerosis staff and friends and families of the cyclists,
as well as the bikers themselves, were appreciative of the ham radio
volunteers and were impressed with the capabilities of amateur radio.
The event was a wonderful display of the ham operators' skills and
public service capabilities.
Special Events, Other Hamfests & VE Sessions
MARA Christmas Hamfest - Minden, LA - Dec 21, 2019
SELARC - 39th Annual Hammond Hamfest
Hammond VE Group - ARRL/W5YI tests are scheduled for the last Sunday of
each month [with the exception of holiday conflicts] in Room "B" of the
North Oaks Medical System Diagnostic Center at 2pm with $15 testing fee.
Bring photo ID and any appropriate CSCE. For more information contact
n5xes@arrl.net or Find an Amateur Radio License Exam in Your Area.

LOUISIANA SECTION NOVEMBER BOOK WINNERS:
ARRL Individual Member: Andy Allen, KF5ORM.
ARRL Affiliated Club: Central Louisiana Amateur Radio Club (CLARC)
Congratulations to both!

Next drawing is December 1st…..All Active Affiliated Clubs are
automatically entered; if you have already sent me your call you need
not send again…if you have not yet entered send me our call sign by
email, text, Facebook etc….you must be an active ARRL member in the
Louisiana Section to enter and win….73
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGERS REPORT:
Sessions QNI QTC QTR
15.            414 32.   224

73,
Jimmy Lewis/AB5YS
Louisiana Section Traffic Manager
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ARES:
ARES Monthly Section Emergency Coordinators Report
1. ARRL Section:  Louisiana
2. Month:  October
3. Year: 2019
4. Total number of ARES members: 435
5. Number of DECs/ECs reporting this month: 9
6. Number of ARES nets active:  60
7. Number of nets with NTS liaison:  3
8. Calls of DECs/EC reporting:  W4NDF, KD5MLD, KG5BNH, KE5BMS, AG5LR,
KD5DFL, W5GAS, KD5IGZ, KE5GMN
 9a. Number of exercises & training sessions this month: 32
  9b.  Person hours :  551
10a. Number of public service events this month : 1    10b. Person hours
: 276
11a. Number of emergency operations this month : 0
11b. Person hours :  0
12a. Number of SKYWARN operations this month:  1
 12b. Person hours :  40
13a. Auto Sum 9a, 10a, 11a, 12a :  34
 13b. Auto Sum 9b,
        10b, 11b, 12b:  867
Submitted by:  James Coleman, AI5B
Louisiana Section Emergency Coordinator

“CONGRATULATIONS” to ASEC Corey McCrary (W5MMC) and his wife Dr. Liz
McCrary on the birth of their first child, a boy GRAHAM ELDON McCRARY on
October 29th.**  

If you have not registered for ARES CONNECT please do so at the
following link: 
https://arrl.volunteerhub.com/lp/la
Please remember that your username must be your Call Sign!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
UPCOMING HAMFESTS:
12/21/2019 | MARA Christmas Hamfest
Location: Minden, LA
Sponsor: Minden Amateur Radio Assoc
Website: http://n5rd.org

01/18/2020 | 39th Annual Hammond Hamfest
Location: Hammond, LA
Sponsor: Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club, Inc.
Website: http://www.selarc.org
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
***ARRL COUPONS:
November 1-30 2019 $10 off When you spend $25 or more at
www.arrl.org/shop Use code:  THANKS
December 1-31 2019 $5 shipping when you spend $20 or more at
www.arrl.org/shop Use Code GIFT

***I had an excellent response to my recent email regarding Section
PIO’s…..3 people have expressed an interest in the position and
each
are very qualified and motivated ARRL members.  We still need PIO’s in
the following Regions:
3
5
6
9
Please contact our Section PIC Joe Holland at kb5vjy@gmail.ooc if you
are interested.

73 and see you next month,

--------------------------------------------------------------------
ARRL Louisiana Section
Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR
k5jmr@arrl.org
--------------------------------------------------------------------

Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter October 2019

LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER COTOBER 2019

SILENT KEYS:

RONALD K. PHELPS KC5FGO

 

NEW HAMS:

Michael V Macconn, KI5GLH
Berchman J Rodrigue, KI5GIL
Michael O Jackson, KI5GGP
Greg Tramell, KI5GGO
Lester J Zaunbrecher, KI5GIZ
Jeremy A Hoof, KI5GIY
Joshua J Bouy, KI5GJA
Scotty N Schadler, KI5GHG
Emily R Laprarie, KI5GJB
Jerry W Dukes, KI5GLY
Charles J Morgan, KI5GKC

 

LICENSE UPGRADES:

William A Long, KI5EVL

Shane R Slaughter, KI5FZP

 

NEW/RENEW ARRL MEMBERS:

William R McHugh, K5WRM
Michael O Jackson, KI5GGP
Nathan J Stelly, KD5IQW
Ilya Okhotnikov, UA4WGC
Hector L Martinez Sis, W5CBF
Hugh D Morris, N5HDM
Christopher J Rust, W5TNU
Kevin B Williams, KB5VFW
John A London, NS5W
Keith D Doughty, KG5EMX
Brian C Bendily, KI5GEN
Don Deville
Shane Slaughter, KI5FZP

 

FROM THE ARRL:

The Weather Channel Cites “Old School Tech” Amateur Radio as Storm Resource

09/30/2019

Julio Ripoll, WD4R, Amateur Radio Assistant Coordinator of WX4NHC at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) explained Amateur Radio’s role during severe weather situations to interviewers from The Weather Channel (TWC). In a September 16 segment headlined as “Using Old School Tech During a Storm,” Ripoll — seated at WX4NHC — told Weather Channel interviewers Rick Knabb and Mike Bettes, that information NHC forecasters receive via Amateur Radio volunteers and spotters “sometimes fills in gaps they can’t get from satellites or reconnaissance.”

 

Knabb recounted an occasion when he was trying to pin down information about a storm system in Central America. “The only way I was able to accurately document what happened with that system in Central America was because of data through the ham radio operators that relayed it,” he told Ripoll.

 

Ripoll cited the WX4NHC volunteer staff of approximately 30 radio amateurs who gather and essentially screen information gathered via Amateur Radio for weather data that may be of use to forecasters.

 

Pointing to the continued use of analog technology in a digital world, Bettes said Amateur Radio “may be a dinosaur, but you’re not extinct.”

 

For his own part, Ripoll over the weekend expressed appreciation to WX4NHC, Hurricane Watch Net, and VoIP Hurricane Net volunteers for the time they donate during hurricanes and the reports they send to WX4NHC.

 

“Sometimes, we sit for hours listening to static. Sometimes, we receive many reports that are unremarkable. Sometimes, we receive very few reports. But then there are those times that one or two reports make a difference,” Ripoll said. He noted that NHC Hurricane Specialist Stacy Stewart cited Amateur Radio in a Hurricane Humberto advisory.

 

The advisory noted, “An Amateur Radio operator at Ports Island near the southern end of Bermuda reported a sustained wind of 75 MPH and a gust to 104 MPH during the past hour. An Amateur Radio operator in Somerset Village recently reported a sustained wind of 70 MPH and a gust to 89 MPH.” — Thanks to Julio Ripoll, WD4R

 

Past North Texas Section Manager Phil Clements, K5PC, SK

09/30/2019

Former ARRL North Texas Section Manager Phil Clements, K5PC, of Ben Wheeler, Texas, died on September 23. An ARRL Life Member, he was 79. Clements served as ARRL North Texas Section Communications Manager/Section Manager from 1979 until 1989. (ARRL changed the position title to Section Manager in 1984.) Clements was a pilot for Braniff Airways and Airborne Express.

 

Jamboree on the Air (JOTA) Registration is “On Track”

10/04/2019

With just a couple of weeks to go before Scouting’s Jamboree on the Air (JOTA) event on October 18 – 20, JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND, reports that nearly 200 US stations have registered their intentions to participate.

 

“Over the last few years, we’ve typically had around 300 stations registered before the weekend,” Wilson told ARRL. “So, we’re on track.” Wilson noted that Icom America is providing an ID-51A Plus2 VHF/UHF D-STAR portable to encourage stations to submit after-event reports. A drawing will select the recipient.

 

“Band conditions aren’t expected to be any better than they’ve been for the past year, but the enthusiasm will be there,” Wilson predicted, “and local VHF-UHF can work as well as the D-STAR and [VoIP modes].” US participants who have not yet registered may do so online. — Thanks to Jim Wilson, K5ND

 

 

10/16/2019

ARRL’s twice-yearly School Club Roundup (SCR) gets under way on Monday, October 21, at 1300 UTC, and runs through Friday, October 25, at 2359 UTC. Stations may operate for up to 24 hours during the entire contest and for 6 hours during any single 24-hour period. Any mode — SSB, CW, or digital — is allowed for the event.

Stations will participate in five categories: Elementary/Primary, Middle/Intermediate/Junior High School, Senior High School, College/University Club, and Non-School Club. There is also a category for Individuals to participate.

The most popular time for younger students to be on the air is during after-school hours, but older students may be on the air at any time. Groups are limited to one transmitter on the air at any given time. Stations exchange signal report, category (School, Club, or Individual), and state, province, or DXCC entity. Stations can be worked once per band and mode. Participants will now be able to make up to three contacts with a station on each band using CW, voice, and digital modes.

The School Club Roundup is co-sponsored by ARRL and the Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club (LIMARC), and results appear in QST as well as online. The top three entries in each category — Elementary, Middle/Intermediate/Junior High School, Senior High School College/University — will receive an award certificate. Non-school clubs or multioperator groups and individuals are also eligible for certificates.

Submit scores and logs via the SCR score entry website. Scores and logs may be entered from the time the contest begins through the log submission deadline. Paper logs are acceptable as well. Logs for the October SCR are due by November 9.

 

ARRL to Launch New On the Air Magazine in January

10/17/2019

ARRL is launching a new magazine, On the Air, in January 2020. To be published on a bimonthly basis, On the Air will offer new and beginner-to-intermediate-level radio amateurs a fresh approach to exploring radio communication. Each issue will include advice and insights on topics from the variety of Amateur Radio interests and activities: radio technology, operating, equipment, project building, and emergency communication. The goal of this new magazine is to be a vital resource in helping new and newer radio amateurs get active and involved in radio communications.

On the Air responds to the brand new and not-so-brand-new radio amateur seeking ideas and answers,” said QST Managing Editor Becky Schoenfeld, W1BXY. Schoenfeld is part of the ARRL staff team that developed the new magazine. The planning included an extensive national-level study of new Amateur Radio licensees, identifying their motivations for getting licensed and their experiences of getting started. A focus group responded positively to a trial sample edition of the magazine.

“Too many new licensees never take the next step,” says Schoenfeld. “We’re excited to introduce a new Amateur Radio magazine for this audience, aimed at getting them active, getting them involved, and getting them on the air.”

The first issue of On the Air will be published in January 2020 (January/February issue) and will be introduced as a new ARRL membership benefit. Effective November 1, when eligible US radio amateurs join ARRL or renew their memberships, they will be prompted to select the print magazine of their choice — On the Air or QST. Current members receiving the print edition of QST, upon renewal, may choose to continue receiving the monthly print edition of QST or the print edition of the bimonthly On the Air.

All ARRL members, including international members, will be able to access digital editions of both QST and On the Air. Members who already access QST on the web or from the mobile app will be able to access QST and On the Air starting in January.

 

Louisiana, Mississippi Amateur Radio Volunteers Support “Bike MS: Dat’s How We Roll” Event

10/21/2019

Over the October 5 – 6 weekend, 32 Amateur Radio volunteers from the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club (SELARC), the Southwest Mississippi Amateur Radio Club, and Southeast Louisiana ARES supported the “Bike MS: Dat’s How We Roll” event. The tour provided 267 volunteer hours in support of the annual multiple sclerosis bike ride from Hammond, Louisiana, to Percy Quin Park, Mississippi, and back.

The hams used the SELARC VHF repeater and the LWARN UHF repeater system to provide communication for safety, logistics, and medical teams along the route on the back-country roads of Louisiana and Mississippi. Event sponsors, staffers, and friends and families of the cyclists as well as the cyclists themselves expressed their appreciation for the work of the ham radio volunteers and were impressed with the capabilities of Amateur Radio, Communications Coordinator Bob Priez, WB5FBS, said.

 

Pitcairn Island VP6R DXpedition on the Air; Injured Operator Evacuated

10/21/2019

Pitcairn Island DXpedition leader Glen Johnson, W0GJ, reports the VP6R team arrived at the South Pacific island on October 17, after the m/v Braveheart anchored offshore. After clearing customs and immigration, the team was transported to the home of Andy Christian, where the DXpedition’s equipment had been shipped well in advance.

“The steep dirt roads were very muddy from lots of recent rains, and had our equipment not been prepositioned, we would have been delayed by several days getting all stations on the air,” Johnson said.

The team is down to 12 operators after one individual fell and suffered several fractures. He was put aboard a supply ship and will be evacuated to Mangareva and on to Papeete. “Naturally we are all disappointed with this situation,” Johnson said. “DXpeditions to remote places are not without risk, and medical care is quite limited at best.” The injured operator was not identified.

Johnson reports that by the end of the first day, the team had erected antennas and put four stations on the air from Christian’s house. In the morning everyone moved to the old radio site to set up more antennas and stations at what will be VP6R’s primary low-band site. “The DX Engineering 160-meter falling derrick vertical is almost full-size and generated huge pileups that night, with 700 stations in the log!” Johnson enthused. Everything else was set up by Saturday, and the DXpedition team settled into its operating routine.

“Pitcairn has power from 8 AM until 10 PM,” Johnson explained. “After 10 PM, we switch to generators until morning. The Radio Site is 100% generator powered.”

By the end of the UTC day Sunday, VP6R had logged more than 16,000 contacts, including several 6-meter moonbounce contacts.

The weather has cooperated with pleasant temperatures, Johnson said. “When it rains, which is often, the dirt roads become ‘the world’s friendliest mud,’ as the residents call it, making travel between the two sites somewhat treacherous.” VP6R will be on 20 meters around the clock, often with more than one mode, with the goal of giving Pitcairn Island as a new one to everyone. VP6R will be on the air on all bands during the CQ World Wide DX phone event, October 25 – 26.

The VP6R team has reported that’s it’s experiencing some timing issues with FT8, which is being used in Fox & Hound mode. “With good conditions, at times we have been able to sustain nearly 400 Qs/hour, working five stations simultaneously.” Johnson said. VP6R said on its website that anyone in doubt of their contact should work the DXpedition again.

 

ARRL Creates New Online Groups for Members to Communicate with Leadership

10/22/2019

ARRL’s Committee on Communication with ARRL Members has opened new online forums where all radio amateurs — ARRL members and non-members alike — can discuss issues and topics in two-way conversation with ARRL leadership. The new groups are aimed at enhancing communication among ARRL leadership, staff, members, and prospective members, in a manner that enables timely updates and collegial discussion.

This project was based on the success over the past several years of the ARRL-LoTW (Logbook of The World) Group in responding to Amateur Radio operators’ questions and generating discussion on ways to improve that program. “The LoTW initiative has clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of online Groups as a means of achieving the desired interaction,” ARRL said in announcing the new groups.

ARRL has added three online groups:

  • ARRL-Contesting— moderated by ARRL Contest Advisory Committee Chairman Dennis Egan, W1UE.
  • ARRL-Awards— moderated by ARRL Radiosport and Field Services Manager Bart Jahnke, W9JJ.
  • ARRL-IARU— moderated by IARU Secretary Dave Sumner, K1ZZ.

The existing ARRL-LOTW group, which has about 4,750 members, remains hosted by Groups.io but has moved.

Everyone who subscribes to an ARRL Group is also automatically subscribed to the “ARRL Groups” group. This administrative feature will allow ARRL to convey routine announcements relevant to subscribers of all ARRL groups.

ARRL IT Manager Michael Keane, K1MK, worked with Groups.io to set up the new groups.

In the months ahead, the Committee envisions creating more online groups to support two-way communication focusing on areas of additional interest to radio amateurs, including ARRL activities, services, initiatives, and policies.

ARRL currently hosts members-only online forums that include Awards and Contesting. While these forums will continue to operate, participants will be encouraged to post new threads in the appropriate new groups.

Participants will be expected to adhere to some basic ground rules:

  • All questions are welcome, no matter how many times they have already been asked and answered, or how obvious the answers might be in the documentation.
  • Neither personal attacks nor foul language will be tolerated. Violators will immediately be placed on “moderated” status, meaning their subsequent posts will require Moderator approval until the Moderator’s trust has been regained.
  • Individuals posting are reminded that these forums are open to everyone, including prospective hams and operators who are not ARRL members but may be thinking about joining. Civility and courtesy are expected, even when you may take issue with a post or thread topic.

The Committee on Communication with Members believes that providing more opportunities for two-way discussion between ARRL leadership and the broader Amateur Radio community will assist the organization in truly serving the needs of this community.

 

FCC Turns Down Petition to Amend Amateur Radio Identification Rules

10/23/2019

The FCC has denied a Petition for Rule Making to amend Part 97 station identification rules to better accommodate and simplify station identification during emergency nets, drills, or activations. ARRL member Robert A. Dukish, KK8DX, of Canfield, Ohio, had sought a change to Section 97.119(a) of the rules to allow a single point of transmission for station ID on those occasions. He proposed permitting a net control station or other designated participant to announce the call signs of every station taking part in the net or exercise, when tactical call signs often are in use, at 10-minute intervals, using automatic CW identification.

In turning down Dukish’s petition, Scot Stone, the Deputy Chief of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau’s Mobility Division, said commenters overwhelmingly opposed the proposal.

“They argue that the current rule strikes the appropriate balance between the need to identify the source of transmissions and ease of communication,” Stone wrote. “Commenters state that, in their years of experience with amateur emergency communications, the station identification requirement has not proven to be a burden or obstacle, and that the current procedure actually contributes to efficient operations by providing a clear indication that a communication has ended and the channel is available.”

Stone said some commenters asserted that Dukish’s proposed procedure would be unworkable and cause confusion, while others characterized his proposal as a solution in search of a problem.

“The purpose of the station identification requirement is to make the source of transmissions clearly known to those receiving those transmissions,” Stone wrote. “Separating the call sign from each transmission would defeat this purpose.” Moreover, he said there’s no evidence that the current station ID requirements have hindered Amateur Radio emergency communications.

Dukish had filed his petition in December 2018, and the FCC invited comments on it in February 2019

 

 

FROM AROUND THE SECTION:

 

Scott, W5WZ, is the President of the Louisiana Contest Club and would like your opinions to help increase participation in the Louisiana QSO Party. He’s prepared a survey for both in-state and out-of-state amateurs that will help guide the event to greater success, and would appreciate responses from any and all.

https://www.w5wz.com/louisiana-qso-party-survey/

 

October Book Give Away Winners:

Affiliated Club: Ascension Amateur Radio Club.
ARRL Member: Glen Strecker KG5CEN.

 

SECTION TRAFFICV MANAGER’S REPORT FOR SEPTEMBER 2019

Sessions   QNI   QTC   QTR

  1.           411 21.      398

 

73,

Jimmy Lewis/AB5YS

Louisiana Section Traffic Manager

 

SECTION EMERGENCY COORDINATOR’S REPORT SEPTEMBER 2019

  1. ARRL Section: Louisiana
  2. Month: September
  3. Year: 2019
  4. Total number of ARES members: 425
  5. Number of DECs/ECs reporting this month: 9
  6. Number of ARES nets active: 58
  7. Number of nets with NTS liaison: 1
  8. Call of Dec/EC Reporting: W4NDF KD5MLD KD5BNH KE5BMS AG5LR WJ5Y W5GAS KD5IGZ KE5GMN

9a. Number of exercises & Training sessions:  37   9b. Person hours: 262

10a. Number of Public Service Events:  1   10b. Person hours:  3

11a. Number of Emergency Operations:   0    11b. Person hours:  0

12a. Number of SKYWARN Operations:  0    12b.  Person hours:  0

  1. Totals: 38 / 265.0

Check out the Ascension Airwaves Newsletter at :  http://k5arc.org/main/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Ascension-Airwaves-Sept-2019.pdf

 

Region 4:

Prayers continue for Herman Campbell KN5GRK who was hospitalized following a fall.

 

Region 6:

We have learned that our club treasurer, Steve Baillio, KA5HIK, while visiting family in Albuquerque, NM, has had a heart attack.  A heart cath has been done and two stints put in.  As soon as Steve can travel, his son will travel to Albuquerque to bring Steve and his wife back to Alexandria.

When we learn more, we will pass this information on to you.

We ask your prayers for Steve and his family.

 

Congratulations to CLARC’s own Stacy Sonneland, KG5KGU, for qualifying in August for the ARRL Certificate of Code Proficiency!  This certificate recognizes his merit and progress in Morse code proficiency in words per minute.

Please see page 99 in the October 2019 issue of QST Magazine.  Also see the attached document under August.

Great job, Stacy!

73 and thanks to everyone.

Lisa

KW5LC, Secretary

 

 

Region 7:

Effective September 15, 2019 ICS 300 was changed by FEMA and Emergency Management Institute (EMI) with a new updated two-day resident in class course.  The good news is our office once again was recertified to teach the course. We received not only state certification (LA Governor’s Office of Homeland Security), but also passed the national recertification test administered by FEMA-EMI.  From September 15, 2019 forward we may once again continue our efforts to improve Incident Command and Unified Command by holding our own ICS 300 & 400 courses.  One good news of this new version of ICS 300 & 400, is ICS 400 will now only be a one day course!   Please see the following schedule of courses we plan to offer (As always if your agency needs an additional course “on site” remember we can come to you):

These courses are available to any first responder or agency that works with Bossier Unified Command daily or during disasters (state agencies, VOAD partners and of course BAFB, Camp Minden & US Navy/USMC staff).

 

ICS 300

DATE: Nov 25-26 2019,

TIME: 8:00am

LOCATION: Bossier EOC

1511 Doctors Drive Bossier City, LA 7111

ICS 400

DATE: Dec 3, 2019

TIME:  8:00am

LOCATION: Bossier EOC

1511 Doctors Drive Bossier City, LA 7111

—————————————————————————————-

ICS 300

DATE: Dec 10-11, 2019,

TIME: 8:00am

LOCATION: Bossier EOC

1511 Doctors Drive Bossier City, LA 7111

ICS 400

DATE: Dec 12, 2019

TIME:  8:00am

LOCATION: Bossier EOC

1511 Doctors Drive Bossier City, LA 7111

——————————————————————————————

ICS 300

DATE: Dec 17-18, 2019,

TIME: 8:00am

LOCATION: Bossier EOC

1511 Doctors Drive Bossier City, LA 7111

ICS 400

DATE: Dec 19, 2019

TIME:  8:00am

LOCATION: Bossier EOC

1511 Doctors Drive Bossier City, LA 7111

ICS 300 & 400 Requirements (BOHSEP Uses Walk In Registration Process – No Pre-registration Required )             

   ICS 300                                                                                 ICS 400

Bossier EOC 1511 Doctors Drive

Bossier City, LA 71111

COL Gene Barattini (Ret) LEM, MEM, CHPP

Bossier Office of Homeland Security

&  Emergency Preparedness

Deputy Director

1511 Doctors Drive

Bossier City, LA 71111

EOC:   318-425-5352

gbarattini@bohsep.org

 

Region 9:

The SELARC “Hamster”

*Serving Amateur Radio Since 1974*

Published Monthly by the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club Inc.
P.O. Box 1324, Hammond LA 70404
Visit our website: www.selarc.org

Vol. 46, No. 10 ………………………….. October 2019

Hammond VE Group – ARRL/W5YI tests are scheduled for the last Sunday of each month [with the exception of holiday conflicts] in Room “B” of the North Oaks Medical System Diagnostic Center at 2pm with $15 testing fee. Bring photo ID and any appropriate CSCE. For more information contact n5xes@arrl.net or Find an Amateur Radio License Exam in Your Area.

AMSAT 50th Anniversary Awards Program for contacts 3/3/19 to 12/31/19

Happy Birthday

Birthday Wishes for October go out to – Bill KB5SKW, Ed KE5GMN, Allen W5EGG, and Ralph K5CAV. If we missed your birthday, then please let us know.

Get Well Soon —

Best wishes for continued recuperation go to SELARC members Tom Simpson N5HAY and Homer Jones KA5TRT. We look forward to hearing you on the air!

VE Session Results

Congratulations to the following ham on his upgrade to Extra!
Michael O. Jackson / KI5GGP – Covington, La.

Thank you once again, to all the VEs’ who show up to make this possible!!

 

**I attended the Chattanooga, TN Hamfest this past weekend for the Delta Division/TN D-Star Convention.  The hamfest was very well attended and I was made to feel right at home by all the folks up there.  The weather was good and nice and cool.  The event was held on a Friday afternoon and all day Saturday with many interesting and well attended forums.  The forums I attended was as follows:

 

APRS given by Dr. Gary Eiff W3GME

ARRL: On-the-Air in the 21st Century by Dan Henderson N1ND ARRL Regulatory Manager

D-Star:  given by Ed Woodrick WA4YIH

ARRL:  Moving the ARRL into the future by CEO Howard Michel WB2ITX

ARRL:  Delta Division Update by David Norris K5UZ

 

There was a D-star dinner held at a local restaurant for those interested in D-star to gather and exchange information; it was very well attended.

 

Longtime TN Section Manager Keith Miller N9DGK was honored as he plans to retire at the end of this year.  I especially wanted to attend the hamfest to tell Keith how much his friendship and guidance has meant to me over the past 2 years.  Keith has had some personal and family health issues and needs to step away form the SM job and devote more time to these things….Keith was presented with a plaque by the TN Section.  There is currently an election in the TN section for that position.

 

Some of the topics presented by David Norris were from the most recent ARRL Board meeting in July:

  • Made steps to support change in symbol rate
  • New Amateur Auxiliary Program advances
  • Looking at Life Membership & Dues rates
  • Banned robot contacts in contests
  • Banned robot contacts for DXCC credit
  • Added QRP category to RTTY Roundup
  • Voted to add Saudi Arabi & Seychelles to IARU
  • Moved to strengthen vendor/mfg. relationships
  • Created the Research UPDATED ARES PROGRAM Working Group
  • Advanced the EmComm Director title

_____________________________________________________________________

**Congratulations to our 2019 ARRL Louisiana Section Amateur of the Year Jaclyn L. “Jackie” Price KA5LMZ! Jackie, who is the R4 St. Mary Parish EC was nominated by Herman Campbell KN5GRK who sent a long list of reasons why he was nominating her. We will meet with Jackie in November to present her plaque. **

 

**Please continue to keep ASM Mike McCrary WB5LJQ in your prayers as he continues to heal from back surgery!

 

Upcoming Hamfests:

11/02/2019 | Greater New Orleans Ham Fest

Location: Harahan, LA
Sponsor: Crescent City Amateur Radio Group
Website: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2044282109131267/

 

12/21/2019 | MARA Christmas Hamfest

Location: Minden, LA
Sponsor: Minden Amateur Radio Assoc
Website: http://n5rd.org

 

01/18/2020 | 39th Annual Hammond Hamfest

Location: Hammond, LA
Sponsor: Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club, Inc.
Website: http://www.selarc.org

 

**Our next drawing for the monthly book giveaway will be here soon!

 

Hoping everyone has a good start to November; be safe out there and have fun!

 

73,

LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER FEBRUARY 2019

LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER FEBRUARY 2019

Nominations are still being accepted for the 2019 Delta Division Amateur of the Year Award.  Please email me ASAP for the nomination form.  I must have them forwarded to our Delta Division Vice Director Ed Hudgens by March 1st.

Silent Keys:

Paul Ecke  KC5BYE

Joseph Manena W5DEA

James “Bob” Jenkins WD5GBL

Robert Raborn KA5HUF

Michael Raymond W5IAA

Albert Edgar Baker KF5IBW

 

New Hams:

Report for 2019-02-04

Elliot D Eaton, KI5CVN
David Fulton, KI5CWP
John T Frank, KI5CVQ
David A Cook, KI5CVO
David A Nixon, KI5CTV
Nicholas Z Overby, KI5CUG

 

License Upgrades:

Report for 2019-02-04

Gregory B Fortune, WD5GNX
Patrick M Taylor, KG5YFR
Mikle B Schwaller, KI5ADL
James P Tillman, KG5CWE

 

New/Renewed ARRL Members:

Report for 2019-02-04

Brian M White, WB5BMW
David P Arceneaux, KI5CTE
Ronald E Martin, WB5QDR
Floyd E Milford, KG5OMH
Earl L Galle, KI5CTK
James H Redmond, K5QNT
Zeralda LaGrange
David J DeCourt
Michael H Gonzales
Edward Gatza, WB5BGY
James A Harvey, KG5TBL
Jake Williamson, KI5CDO
Cecil R Smith, N5DR
Patrick L Widner, KG5AAH
Anthony J Summers, KB5YHI
Douglas W Poole, KJ5WT
John N Armistead, KE5YSE
William F Hensel, K5KYD

 

FROM THE ARRL:

 

IARU Region 1 Youth Contesting Program Wants to Enlist More “Big-Gun” Stations

02/08/2019

International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 (IARU-R1) Youth Working Group Chair Lisa Leenders, PA2LS, said young operators (age 26 or younger) in Region 1 (Europe and Africa) have been invited to participate in the Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) Youth Contesting Program (YCP).

“Youth members from IARU Region 1 member-societies are invited to take part in a contest from so called ‘Top Gun’ stations,” she said. “These young hams will learn how to operate the contest station, improve their contest skills, and aim for the best results together as a team.” Leenders said long-time YCP partners 9A1A, ES9C, and 4O3A are already on the schedule of host stations, and additional stations are welcome. LX7I will join the roster during the ARRL International DX Contest (SSB), and LZ9W, OZ5E, and DP9A will be available for other contests later this year.

More information and an application form is available on the YOTA website.

Inspired by the YOTA YCP, the unrelated Young Amateurs Radio Club (YARC) Youth Contesting Program (YCP) wants to match groups of enthusiastic young contesters with top contest stations to gain operating experience during the CQ World Wide WPX SSB Contest over the March 30 – 31 weekend.

 

ISS Packet Radio System is Back in Operation with New Equipment

02/08/2019

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) packet system is back on the air with new equipment. The replacement gear arrived last November and had been awaiting unpacking and installation. ARISS hardware team members on the ground were able to locate a functional duplicate of the old ISS packet TNC module that had been in operation for 17 years and had become intermittent. Crew members installed the new module on February 2; the RF gear remains the same.

The ISS packet system, located in the ISS Columbus module, went down in July 2017, but it unexpectedly came back to life the following summer. The packet system operates on 145.825 MHz. ARISS is an official back-up system for astronauts to talk with Mission Control in the unlikely failure of the station’s primary communication systems.

In 2017, hams relayed nearly 89,000 packet messages via the ISS; response to its recent return has been enthusiastic, ARISS said.

Contribute to the all-new radio system set to launch this year via the ARISS website. For more information, contact ARISS-International Chair Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, or ARISS ARRL Delegate Rosalie White, K1STO. — Thanks to ARISS

 

New IOTA “Ice DXpedition” to Inakari Island

02/07/2019

A new Islands on the Air (IOTA) island — Inakari Island (EU192) — now is being activated for the first time until Monday, February 11, 0600 UTC, by a small international team. Kataja/Inakari Island was added to the official IOTA list last fall. Martti, Laine, OH2BH; Nigel Cawthorne, G3TXF; Niko Halminen, OH2GEK, and Gerben Menting, PG5M, will be travelling by snowmobile several kilometers over the frozen surface of Bothnian Bay to set up camp on the Finnish part of Inakari Island, where they will use an abandoned fisherman’s refuge.

Inakari Island is part of the Bothnian Bay National Park. The team will run two stations simultaneously on 80, 40, 30, 20, 17, and 15 meters, CW and SSB, using the call sign OH10X (OH-ten-X). QSL via PG5M using Club Log. Daily posts on the PG5M website will offer updates. — Thanks to Martti Laine, OH2BH

 

ARRL Board Gives the Go-Ahead to Lifelong Learning Initiative

02/07/2019

ARRL is undertaking a new initiative to provide online educational opportunities to a broad range of radio amateurs. The Lifelong Learning Initiative will seek to provide a series of learning tracks that will serve the needs of the various interest groups within the Amateur Radio community.

While designed for everyone with an interest in learning more about Amateur Radio, the Lifelong Learning Initiative will initially focus on creating online learning opportunities for new and newer hams, a segment of the Amateur Radio community desperately searching for educational and instructional and resources.

The ARRL Board of Directors set the Lifelong Learning Initiative in motion, endorsing and funding the program and approving the hiring of advertising agency Mintz + Hoke to work with ARRL Lifelong Learning Manager Kris Bickell, K1BIC, and other ARRL staffers in building this learning environment. Mintz + Hoke will conduct the research necessary to identify the different educational needs within the broader Amateur Radio community.

“Mintz + Hoke is a really strong partner in this project,” Bickell said, adding that the firm has developed a really deep understanding of the Amateur Radio community as part of the investigation phase of this endeavor.

Bickell noted that youth education will be a critical component of this Learning Initiative, but he also believes that overall opportunities in this area are huge, as many individuals are looking to expand their knowledge of Amateur Radio.

He said that, where appropriate, the content of these learning tracks within the initiative will build upon much of the knowledge base that already exists within ARRL, such as the material in QST and QEX magazines, as well as other ARRL publications and manuals. Some new content will be created as well, to ensure that the information being provided stays fresh and dynamic.

In addition to providing instruction, the Learning Initiative will offer resources that allow individuals to delve further into a subject, rather than just relying on ARRL content.

“We are building a new learning environment,” Bickell said. “It will take a lot of work to put this all together, but we believe that this initiative will firmly establish ARRL as an educational leader in Amateur Radio.” He expects the online Lifelong Learning platform to launch in the fall of 2019.

In conjunction with its support of the Lifelong Learning Initiative, the ARRL Board also endorsed CEO Howard Michel’s HQ reorganization plans, and the purchase of a modern association management software system.

“These are big investments the Board is making in ARRL, and a strong positive vote of confidence that we can deliver,” Michel said. “They are giving us the tools to be successful.”

 

Reshaping ARRL Objectives, Refocusing ARRL HQ Structure is New CEO’s Goal

02/07/2019

A plan by ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX, to reshape and reorganize the management structure at ARRL Headquarters will go into effect on Monday, February 11. The ARRL Board of Directors endorsed the plan during its Annual Meeting on January 18 – 19 in Windsor, Connecticut.

“I see ARRL as a membership association, a business, and a 501(c)(3) public charity. As CEO, I intend to strengthen all three aspects. And all three must remain in balance for ARRL to function effectively,” Michel said.

“As a business, ARRL is not just QST magazine, The Handbook, DXCC or the VEC program. We can’t allow ourselves to continue to think within those traditional parameters.” He continued, “ARRL’s businesses are not membership, publishing, and advertising. ARRL’s businesses are value creation, value delivery, and advocacy. I plan to architect ARRL along those lines. To quote Steve Jobs, ‘More important than building a product, we are in the process of architecting a company that will hopefully be much more incredible, the total will be much more incredible than the sum of its parts.’” Michel said.

The reorganization has three key components. The first major change is the creation of a management council (MC). The MC will be a deliberative and generative body to discuss ideas, operations, and long-term planning for ARRL. The group’s goal is to foster horizontal lines of communication within the organization. Direct horizontal lines of communications are much more efficient than “up, over, and down,” Michel offered.

The second key change, Michel said, is the addition of a Product Development Manager. This individual’s responsibility will be to create new ideas for products and services, create pilot programs to quickly test those ideas, and then — if the pilot programs are successful — transition them to operations. “The motto in startups is to fail fast,” Michel said. “Let’s innovate like a startup.”

Third, he said, is creating the position of a Marketing Communications Manager. “Our brand works with our traditional members. It is not working for newly licensed hams,” Michel said. “If we are to create a demand for the value we bring to Amateur Radio, we need a coordinated and consistent message, across all forms of media that resonates with current and potential members.”

In conjunction with its support of this reorganization plan, the ARRL Board of Directors also endorsed a proposal to create a new Lifelong Learning platform that will establish ARRL as an educational leader in Amateur Radio, and the purchase of a modern association management software system that should dramatically improve ARRL members’ experiences.

“These are big investments the Board is making in ARRL, and a strong positive vote of confidence that we can deliver,” Michel said. “They are giving us the tools to be successful.”

Facebook

 

New Campaign Exploiting Linux Servers to Insert Backdoor “SpeakUp” Trojan

02/07/2019

A new backdoor Linux-based operating system trojan dubbed “SpeakUp” is on the loose, although so far it does not appear to have propagated to North America or Europe. Research team Check Point Research recently reported the discovery and said SpeakUp exploits known vulnerabilities in six separate Linux distributions and is able to evade all security vendors. A community of radio amateurs use various forms of Linux, including the popular Ubuntu software, which includes ham radio apps. Check Point Research said the attack is targeting worldwide servers.

“The attack is gaining momentum and targeting servers in East Asia and Latin America, including AWS [Amazon Web Services]-hosted machines,” the Check Point Research article said. “SpeakUp acts to propagate internally within the infected subnet, and beyond to new IP ranges, exploiting remote code execution vulnerabilities. In addition, SpeakUp presented ability to infect Mac devices with the undetected backdoor.” The origin of the malware appears to be in East Asia, although its developer may be Russian.

Check Point Research said the sample it analyzed had targeted a machine in China on January 14. Once the software successfully registers a victim, it receives commands to manipulate the machine to download and execute various files. Check Point Research said SpeakUp serves XMRig cryptocurrency miners listening to infected servers.

“SpeakUp’s obfuscated payloads and propagation technique is beyond any doubt the work of a bigger threat in the making,” Check Point Research concluded. “It is hard to imagine anyone would build such a compound array of payloads just to deploy few miners. The threat actor behind this campaign can at any given time deploy additional payloads, potentially more intrusive and offensive. It has the ability to scan the surrounding network of an infected server and distribute the malware.”

Linux is a family of free, open-source operating systems based on the Linux kernel first released in 1991 by Linus Torvalds.

 

World Scout Jamboree is Possible ARISS Amateur Radio Contact Host

02/06/2019

The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station US team (ARISS-US) has announced the list of schools or organizations that may host Amateur Radio contacts with International Space Station (ISS) crew members from July through December. The list includes the 24th World Scout Jamboree, which is set for this summer at the Summit Bechtel Scout Reserve in West Virginia. Schools and organizations had submitted proposals seeking an opportunity to host contacts, and a review team of teachers from the ARISS-US Education Committee selected from those submissions. Applicants chosen will advance to the second phase of the selection process — developing an Amateur Radio equipment plan to host a scheduled ARISS contact.

ARISS’s primary goal is to engage young people in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) activities, and involve them in pursuits related to space exploration, Amateur Radio, communication, and associated areas of study and career options.

“ARISS is such an incredible opportunity for students to gain a once-in-a-lifetime experience and real-world skills that they can use the rest of their lives,” teacher Joanne Michael, KM6BWB, said following a 2017 contact at Meadows Elementary School in Manhattan Beach, California, where she and her students launch balloons carrying ham radio payloads. Meadows is also an ARISS-US Education Committee member.

ARISS anticipates that NASA will be able to provide scheduling opportunities for these US host organizations. Once the ARISS technical team approves the equipment plans, the finalists will be scheduled as their availability and flexibility line up with contact opportunities.

 

ARRL Emergency Preparedness Manager to Step Down

02/06/2019

 

ARRL Emergency Preparedness Manager Mike Corey, KI1U, has announced that he will depart ARRL on February 15 to pursue another career opportunity. He has been part of the ARRL staff since 2010.

“Mike has accomplished much during his nine years on the job, including expanding the Ham Aid program, national disaster response, working with our national partners, and, most recently, the rollout of ARES Connect,” said ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX. “The Headquarters team will miss Mike’s friendly personality and wishes him well in his pursuits. As Mike is an active ham, there is a good chance we will run into him on the air.”

As part of the overall restructuring at ARRL Headquarters, ARRL management will take the opportunity to examine the administration of the emergency preparedness program.

 

Earth’s Magnetic North Pole Shifts toward Siberia

02/05/2019

National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) scientists have updated the world magnetic model (WMM) mid-cycle, as Earth’s northern magnetic pole has begun shifting quickly away from the Canadian Arctic and toward Siberia, an NCEI report said this week. The new WMM more accurately represents the change of the magnetic field since 2015. The alteration could have an impact on government, industry, and consumer electronics.

“Due to unplanned variations in the Arctic region, scientists have released a new model to more accurately represent the change of the magnetic field,” the report said, noting that updated versions of the WMM are typically released every 5 years. This update comes about 1 year early.

“This out-of-cycle update before next year’s official release of WMM 2020 will ensure safe navigation for military applications, commercial airlines, search and rescue operations, and others operating around the North Pole,” said NCEI, which is part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). “Organizations such as NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration, US Forest Service, and many more use this technology. The military uses the WMM for undersea and aircraft navigation, parachute deployment, and more.”

Other governmental entities use the technology for surveying and mapping, satellite/antenna tracking, and air traffic management. Smartphone and consumer electronics companies also rely on the WMM to provide consumers with accurate compass apps, maps, and GPS services.

Airport runways may be the most visible example of a navigation aid updated to match shifts in Earth’s magnetic field. Airports around the country use the data to give runways numerical names, which pilots refer to on the ground. The declination has changed slightly more than 2.5° over the past 2 decades or so. Compasses use declination — the difference between true north and where a compass points — to help correct navigation systems for a wide variety of uses.

As Earth’s magnetic field evolves between the 5-year release schedule of the WMM, these predicted values can become off as the rate of change in Earth’s magnetic field evolves due to unpredictable flows in Earth’s core. The NCEI report said Earth’s north polar region is experiencing one of these erratic changes.

DXer and Contester Frank Donovan, W3LPL, said the slowly drifting geomagneticnorth pole has much greater significance to DXers and contesters because the northern auroral oval — which greatly affects HF propagation over the north Atlantic and north Pacific Oceans — is closely centered on the geomagnetic north pole and not on the magnetic — or dip — north pole discussed in the NCEI report.

“The geomagnetic north pole has been drifting generally northward at only about 3 miles per year,” Donovan pointed out. “The location of the magnetic north pole is important to navigation but of relatively little importance to space-based phenomena such as HF ionospheric propagation.” — Thanks to NOAA-NCEI

 

Brunei V84SAA DXpedition to Focus on Low Bands

02/05/2019

Setup is under way in the tiny Southeast Asian nation of Brunei, located on the Island of Borneo and surrounded by Malaysia, for the V84SAA DXpedition. Eighteen operators under the leadership of Krassy Petkov, K1LZ, will fire up on February 7 and continue until February 18. Operation will concentrate on the low bands.

“Many of the team have already landed in Brunei, and the tent is set up on the beach for the CW team,” top band expert Jeff Briggs, K1ZM/VY2ZM, reported just prior to his planned departure from the US. Briggs explained in a February 4 update that two operating sites — one for CW and the other for SSB — will be set up some 25 kilometers apart. “The CW stations will be set up on Seri Kenangan beach, with an ocean shot to North America and Europe,” he said, adding that he anticipates the first real night will be February 8, as the team may not be fully set up on 160 meters on the first day, and “there is a lot on our plate.” After that, Briggs said he plans to be at the radio nightly, and he’s hoping manmade noise remains minimal to nonexistent.

All of North America will have some portion of common darkness with the V84SAA team. Briggs advises North American stations to look for V84SAA immediately after local sunset in Brunei, not necessarily at local sunrise in North America. “We may peak out of a 220° heading about 20 minutes after it gets dark in Brunei,” he said.

For antennas, the team will use verticals on 160 and 80 meters and a four-square on 40 meters located on the beach. Plans call for two Beverages — one for Europe and another for North America. While the team will focus on the low bands, expect to find V84SAA on the higher bands — including 30, 17, and 12 meters.

In addition to Petkov and Briggs, other US operators on the team include Briggs’s son Patrick, KK6ZM, and Adrian Ciuperca, KO8SCA. The V84SAA team will have the support of Tamat Lampoh, V85T, and the Brunei Darussalam Amateur Radio Association. QSL via Tony Stefanov, LZ1JZ, direct or via the bureau. During the DXpedition, V84SAA will upload its logs daily to Club Log.

Brunei is the overall 146th most-wanted DXCC entity, according to the Club Log DXCC Most Wanted List, but it’s number 39 on 160 meters, and 73 on 80 meters.

 

AMSAT Announces 50th Anniversary Space Symposium

02/05/2019

The 2019 AMSAT 50th Anniversary Symposium will take place on October 18 – 20 at the Hilton Arlington in Arlington, Virginia, next to Washington, DC. Connected to the Ballston Metro Station, the hotel offers easy access to the capital’s top tourist destinations, and tours will be available; it’s 6 miles from Reagan National Airport. The AMSAT Board of Directors will meet on October 16 – 17. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service

 

Es’hail-2/P4A Satellite is Designated as Qatar-OSCAR 100 (QO-100)

02/04/2019

AMSAT has now granted OSCAR status to 100 Amateur Radio satellites. The latest, Es’hail-2/P4A — now Qatar-OSCAR 100 (QO-100) —launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in November. It carries the first geosynchronous Amateur Radio payload. Es’hail-2/P4A was developed jointly by the Qatar Amateur Radio Society (QARS) and Es’hailSat (the Qatar Satellite Company), with AMSAT-DL as the technical lead. Now at its final position of 25.9° E and with the narrow and wideband transponders having been successfully tested in December, the transponders are expected to be opened for general use this month. “May the 100th OSCAR satellite be the guide star to future Amateur Radio satellites and payloads to geostationary orbit and beyond,” invoked Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, AMSAT Director of VP Operations and OSCAR Number Administrator. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service

 

Geoffrey Starks Sworn in as FCC Commissioner

01/31/2019

The FCC now officially has its full complement of five members. Democrat Geoffrey Starks, who succeeds Mignon Clyburn on the Commission, was sworn in January 30. He formerly served as assistant bureau chief in the FCC Enforcement Bureau and in the US Department of Justice.

“I am deeply honored to serve as a Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission, and I thank the President and the United States Senate for this exceptional privilege.” Starks said in a statement. “As the last few weeks have affirmed, being a public servant is a calling to serve a mission bigger than yourself. Throughout my career, I have focused on protecting the most vulnerable and holding wrongdoers accountable. In my new role, I shall not only continue to pursue those goals, but also look forward to working with Congress, my fellow Commissioners, and the FCC’s outstanding staff.” Starks, who holds a law degree from Yale, said that every community “has a stake in the future of communications in this country, and all have the right to be heard. I will always be listening.”

Republican Brendan Carr, who already was sitting on the Commission after appointment to an unexpired term, recently was reconfirmed for a new full 5-year term. Three of the FCC’s five members are traditionally of the same political party as the President.

 

 

FROM AROUND THE SECTION:

 

REGION 1:

From the Ascension Airwaves

February 2019

The February monthly meeting is scheduled for

Wednesday 6 February 2019 at 19:00 hrs. at

the Ascension Office of Homeland Security and

Emergency Preparedness at 828 South Irma

Blvd in Gonzales.

 

Talk in is on 147.225+ MHz (107 pl).  You can

follow us at www.K5ARC.org or

www.FaceBook.com/k5arc

 

The  President’s Corner

Another month has flown by.  We have started off 2019

strong and hopefully will keep the momentum

going.  We are a small club but we are active again, we

are networking with other groups and we are hoping to

grow and do more.  Please come out to our meetings

and get on the nets and repeaters. If you haven’t paid

your dues please take a minute to get caught up. If you

know someone who is interested in ham radio please

pass along a copy of our newsletter or point them to

our website and social media. We need to spread the

word that AARC is back and better than ever. We have

lots to do in the coming weeks and months and we

want as many people as possible involved. I hope to see

everyone at the meeting Wednesday night.

73,

Steve, KC5SAS

 

Winter Field Day 2019

Weather Saturday was

awesome for a January day and we had a good turnout. We

pulled the trailer out from under the canopy at the Fire

Station on Roddy Road, fired up the generator, air

compressor, and pneumatic mast. Steve even pulled out our

inflatable tower and aired up that beast. We were able to

show members the trailer in action and made contacts over

FT8, PSK-31, 2 meters, and SSB. We even had good

propagation that day due to a Solar Flux Index of 76 and

sunspot number of 23. 20 meters was a little tough but

there was plenty of action on 40m were we made most of

our contacts including with the neighbors in Livingston

Parish.

The LOHSEP club also participated in WFD. They

operated the entire 24 hours and had almost 200

contacts from their mobile command post. On Sunday

Steve, KC5SAS, and Elmer, N5EKF, drove over and met

with them. They had a very good outing as well.

 

A Year or So in Review

I joined AARC almost a year ago in April and was

voluntold to be Secretary and Treasurer. Steve and

David had been working together to get the club going

again. Behind the scene we have had many e-mails,

text, phone calls, and work days to get us where we are

today. Some of the things we have accomplished-

1)  Ascension Airwaves- I thought it would be a good idea

to help spread the word if we did a monthly newsletter.

Not only does it go out to AARC but Baton Rouge,

MissLou, SELARC, LOHSEP, Livingston, Bayouland

(Houma/Thibodaux), BEARS (Morgan City), Acadiana

clubs all receive this newsletter.

2)  We have new bank accounts. Steve, David, and I spent

almost half a day opening new accounts for the club.

3)  We have an IRS EIN number. We had to have this to

open new bank accounts, file with the Secretary of

State, and apply for our 501c3 status.

4)  Our club is registered and in good standing with the

Louisiana Secretary of State’s office.

5)  We renewed the K5ARC club call with the FCC and are

good for the next 10 years.

6)  We have a new Trustee for the license after we were

not able to contact the previous one.

7)  We are an ARRL affiliated club.

8)  We are good on QRZ!

9)  We have an up to date webpage and FaceBook account.

10) We have updated our Constitution and Bylaws.

Treasurer’s reports and meeting minutes are all current.

11) We have our station at the EOC back in working order

and have reestablished ties with the Ascension OHSEP.

12) We have our communications trailer back in working

order after being stored in the open for over 2 years.

We have also gotten it out of the weather and are

looking at having shore power to maintain the batteries

in it.

13) We have the 225 machine back on the air after being

down for over 1 ½ years.

14)  We have applied for a grant to completely

replace repeater, duplexers, hardline, and antenna for

the 225.

15)   Our 310 and 985 machines are on the air. We

have just added EchoLink to the 310 machine.

16)   We have filed our application and it was

accepted by the IRS to be a 501c3 organization.

17)  This month we start our new meeting format-

short business meeting and then we will have a program

on a topic of interest. We have our next 3 months

already planned!

18)  We just operated Winter Field Day from our

trailer. Some issues and upgrades will be coming up.

 

This is just a few things that have come to mind. Let’s

see what we can add to the list in the near future!

 

ACTIVE LOCAL REPEATERS

Ascension

147.225+ (107.2 pl) Gonzales

146.985- (107.2 pl)  Convent/Sunshine Bridge

145.310- (107.2 pl)  Port Vincent *EchoLink*

28.211 (CW) K5ARC 10m beacon

Livingston

147.165+ (107.2) LOHSEP

145.23- (107.2) Fusion, Wires-X, DWARN

442.350+ (107.2) LOHSEP

EBR

145.49- Fusion/Wires-X, DWARN

146.88 D-Star (no reflector)

146.79- (107.2) FM/C4FM

443.100+ (107.2 pl)

443.375+ Fusion/ Wires-X/DWARN

Felicianas

53.83 (-1 MHz 107.2 pl) FM

146.835- (114.8 pl) FM, Echolink

443.850 (+5 MHz 107.2 pl) FM

Lafourche/Terrebonne

147.30+ (114.8 pl) Fusion/FM    Gray, LA

147.39+ (114.8 pl)

 

Local Nets

Sundays

Post Office Net 3.905 MHz LSB 07:00 local

ARES State Wide 3.878 MHz LSB 19:00 local

ARES Region 2 Net  146.79-   20:00 local

BRARC Club Net       146.79-   20:30 local

Mondays

10M Net 28.450 MHz USB 19:30 local

Bayou Region Net  147.39+ 19:00 local

Tuesdays

LOHSEP ARC 147.165+ 19:30 local

Wednesdays

MissLou 146.835- 20:00 local  (EchoLink KD5UZA-R)

SELSA Net 146.52  21:00 local

Thursdays

Livingston ARC  146.73- 19:00 hrs

BEARS Morgan City 146.91- 19:30 local (Echolink W5BMC-R)

K5ARC Informal Net 147.225+ 20:00 hrs. local

(Echolink K5ARC-R)

 

LWARN Linked Repeaters

Livingston-      444.350 +    pl 136.5

West Feliciana-                 443.625 +   pl 156.7

Greensburg-      442.275 +   pl 156.7

Washington Parish-   442.425 +   pl 156.7

EBR (Central)-        442.400 +   pl 156.7

St Tammany Parish    443.425 +   pl 156.7

These repeaters are part of the Governor’s Office of

Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

(GOSHEP). Amateur operators are welcome to use them

 

DWARN Linked Repeaters

Livingston  145.23-       pl 107.2       DG ID 23

Bush    145.47-       pl 114.8       DG ID 92

Baton Rouge  145.49-       pl 107.2       DG ID 22

Baton Rouge  443.375+                         DG ID 21

Bush    443.400+    pl 114.8       DG ID 91

Madisonville  444.875+    pl 114.8       DG ID 93

New Iberia  442.025+    pl 103.5       DG ID 01

Parks    443.200+    pl 103.5       DG ID 01

Use PL tones for analog FM, DG ID for C4FM

 

Two new Fusion repeaters connected to the DWARN

network has just been added in New Iberia and Parks

(between New Iberia and Breaux Bridge). Great

coverage to the I-10 & 49 areas In Acadiana. For more

info see www.dwarn.org.

 

K5ARC.org Web Page Updates

David LeBlanc, N5LEB, and Steve Raacke, KC5SAS,

have been working hard to update the webpage.

Check it out for the latest news. You can use the link

to pay your dues. And we have just added a “Contact

Us” link and our snail mail address.

 

All three of us post often to Facebook with cool stuff

and announcements. Follow us at

www.facebook.com/k5arc

 

985 Repeater Updates

Conrad Baker, KG5FQT, went to the repeater site in Convent

and met with the manager Marcus Winslow of Continental

Cement. For those who do not know, our repeaters are

located on top of one of their cement silos just north of the

Sunshine Bridge. All 3 repeaters had gone down some time

ago and we were only able to get 985 working. That repeater

has a DB-224 antenna that points south and has excellent

coverage as far south as Morgan City, Houma, Thibodaux,

and over to New Orleans.

The APRS and 70cm repeaters are

still off the air. The Club has

obtained a new APRS machine to

replace the old one. Hopefully that

will be functional by the time you

are reading this.

 

The 70cm repeater will be going

DMR in the near future. More

information will be coming on

that. We will also impose on Conrad to do a DMR

presentation at the March meeting. He works with the Gulf

Coast link and has other DMR repeaters.

 

Once the K5ARC 440 repeater is repaired we will be looking

for tower space for it.

 

There has been more activity on our

145.310 machine thanks to the

Echolink node we recently put up.

The power supply for the node radio

died but N5LEB was able to replace it and the Echolink node

is alive and well. Check it out and join us on Thursday nights

at 20:00 for our “informal net.” We have been having a good

turnout the last few weeks.

 

David LeBlanc, N5LEB, will have a presentation on Echolink

for our Club meeting Wednesday. So come out and learn

something new.

 

We are still working on getting the 225 repeater completely

replaced. We hope to update members at our meeting

Wednesday.

 

During WFD operations we assembled the Comet GP-9

antenna we have in our trailer only to find out we have some

parts missing. The parts were ordered from Comet and are

being shipped. Comet was nice enough not to charge us. Big

thanks go out to Comet antennas for helping out!

 

River Region Amateur Radio

Association

From Conrad Baker, KG5FQT

So for those that haven’t seen in the Plantation Club group

page, the Plantation club is no more. After years of

struggling, coming out of personal pockets (mostly Adam’s

pocket) and with the plans we have for 2019, it was decided

to begin afresh. While the Plantation Club has a long history

and it will never be forgotten for its services to St John the

Baptist Parish over the last 40+ years, it was just easier to

start a new organization. After membership hand offs,

floods, moving houses, and more, there was very little

paper trail with the Plantation Club. With the new

organization, we will be able to file for 501(c)(3) status,

which we could not do with Plantation. With this, we will be

able to accept donations from local industry and hopefully

reach a point to give back to the community. We

 

 

are not trying to plan for a large club with a large

membership, but a tight nit group of Ham operators to

keep up with local and regional repeaters and help provide

emergency communications to be used in emergencies.

2019 will be big for us and we have a lot of plans. We will

be seeing several brand new repeaters go up with brand

new feed lines and brand new antennas. While we

appreciate everyone who has helped piece and part our

current repeaters now, the fact that we have only 1 out of

our 3 main repeaters fully functional, was proof that

changes needed to be made. With the assistance of the St

John Parish EOC, St John Communications District, St John

Parish Sheriff’s Office, we will be able to get 3, possibly 4

new repeaters in the air hopefully by the summer on a

brand new 450 ft. tower in the center of LaPlace. (Stone’s

throw from Stephen Riley’s backyard). 6m, 2m, 70cm

analog, and 70 cm DMR will be on this tower, linked with

redundant power and redundant fiber. Along with our

local 70cm repeater that is working great at this point on a

separate tower.

We plan on working very tightly with our neighbors to the

West at the Ascension Club, neighbors to the south at the

Thibodaux/Bayou Region club, neighbors to the north in

Hammond and the many clubs to our East. We also felt

that this new club would fill in the gap nicely between St

Charles parish and St James Parish that doesn’t have any

types of clubs.

Please remember that this is the first step in getting our

club started, and we have many items to iron out. There

may be many questions to ask, and we may not have all

the answers. Soon as myself, Adam and Steve Riley can get

together for a meeting and start working some things out,

we will let people know. For now, I have attached the link

to our new group below. We will keep this as a closed

group but it’s open for Amateur Radio operators to join as

long as they can answer the few questions we have. We

have just experienced some issues with non-hams and

spam with the open public groups and wish to keep it

closed at this time. Thanks everyone for reading this long

thread, and welcome on our new journey.

De K5ARC- we wish our neighbors to the south

good luck in their efforts and look forward to

closely working with them

 

Parting  Shots

Many of us attended the Hammond Hamfest. This was the

first year I attended and had a great time. Southeastern

LA University is a very nice campus and was a great

venue. The club did nicely selling off some of our gear

from the seacan. What was really nice was meeting so

many of you I talk with on the air especially members

from neighboring clubs. Our hats go off to the SELARC

members who put the hamfest together.

 

I am looking forward to the Rayne Hamfest coming up

next month. That is always a good one. AND the only

hamfest in the world that has boiled crawfish!

 

Winter Field Day was a good outing as well and we will

start preparing for Field Day in June. There are some

repairs and upgrades we want to do with our trailer

between now and then. We will need some help with that

 

There is still plenty of work to be done to get the Club

where we want it to be. Top of the list is more members.

Invite a friend, make the drive to Gonzales for the

meeting, or at least join us on our net.

 

As Charles Osgood used to say, “I’ll see you on the radio”

or at the meeting this Wednesday.

 

73’s de N5EKF …-.-

 

REGION 2:

RF News

BATON ROUGE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB

2/2019 EDITION

Greetings everyone!!

I just wanted to thank everyone for coming out to the club meeting on

January 29th. The program presentation for the meeting was an excellent pre-

sentation via Skype with Tim Duy (K3LR). The K3LR contest station was really

something to see. Most of us amateur radio operators would only dream of even

having access to a station of that sort much less owning one. Thank you to Tim

for taking time out of his schedule to show us his contest station. Next month,

we will have a Skype presentation with Martin Jue (K5FLU). Martin is the owner

and president of MFJ Enterprises in Starkville, Mississippi. MFJ got its start in 1972

while Martin was in college. The first product that was oered by MFJ was an

audio filter for CW operation.  Next month’s presentation will be about “The Early

Days of MFJ. I am very much looking forward to that. Thank you to Robin Hudson

(KK5RH) for arranging the Skype presentations with Tim Duy of DX Engineering,

Martin Jue of MFJ as well as Bob Naumann (W5OV) of DX Engineering who did

a Skype Presentation for the club in October of 2018. We will have more great

programs throughout the year and I will write a description of them in future

editions of the RF News.

There will be a new Technician license course taught by Brett Hebert

(KG5IQU), Buddy Brown (N5BUD) and others. The class will run from Thursday

March 7th and will conclude with a license exam on Thursday April 25th. I would

also like to congratulate all of the new amateur radio operators who passed their

Technician license exam prior to the last club meeting on January 29th as well as

those who upgraded their present license at our quarterly VE session.

Keep a watch on the club website (www.brarc.org) as well and also give a

listen to our 2-meter public service net which is held on the 146.790 mhz 2 meter

repeater on Sunday Evenings at 8:30 pm for future club activities and announ-

cements.  I would  also like to thank Dan Lott (KF5TQN) for agreeing to become

our newest net control operator. Dan is filling the void le in August 2016 when

our previous second week NCS George Gelpi (W5GG)  was forced to discontinue

his NCS service due to the 2016 flood in which his home was badly damaged. His

ham radio gear did survive the flood. We hope to hear him on 10 meters again

soon.

That’s about it for this month. Please join us for breakfast on Wednesday

and Saturday mornings at The Warehouse restaurant as well as James Grill in

Denham Springs on Saturday mornings.  We also meet on Friday Mornings for

breakfast at Frank’s Restaurant on Airline Highway just north of what used to be

Cortana Mall. We eat a lot in this club. All of the breakfast meetings start around

6:30 AM.

Todd Huovinen, AB5TH

 

Upcoming Events

HAMFESTS

FEBRUARY 23, 2019 – ORANGE HAMFEST, ORANGE, TX

MARCH 1-2, 2019 – BirmingHAMfest, BIRMINGHAM, AL

MARCH 8-9, 2019 – ACADIANA HAMFEST, RAYNE, LA

APRIL 27, 2019 – NORTHEAST LA HAMFEST, WEST MONROE, LA

CLUB MEETINGS

FEBRUARY 26, 2019 – CLUB MEETING, BLUEBONNET LIBRARY

7 PM PROGRAM: MFJ ENTERPRISES, MARTIN JUE

MARCH  12, 2019 – BRARC BOARD MEETING, FAIRWOOD LIBRARY

6:30 PM

MARCH 26, 2019 – CLUB MEETING, BLUEBONNET LIBRARY

CONTESTS/OPERATING EVENTS

MARCH 2-3, 2019 – INTERNATIONAL DX PHONE CONTEST

MARCH 16, 2019 – LA QSO PARTY

APRIL 14, 2019 – ROOKIE ROUNDUP – SSB

NETS

BRARC PUBLIC SERVICE NET – SUNDAY 8:30 PM 146.790 (PL TONE 107.2)

ARES NET – SUNDAY 8 PM 146.790 (PL TONE 107.2)

10 METER NET – MONDAY 7:30 PM 28.450 MHZ USB

TECH CLASSES

THURSDAYS STARTING MARCH 7, 2019 – EBRP MAIN LIBRARY 2ND FLOOR

 

ARRL LA Section News

Section Manager John Mark Robertson, K5JMR

 

The new year has gotten o to a great start in the LA Section beginning with the

Hammond Hamfest. The weather ended up nice aer all and the event was well attended.

Our ARRL/ARES forums were also well attended and we exchanged some good information

to those in attendance. We were also able to give away some nice door prizes.

The highlight of this event was for us to honor longtime ARRL and ARES member

DEC Robert “Bob” Priez, WB5FBS who retired as of January 1st.  Bob was presented a

plaque from both the Section as well as a plaque from Region 9 ARES presented by Ed

Mason, KE5GMN who took over for Bob as the new DEC.  Collins Simoneaux, W5OPS

Region 9 GOHSEP also presented Bob with a very special GOHSEP cap.  Bob has been a

very valuable asset not only to Region 9 but the entire Section for man,many years and we

thank Bob for his service.

Also at the Hamfest we were able to announce the 2018 ARRL LA Section Amateur

of the Year as James “Jim” Ragsdale, W5LA of West Monroe.  Jim was unable to attend

the Hamfest so on Tuesday February 5th I was able to travel to West Monroe and attend

the NorthEast LA ARC monthly meeting and present Jim with his plaque.  Jim was very

deserving of this award. Also at the NELARC meeting I was able to present our January

Book Giveaway winner Chris Joseph, KG5SSH his ARRL publications and “goodies”….

Congrats to Chris.

Speaking of the Book Giveway….Our 1st Club winner was the Acadiana ARA. I will

be at the Rayne Hamfest in March and get those books to them…..I hope many of you

can attend the Hamfest in Rayne….I’m looking forward to the fellowship and of course

the crawfish. We will have an ARRL/ARES forum and hope many of you will be able to

attend. We will have door prizes to give away. Our SEC Jim Coleman, AI5B will be giving an

excellent presentation on ARES and the changes we expect to see in the near future.

Speaking of ARES; please remember that if you are a past, current or want-to-be member

of ARES please go to the following link and submit your profile to ARES CONNECT:  ARRL

https://arrl.volunteerhub.com/lp/la

Once your submission has been approved you will be placed in the proper group

and eventually contacted by your Region DEC or Parish EC.  Our newest appointment

of Corey McCrary, W5MMC is for ASEC over ARES CONNECT. Corey will be our Section

Administrator and liaison to ARRL HQ for all things ARES CONNECT.

I hope to see you at Rayne….

 

MEMBER SPOTLIGHT:

Meet Todd, AB5TH. Todd Huovinen was recently

awarded the Stan Preston Award by BRARC.  Stan Preston

was a longtime member of BRARC. When he became a

Silent Key, the club honored his good samaritan qualities

by naming an annual award in his honor.  This award is

presented to a licensed amateur who has demonstrated

continued good samaritan activites through Amateur Radio.

Todd started the hobby as a shortwave listener in

1977.  While in a Radio Shack store in Grand Prairie, Texas,

he saw a multi-band radio that picked up stations from

around the world.  Impressed that the radio was able to pick

up the Voice of America (VOA) and The Armed Forces Radio

and Television Service (AFRTS) inside the store with all of the

florescent lighting nearby, he decided to get it.

In the early 90’s, he attended Ham-Com in Arlington,

Texas with a friend who had been urging him to get his

license and he got his KB5TMD call on June 29, 1992.  He

used his Alinco DJ-580T until the limitations of a handie-

talkie frustrated him enough that he purchased an old Icom

27H 45 watt 2m mobile radio.  He now uses a Kenwood TS-

590S as his main HF station.  He upgraded to General Class

in May of 2000 and to Extra Class in June of 2005.

Todd has served as president of the Southwest Dallas County Amateur Radio club twice and was a

member of that club for 17 years until moving to Baton Rouge in 2009.  He has been a member of the Baton

Rouge Amateur Radio Club since then, as has served on the Board of Directors for many years, as well as Net

Control Manager for BRARC. He was a member of the Livingston Amateur Radio Society in Denham Springs and

served as net manager for 3 years and club president for one year.  He is also a member of the Ascension Radio

Club in Gonzales as well as the American Radio Relay League.

You can find Todd at most Amateur Radio events – those in person as well as on the air.  Club and Board

meetings, Nets, Breakfasts, Contests, Field Day, and many others.  Oentimes he will have his family there as

well – his wife Jessica, KD5SXF, and daughter.

Congratulations Todd, AB5TH, on your recognition as the 2018 recipient of the Stan Preston Award.

 

BRARC’s Board of Directors recently presented two awards for 2018. The Board awards

the Stan Preston Award and the BR Award annually.  The Stan Preston award is given to a

licensed Amateur that has shown continued “Good Samaritan” activities in Amateur Radio.

The BR Award is given a BRARC member that has made an outstanding contribution to the

advancement of Amateur Radio.

Congratulations to Todd, AB5TH for being recongized as the Stan Preston Award

recipient and to Brook, N5DGK for being recognized by BRARC as the BR Award receipient.

 

Future VE Sessions

Baton Rouge – Thursday, April 25, 2019 6 PM at EBRP Main Library

Tuesday, April 30, 2019, 6 PM at EBRP Bluebonnet Library

Lafayette – First Tuesday of each month, 6 PM at Lafayette Science Museum

Saturday, March 9, 2019, 9 AM at AARA Hamfest, Rayne Civic Center

Hammond – Last Sunday of each month, 2 PM at North Oaks Diagnostics & E. Brent Dufreche Conference Center

 

Happy Mardi Gras!

This edition of the RF News is packed with lots of information.  A big thanks to all of those who contributed

to the February issue – Jerry Clouatre, AG5AY, John Mark Roberston, K5JMR, Todd Huovinen, AB5TH, and Brett

Hebert, KG5IQU.  As the editor, I edit the content that I receive.  I look forward to getting articles from more

members.  I want this newsletter to contain information that you find interesting and look forward to getting.  So

even if you aren’t able to submit an article, feel free to submit topics that you would like to know more about or

see covered.    I welcome all feeback and suggestions.

Please make plans to attend the club meetings at the EBRP Bluebonnet Library in the upcoming months.

We will begin collecting information and taking photos for the BRARC Directory.  If you prefer to choose your own

photo, please email it to me at the address listed below.

Looking forward to seeing everyone at the upcoming meeting and at the Hamfest in Rayne.

Synomen Hebert, KG5IRS

Synomen is the newest Editor of the

RF News.  Please send all articles or

information you’d like to see in the next

issue to her at: RFNEWS@BRARC.ORG

 

 

REGION 4:

14th Annual Eagle Expo Special Event

Bayouland Emergency Amateur Radio Service (BEARS) will hold a special events station for the 14th Annual Eagle Expo in Morgan City on February 23-24
(QST has wrong dates).
Call:  W5BMC
Times:  10:00 to 16:00 local
Frequency:  14.265~280 and 7.260~280 +/- QRM.
Talk-in: 146.91- (no pl) or EchoLink node 507010 W5BMC-R.
Location:  They will operate from Shannon Elementary School gym located at LA Hwy 182 & Brashear Ave. (at the foot of the old bridge).
This will be the second year that the display of birds of prey along with many other booths showing local wildlife. BEARS will showcase a history of telephone
and radio communications geared toward youth.
QSL to:
Jackie Price, KA5LMZ
1412 Maple St.
Morgan City, LA  70380

ACADIANA AMATEUR RADIO ASSOC., INC

Volume 59, Number 02

 

Club Activites Chris recapped the list of 2018 club events that included Winter Field Day, AARA Hamfest, Tabasco Sauce Anniversary Special Event, Summer Field Day, Tour de Teche canoe race and the Veterans Day Special Event. Chris summarized the club’s Veterans Day Special Event which was held in November at the Southwest Louisiana Veterans Home in Jennings, LA. The facility staff was very appreciative of the club’s efforts to honor these veterans and looks forward to hosting additional events in 2019. Cold weather reduced the number of facility residents that could visit the outdoor station which was set up outside the rear of the facility. For subsequent events efforts will be made to set up the station inside the facility. Conducting events in the spring when the weather is more pleasant will also be considered. Steve Webre recognized Chris for the work he put in to initiate and coordinate the event.

Since the Tabasco Sauce Special Event was held in conjunction with their 150th anniversary no repeat of this event is currently scheduled for this year. The option to have one is open should the club wish to pursue it. Winter Field Day activities will be conducted at the farm of Steve Webre in Church Point. Tentative plans are to finish tuning and deploy the club’s 80/40 portable dipoles along with the club’s two VHF/HF go-kits. If weather permits, mobilization of the club’s communications and antenna trailers will be considered. Chris will submit a flyer to be sent to the membership informing them of the planned activities and requesting from them an indication of their attendance plans. Paul McCasland N5KNY stated that the Lafayette Science Museum (LSM) will be celebrating its 50th anniversary this year and suggested the club consider conducting a special event in conjunction with the LSM anniversary. Additional club events tentatively planned for 2019 include AARA Hamfest in March, ARRL Field Day in June and the Tour de Teche canoe race in October.

 

HAMFEST

Hamfest Chairman Brandon Stelly KG5LQM and Galen Wilson KF5BET updated the group on preparations for this year’s hamfest. The event will be held March 8 – 9 at the Rayne Civic Center. Access to the facility on Thursday may not be available so additional manpower will be needed to Friday to help get vendors unloaded and set up. Crawfish and music is planned. Recommendations for items to sell in the Sweet Shop are requested. Hamfest Chairman Brandon Stelly KG5LQM updated the group on the status of preparations for this year’s hamfest. The event will be held March 8 – 9 at the Rayne Civic Center. Ways to increase revenue to offset increased facility rental fees were discussed along with ways to increase attendance by the public. Having the Rayne city government co-sponsor the event will be evaluated in more detail. Galen and Glen will start contacting last year’s vendors to determine their participation in this year’s event. Brandon will register this year’s event with the ARRL and will update the membership during the tonight’s general meeting.

 

EMMCOM

Glen Thibodeaux KF5FNP updated the group on Skywarn activities. He encouraged everyone to participate in the 2 meter net held each Tuesday night. Additional informal training exercises are planned to be conducted after the voice net is over. These activities will focus on digital communications such as VHF and HF Winlink communications using peer-to-peer and gateway connections. Everyone is encouraged to learn and practice their digital communication skills. He also updated the group on the trial digipeater installation held in November at the W5EXI repeater site in Duson. There were no issues temporarily converting the repeater to a 2 meter packet Winlink gateway. Several stations passed packet Winlink traffic thru the system including a station from the Pontchatoula area that accessed the gateway thru a digipeater in Livingston Parish. The gateway stayed up for several weeks and experienced no performance issues. Since Winlink is the preferred method of communications by GOHSEP into their EOC in Baton Rouge, permanent installation of a packet Winlink gateway station will be further evaluated.

 

Monday Night Net

Chris commended Barrett Oge KG5SSO for volunteering to be a net control station for the Monday Night Net. He also encouraged all members to participate in the net and consider serving in the net control rotation.

 

Miscellaneous

Larry Leblanc mentioned to the group that more and more of the new, high performance radios are Software Defined Radios (SDR) and encouraged everyone to learn more about SDR radios. Receive only SDR receivers such as models from Airspy and SDRplay are also very popular and can be used as Panadapters and wide coverage general receivers. He also encouraged everyone to consider radios capable of being computer controlled for their next purchases. Dave Redfearn N4ELM encouraged everyone to look into using small single board computers such as Arduinos and Raspberry PI’s combined with other small form factor modules to build inexpensive transceivers to do specific radio functions. Galen Wilson reported that he was approached by the director of a multi-day, long distance trail race held in an unspecified portion of the Kisatchie Forest inquiring if our club would consider providing radio communications in support of the race. The race is conducted continuously throughout the 2-1/2 day event and radio communications between first aid stations is needed. The group expressed a strong interest in participating in the event. However, due to the short time frame available to evaluate the currently unknown logistical and communications issues the club chose to not participate in this year’s event but would like to consider participating in next year’s event. Steve Webre volunteered to make a scouting trip to the race location to learn more about the logistical and communication issues that would need to be addressed.

 

HAM RADIO AND DIGITAL MODES

By Larry Leblanc KE5KJD dated January 16, 2019

This past Saturday a group of hams gathered at the Science Museum to “play” with radio in digital modes. We were hosted by Paul McCasland on the bottom floor of the Lafayette Science Museum. Paul explaided the use of the weak signal software and demonstrated how to make contacts with others. Several hams then gave it a try. He also showed how stations that heard the signals could be seen on PskReporter, an application that records each station that logged the contact on a map of the world. We all had a good time learning about the FT8 signal mode and how it can be used to see how your station is working. Present were KF5FNP and his wife, KE5AHD, KG5SSO, KI5ARX, KD5NVC, KE5KJD, N5KNY, and KD5JSM (and I may have missed a few). Danny had some hardware troubles with his station, debugged by all present, and finally fixed by late afternoon. All in all it was a very productive day. This proves that all it takes to keep hams interested is a radio (working or not) and an operator. We are all looking forward to Winter Field day at Steve’s farm. Included are a few pictures of the event.

Larry, KE5KJD.

 

AARA WINTER FIELD DAY 2019

by Chris Ancelet N5MCY

It all started on a cool morning at the farm of Steve (AF5VR) and Mel Webre in Church Point, LA. Although the temperature was cool, we all knew that once the sun came up, it would turn out to be a very nice January day. We had a relatively good turn out and we were able to get a few things accomplished. For starters, we knew that the club had a few 80/40 NVIS antennas that were constructed but had never been tuned, so we opted to get those two antennas ready for deployment. After deploying the antenna trailer, we hiked the mast up which allowed us to string up the diploes for tuning. With a trusty ole antenna analyzer and 6 subject matter experts, what could possibly go wrong? Both antennas were tuned to perfection and one of them was left deployed to be used in making the WFD contacts. Meanwhile, on the opposite end of the property, Glen Thibodeaux (KF5FNP) had deployed his mobile communications box, which is a converted military communications shelter. Turns out, Glen has this shelter set up quite nice with quick deployable antennas, HF/VHF and digital communication capabilities. Albeit small, this shelter is obviously a great tool for mobile communications, able to be quickly set up and functioning in no time flat. Dave Redfern (N4ELM) was also set up on the south side of the property with a QRP vertical and an array of cool gadgets, solar chargers and batteries. It is always a pleasure to see Dave set up and see just how small and compact your go-kit can be to make distant contacts. Overall, the day was a complete success and I am currently awaiting a final number of contacts made for our first 2019 Club event. Even though our participation is more on the leisure side of contesting, we always try and turn these events into a trouble shooting/building/tinkering/testing/mobile set up kind of day. It is always good to get out with friends and share stories, failures and have a few laughs in the process. I would be remised if I didn’t thank Steve (AF5VR) and Mel Webre again for allowing us to utilize their extraordinary property and facility. If you missed out on the January 26 event, I can assure you that you missed a good time. Here is a list of AARA Members who attended the 2019 Winter Field Day. Steve Webre – AF5VR Glen Thibodeaux – KF5FNP David McCutcheon – KG5JHR Dave Redfern – N4ELM Tom Dischler – W5OHJ Barrett Oge – KG5SSO Greg Richard – KE5AHD Jim Bookter – N5NVP Michael Cavell – KI5ARX Paul McCasland – N5KNY Fred Marshal – W5MLE Chris Ancelet – N5MCY

 

REGION 4 SKYWARN NET

Each Tuesday night at 7:00 PM (local), the Region 4 SkyWarn Net will take place on the 145.370 SkyWarn repeater in Lafayette. Net Control Operators will alternate each week. In case the 145.370 repeater fails, the net will be held on the 146.820 W5DDL repeater PL Tone 103.5. The February schedule can be found at this link: http://www.w5ddl.org/clubsite/news/htm When using the SkyWarn 145.370 repeater, be sure to use the receiver PL Tone for your area as follows: NW Quadrant 114.8 – NE Quadrant 127.3 – SW Quadrant 141.3 – SE Quadrant 94.8 – Central 103.5.

 

FIRECRACKERS

From Ray W5EW

Ingredients: ~ Saltine Crackers—4 rows or a box of Nabisco “Mini” crackers ~ Canola Oil—1/3 cup per row of crackers or 1/2 cup for 1 box of Mini crackers ~ Ranch Dressing MIX—1 package(1 ounce) or 1 heaping tablespoon ~ Ground Red Pepper—-2 to 3 tablespoons Instructions: Pour Canola oil in a measuring cup and add Ranch Dressing Mix and Ground Red Pepper. Mix thoroughly. Place crackers in a gallon zip lock bag. Pour entire container of previously mixed ingredients into bag over crackers. Close bag and roll around to mix crackers with ingredients. Let stand for an hour and rotate bag 3 or 4 times to promote a good mixture. After an hour or so all they need is eating!

 

FCC Information Service Toll Free (WATS) for Amateur Radio license inquiries about new/ vanity call signs: 1-888-225-5322 This will connect you the FCC National Call Center, handled by the FCC’s Consumer Information Bureau. Amateurs having ULS problems or questions should contact the FCC’s ULS Technical Support staff at: 202-414-1250 or: ulscomm@fcc.gov. FCC Website: http://wireless.fcc.gov/uls/ New call sign information can also be obtained from the ARRL/ VEC at 860-594-3000. http://www.arrl.org/arrlvec The mailing address to the FCC is: Federal Communications Commission, 445 12th Street SW Washington, DC 20554.

 

REGION 8:

Submitted by Joe Holland

KB5VJY

LA Section PIC

Region 8 ARRS ADEC

 

The Louisiana Delta Radio Club in Region 8 held a Ham Study group February 8th and 9th at the District 8 EOC.  4 new technicians passed their test, and one extra upgraded..

 

Pine Hills Amateur Radio Association has voted in it’s 2019 officers.. Jerry AD5AQ – President, Rex KI5BUE Vice President, Joe KB5VJY Secretary, Bill KF5NQQ Treasurer .. Congratulations

 

The Louisiana Tech Amateur Radio Club and the Louisiana Tech Aerospace department launched a weather balloon on February  16th.  Part of the balloon had an APRS Tracker payload. The Balloon made a easternly track from its’ launch point and was trackable for the better part of an hour. The balloon achieved 40,000 feet before a GPSr failure caused the balloon untrackable over Vicksburg, Ms.

 

The Northeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club has announced that on April, 27th 2019, they will be hosting their 2019 hamfest at the West Monroe convention center.  More information can be found on their facebook page, facebook.com/groups/NELARC

 

NELA Facebook Pages:

facebook.com/groups/kc5dr     Louisiana Delta Radio Club

facebook.com/groups/nelarc    North Louisiana Amateur Radio Club

facebook.com/groups/kq5tphara   Piney Hills Amateur Radio Association

facebook.com/groups/w5hgt     Louisiana Tech Amateur Radio Club

 

NELA Nets

147.135  + LDRC District 8 ARES Training Net                 Mondays 6:30pm

146.550  –  LDRC District 8 ARES Simplex Training Net   Mondays 6:45pm

147.120  +  PHARA ARES Training Net                            Mondays 7:00pm

146.790  –   Jonesboro La Area Net                                   Mondays 7:30pm

147.120  +  PHARA Newcomers Net                                 Mondays 8:30pm

146.550       Baloney Sammich Net  (Winnsboro)              Thursdays 7:30pm

147.060  +   Winnfield Repeater net                                   Thursdays 8:00pm

 

The Louisiana ARES 80HF Net meets on Sunday evenings at 6:30pm on 3848khz

 

 

REGION 9:

The SELARC “Hamster”

*Serving Amateur Radio Since 1974*

Published Monthly by the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club Inc.
P.O. Box 1324, Hammond LA 70404
Visit our website: www.selarc.org

Vol. 46, No. 2 ………………………….. February 2019

 

SELARC 2019 Hamfest

The Hammond Hamfest held on January 19, 2019, was a resounding success with excellent turnout.
Photos from the event have been added to the SELARC website on the page: Hamfest 2019 Photos

A message from Hamfest Chairman and SELARC President Tyrone – N5XES:

On behalf of the SELARC membership, I would like to thank everyone who braved the weather and attended our Hamfest. It was great to see old friends and new acquaintances, if only for a quick handshake and “how’s the family”.

The Hamfest VE session went well with 5 new Technicians’ and two upgrades! Many thanks to the VEs’ who came out to help with this session, your dedication is greatly appreciated! Listed in the prize section of our Hamfest page will be a list of the winners of the major prizes, congratulations to them also, without the large attendance we had, this event would not have been possible.

To our Vendors and Swap tables, a very special thank you for attending this event. Without your new products and used equipment this event would not have been possible!

Lastly, I would like to extend a heart-felt THANK YOU to all the SELARC members who came out to help with this event. YOU, are the backbone of this organization. To the dedicated few, who go that extra mile to make sure that SELARC is always headed in a positive direction, you are the best!

Hoping to see everyone again next year for our 39th Annual SELARC Hammond Hamfest on 18 January, 2020!

73
Tyrone – N5XES
SELARC – President / Hamfest Chairman

 

Special Events, Other Hamfests & VE Sessions

2019 Orange HamFest – February 23, 2019, at Orange County Convention & Expo Center – more information…

59th Acadiana Hamfest 2019 – ARRL Louisiana State Convention – Fri Mar. 8th and Sat Mar 9, 2019, at the Rayne Civic Center – more information…

NELA Hamfest 2019 – Sat. April 27, 2019, West Monroe Convention Center, more details..

Hammond VE Group – ARRL/W5YI tests are scheduled for the last Sunday of each month [with the exception of holiday conflicts] in Room “B” of the North Oaks Medical System Diagnostic Center at 2pm with $15 testing fee. Bring photo ID and any appropriate CSCE. For more information contact n5xes@arrl.net or Find an Amateur Radio License Exam in Your Area.

 

In Sympathy —

We express our deepest condolences for the friends and family of SELARC member, now silent key: Albert Edgar Baker – Al KF5IBW – 82, who passed away on Friday, January 25, 2019, at his home in Tickfaw, Louisiana.

 

VE Session Results –

Congratulations to the following new HAMs and upgrades from the SELARC Hammond Hamfest VE Session.

Technician

Timothy Isom Jr. – Mandeville, La.
Kaydin Morgan – Denham Springs, La.
John A. Cavell – Baton Rouge, La.
Cris Parker – Pacayune, Ms.
Daniel Sillenger – Covington, La.

General

Jeff Sibley / KG5YDE Livingston, Tx.

Extra

Roger Peters / KG5ZLE – Denham Springs, La.

Many thanks to all the VEs’ who came out to participate in the Hammond VE roup Exam Session held at our SELARC Hammond Hamfest. For those of you who did check-in to see if we had enough volunteers, thank you! In the future, if you arrive at a VE Session but there are sufficient VEs’ on hand, please sign-in with the VE Liason, so that you will at least be logged in as showing up and will get credit for being there!

Again, thank you es 73
Tyrone Burns – N5XES

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

 

ARES:

 

ARES Monthly Section Emergency Coordinators Report

JAN 2019

Total number of ARES members  355

Number of ARES nets active  43

Number of nets with NTS liaison  1

Number of exercises and training  32 for 238 hours

Number of public service events this month    2 for 22 hours

Number of emergency operations this month  0

Number of SKYWARN operations this month  0

Total=  34 activities for 260 hours

 

Submitted by James Coleman, AI5B

Section Emergency Coordinator

 

New Plan Aligns ARES with the Needs of Served Agencies
02/19/2019
http://www.arrl.org/…/new-plan-aligns-ares-with-the-needs-o…

The new ARES Plan adopted by the ARRL Board of Directors at its Annual Meeting in January represents an effort to provide ARES with a clearly defined mission, goals, and objectives; specific training requirements, and a system for consistent reporting and record-keeping. The Board’s Public Service Enhancement Working Group (PSEWG) spent more than 3 years crafting the ARES Plan which, ARRL officials believe, provides a much-needed update of the program’s role in public service and emergency preparedness in the 21st century. Concerns focused on bringing ARES into alignment with the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS), and creating more consistent and standardized ARES training requirements. Given dramatic changes and upgrades in national, regional, and local emergency and disaster response organizations, ARRL faced a major challenge, said ARRL Great Lakes Division Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK, who chaired the PSEWG.

“If we didn’t address these issues, such as training standards and organizational management, ARES faced the very real possibility that it would no longer be viewed as a valid and valuable partner in emergency and disaster relief situations,” Williams said.

With input from ARES members and a peer review team, and the assistance of emergency response officials with some partner organizations, the PSEWG came up with a plan that provides guidelines to ensure that ARES remains a service of organized, trained, qualified, and credentialed Amateur Radio volunteers who can provide public service partners with radio communication expertise, capability, and capacity, Williams added.

A drafted ARES Plan was circulated among ARRL Section Managers (SMs) and Section Emergency Coordinators (ECs) to gather feedback. During the comment period from August through October 2018, the PSEWG heard from 55 ARRL Sections, representing 40 states — more than 125 pages of feedback in all. The PSEWG expressed appreciation to all who submitted comments and ideas.

The PSEWG reviewed every comment and suggestion, identifying about a dozen key items commonly cited by those in the Field Organization to improve the plan.

Based on input from ARES participants, the training requirements in the final ARES Plan consist of the free FEMA Professional Development Series. The series comprises these independent study (IS) courses: 120.c, 230.d, 235.c, 240.d, 241.b, 242.b, and 244.b (as they may be amended), as well as the ARRL’s EC-001 and EC-016 emergency communication courses. As part of adopting the ARES Plan, the ARRL Board approved a proposal to make the ARRL EC courses free for ARES members.

The plan highlights some additional training programs that ARES participants are encouraged to consider taking, but that are not required, such as AUXCOMM and training courses like ICS-300 and ICS-400.

The ARES Plan outlines a three-tiered membership structure based on increased responsibility levels and accompanying training requirements. Although the tiers are not a required path, they serve to define three distinct ways to participate in the ARES program; it’s up to the participant to determine his or her level of involvement.

The ARES Plan points out that public service events such as parades and marathons are within the realm of ARES activity and are, in fact, a key part of it, because such events are an integral part of effective training.

In recognizing the local and regional nature of emergency communication needs in disaster response activations, the Plan notes that training requirements are ultimately the responsibility of the Section Manager, with each SM approving training for local ARES teams, as local conditions and needs dictate.

The ARES Plan also highlights the relationship between ARES and the National Traffic System (NTS). The PSEWG indicated that it will continue moving forward with efforts to find ways to refine and strengthen that relationship.

While the intent of the ARES Plan is to align the ARES organizational structure with the NIMS and ICS systems, Williams noted that, within the ARES structure, the Emergency Coordinator (EC) will continue to lead the ARES team locally during an incident, while the District and Section Emergency Coordinators will continue to serve as resources and support for the EC. (The emergency preparedness staff at ARRL is in the process of updating the EC manual.) The ARES Plan stresses that ARES participants are not first responders, and it encourages ARES leaders to develop and grow their group’s partnerships with state emergency management agencies and officials. Williams said the adoption of the ARES Plan is not the end of this process.

“ARES cannot remain stagnant only to be updated once every few generations,” he said. “The ARES Plan, and the ARES program, must be able to evolve.” Williams added that the ARRL Headquarters emergency preparedness staff will review the program annually to ensure its continued relevance.

ARRL.ORG

American Radio Relay League | Ham Radio Association and Resources

The American Radio Relay League (ARRL) is the national association for amateur radio, connecting hams around the U.S. with news, information…

 

——————————————————————————————————————————————

Section Traffic Manager Report

January 2019

 

SESSIONS  QNI  QTC  QTR

 

16               135   30    150

 

73,

Jimmy Lewis

Louisiana Section Traffic Manager

——————————————————————————————————————————————

Contests:

March 2019
2-3      International DX– Phone
April 2019
14       Rookie Roundup – Phone
June 2019
8-10     June VHF
15         Kids Day
22-23    Field Day
July 2019
13-14   IARU HF World Championship
August 2019
3-4  222 MHz and Up Distance Contest
17-18   10 GHz & Up – Round 1
18        Rookie Roundup – RTTY
September 2019
14-16    September VHF
21-22    10 GHz & Up – Round 2
21-22    EME – 2.3 GHz & Up

 

——————————————————————————————————————————————

 

MONTHLY BOOK GIVE-A-WAY

I will be going “Facebook Live” at noon March 1st to announce the February winners for the Book Give-A-Way.  If you have already sent your callsign to me , no need to send again….Please remember you MUST be an current ARRL Member to win….ALL ARRL LA Section Affiliated Clubs will be in the drawing as well……I will make the appropriate announcements following the drawing as well…….

 

I hope to see many of you at the Rayne Hamfest in March!

73,

LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER JANUARY 2019

ARRL LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER JANUARY 2019
I am hoping that each of you had a Safe and Happy beginning to the New
Year!
I am looking forward to seeing as many of you as possible in 2019.
I am beginning 2019 with 2 Book Giveaway’s; one for individual ARRL
members and the second for ARRL Affiliated Active Clubs.  I have gone
Facebook “Live” and posted not only on Facebook but also my Section
Manager’s email and ARES Google groups email about it.  I will be
giving away ARRL publications on the 1st of each month.  I am
automatically entering ALL ACTIVE CLUBS and have received many entries
from individual members.  Once you enter by sending me your call sign
you will be entered all year. I will go Facebook “Live” at noon on
the 1st of each month and then make the appropriate posts to notify
everyone who won for that month.  So if you have not sent me your call
sign and wish to enter please email me at K5JMR@ARRL.ORG, text me at
318-572-7917 or send me a Facebook message or respond to one of my posts
on the LA Section page or LA ARES page.  If your club is not currently
active; please go to ARRL.ORG and update your club’s profile and I
will add your club to the monthly drawing.
The Hammond Hamfest just concluded and we had a wonderful time attending
as always.  It was very well attended and the ARRL forums were also.
Thanks to SELARC for all you do!!!
We revealed our 2018 LA Section Amateur of the Year at the hamfest and
the award goes to……..
JIM RAGSDALE, W5LA of West Monroe.  Jim was unable to attend but we will
meet with him in early February at his local club meeting and get his
award to him.  We had several very worthy nominations and I thank those
who submitted them all….Again, Congratulations to our winner…Jim
Ragsdale!
SILENT KEYS
CHARLES P. WINDER, JR K5FNN
NEW HAMS
Report for 2019-01-04
John C Corlis, KI5CTG
Michael J Sax, KI5CTM
David P Arceneaux, KI5CTE
Mabel D Fisher, KI5CTI
Jeffrey A Willis, KI5CTP
Levi A Calvert, KI5CTF
Ludvig S Natell, KI5CNE
James M Tully, KI5CTO
Chelsea Edwards, KI5CTH
Anthony Rosal, KI5CTL
Natalie C Morvant, KI5CTQ
David W Frederick, KI5CTJ
Earl L Galle, KI5CTK
Brandon A Sanders, KI5CNC
Daniel W Schmolke, KI5CTN
Paul E Mobley, KI5CLZ
Shannon R Benedict, KI5CRZ
Carol L Venable, KI5CSA
Douglas Bain, KI5CRY
John C Bailes, KI5CRX
Gary K Kaufman, KI5CQZ
Kevin C Kimray, KI5CSS
NEW ARRL MEMBERS
Report for 2019-01-04
Brandon A Sanders, KI5CNC
Charles M Morgan, AA5SH
Nathan J Daigrepont, KF5HXB
Doran L Bullock, KF5ZKG
David C Jacobson, KB5VUR
Cory R Rogers, KG5QCU
Bobby L Brownlee, WB5OSD
David E Fogleman, AE5UW
JB Paul
Douglas Bain, KI5CRY
Paul D Wiedemeier, KE5LKY
Glen E Deas, K5GED
Glenn R Guillory, AA5NM
Thomas J Bird, WJ5Y
FROM THE ARRL
FCC Outlines Impact on its Operations of Potential Funding Lapse
01/02/2019
The FCC said in a January 2 Public Notice that in the event of a
continued partial lapse in federal government funding, it will suspend
“most operations” at mid-day on Thursday, January 3. Some systems
that have gone dark in prior government shutdowns will remain
operational this time, however. That includes the FCC website, although
it will not be updated except for matters related to spectrum auction
activities and those necessary for the protection of life and property.
until normal operations resume. The FCC Daily Digest will continue to
appear.
The Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS), the Universal Licensing
System (ULS), the Electronic Document Management System (EDOCS), and the
Commission Online Registration System (CORES) will remain available, but
no support will be provided except that necessary for spectrum auction
activity. Processing of Amateur Radio applications will come to a halt,
however, said ARRL Volunteer Examiner Coordinator (VEC) Assistant
Manager Amanda Grimaldi, N1NHL.
Also down will be the Consumer Complaint Center and the Experimental
Licensing System, among several others
Still available will be the Network Outage Reporting System (NORS), the
Disaster Information Reporting System (DIRS), the Public Safety Support
Center (PSSC), the Licensing Management System (LMS), the Consolidated
Database System (CDBS), the Auctions Public Reporting System (PRS), the
Auction Application System, and the Auction Bidding System.
“All other Commission electronic filing and database systems will be
unavailable to the public until normal agency operations resume,” the
FCC said.
Third Wednesday Monthly Communications Exercises Set
01/02/2019
FEMA Region 10 will conduct monthly communications exercises (COMMEX) on
the third Wednesday of each month, starting on January 16, 1730 – 1900
UTC. Amateur Radio operators are invited to take part. The intent of
these exercises is to test and exercise interoperable communication
(federal/state/local/tribal/Amateur Radio) during a major disaster in
which the communication infrastructure is significantly damaged or
destroyed.
FEMA Region 10 will use the call sign WGY910. Other stations associated
with agencies and organizations that provide response support in
accordance with the National Response Framework are encouraged to
participate.
The COMMEX will use these “dial” or “window” frequencies on 60
meters — including 5,330.5 kHz, 5,346.5 kHz, 5,357.0 kHz, 5,371.5 kHz,
and 5,403.5 kHz — as part of the exercise. The area of operation is
the continental US.
FCC Reaches $900,000 Settlement in Unauthorized Satellite Launch Case
01/02/2019
The FCC has settled an investigation into an alleged unauthorized launch
and operation of small satellites by Swarm Technologies. The company
agreed to a Consent Decree that included a $900,000 penalty, an extended
period of FCC oversight, and a requirement of pre-launch notices to the
FCC, among other stipulations.
“We will aggressively enforce the FCC’s requirements that companies
seek FCC authorization prior to deploying and operating communications
satellites and earth stations,” FCC Enforcement Bureau Chief Rosemary
Harold said. “These important obligations protect other operators
against radio interference and collisions, making space a safer place to
operate.”
In April 2017, Swarm applied for an Experimental license to deploy and
operate two Earth stations and four tiny 0.25 U CubeSats called
SpaceBEEs. The FCC denied Swarm’s application in December 2017 over
concerns about the ability to track the satellites. Swarm nevertheless
launched the satellites on January 12, 2018, on a vehicle that also
carried an Amateur Radio satellite into space. After reports of the
unauthorized SpaceBEEs launch surfaced, the FCC launched an
investigation last March.
The FCC determined that Swarm had launched the four SpaceBEEs from India
and had unlawfully transmitted signals between Earth stations in Georgia
and the satellites for more than a week. In addition, the FCC discovered
that Swarm had also performed unauthorized weather balloon-to-ground
station tests and other unauthorized equipment tests prior to the
launch. All these activities required FCC authorization.
The December resolution requires Swarm to pay a penalty $900,000 to the
US Treasury and to submit pre-launch reports to the FCC for the next 3
years. The FCC said Swarm has committed to a strict compliance plan to
prevent future FCC rule violations.
The FCC issued an Enforcement Advisory last April to remind satellite
operators that they must obtain FCC authorization for space station and
Earth station operations. The advisory cautioned satellite operators and
launch companies against proceeding with launch arrangements following a
license denial or prior to receiving an FCC authorization.
WRTC 2022 Organizing Committee Unveils New Website, Initial
Qualification Rules
01/02/2019
The World Radiosport Team Championship 2022 (WRTC 2022) Organizing
Committee has debuted its official website as well as the Initial
Qualification Rules — already under debate — to be selected as a
WRTC 2022 team leader. While 2022 may seem a long way off, the
qualifying events — 24 in all — take place between February 2019 and
November 2020. Each qualifying event has a point value that’s used in
calculating qualifying scores, and each entry category has been assigned
a weighting factor.
“Please don’t think that WRTC is only for Top Guns,” the
announcement said. “You might have a chance.” According to the
announcement, WRTC 2022 Selection Areas are much smaller, so that
operators on all continents will have more chances to qualify. Team
leaders, once established, will select a team member from among the top
applicants who did not qualify as team leaders. “WRTC 2022 is now for
everybody. The only things that you will need are commitment,
motivation, and skill!” the announcement said.
An email reflector has been set up to field “suggestions, corrections,
and new ideas” on the Initial Qualification Rules, and the Final
Qualification Rules will be published on January 31.
The first qualifying event is the ARRL International DX Contest CW. WRTC
2022 will be held in Bologna, Italy
January 31 is the Deadline to Submit ARRL Foundation Scholarship
Applications
12/28/2018
The ARRL Foundation Scholarship program will accept applications from
eligible applicants until January 31, 2019. All applicants must be
FCC-licensed radio amateurs, and many scholarships have other specific
requirements, such as intended area of study, ARRL Division, Section or
state, and license class. Applicants should review the scholarships and
check off the ones for which they are eligible.
More information is on the ARRL Foundation Scholarship Program page.
This year, the Foundation Board of Directors is offering several new
scholarships. These include The Joel R. Miller (W7PDX) and Martha C.
Miller STEM Scholarship, The East Coast Amateur Radio Service (ECARS)
Scholarship, The Palomar Amateur Radio Club Scholarship, and The Dick
Warren, K6OBS, Memorial Scholarship.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
CONTEST CALENDER
February 2019
11-15  School Club Roundup
16-17  International DX – CW
March 2019
2-3      International DX– Phone
April 2019
14      Rookie Roundup – Phone
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ARES
December LA Section Report
Total members: 353
Active nets: 35  w/NTS Liaison: 1
#Exercises/Training:  24  for 169 hours
#Public Service Events:  1  for 12 hours
#Emergency Events: 0
#Skywarn Events:  2  for 33 hours
Total:  27 Events for 214 hours
Submitted by Jim Coleman AI5B
LA Section Emergency Coordinator
Remember to sign up for ARES CONNECT at:
Please welcome and congratulate our new ARES ASEC who will be in charge
of “ALL – THINGS” ARES CONNECT…Corey McCrary W5MMC.  Corey will
manage LA Section ARES CONNECT and be our Section Liaison to HQ.
Please congratulate longtime ARES member Ed Mason KE5GMN who was
appointed to replacing the retiring Bob Priez as Region 9 DEC.  Ed was
ADEC for Bob and will make an awesome DEC.  We honored Bob at the recent
Hammond Hamfest for his long time service.
Also new appointment Thomas Bird WJ5Y EC for Sabine Parish.  Thomas
replaces Cecil Harper who passed away not too long ago.
ARES E-LETTER
——————————————————————————————————————————-
AROUND THE STATE:
REGION 2
BATON ROUGE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB
RF News JANUARY 2019
The 2019 Oicers and three new directors were
elected at the November club meeting.  They
were installed at the December banquet.
  BRARC monthly Board meetings are held at
6:30 PM on the first Tuesday of each month.
There is a new location for the Board meetings.
All Board meetings will be held at the Fairwood
Branch Library at 12910 Old Hammond Hwy,
Baton Rouge, La 70816.  All club members are
welcome to attend Board meetings
Annual Club Dues are DUE!
Checks, cash or credit cards are accepted at any club meeting.
NEW OPTION! Pay online at brarc.org
CLUB MEETINGS/VE SESSION
JANUARY 29, 2019 – CLUB MEETING, MAIN LIBRARY (GOODWOOD BLVD)
        6 PM VE TESTING SESSION (ARRIVE BY 5:45 PM)
        7 PM CLUB MEETING: DX SUPER STATION (K3LR)
FEBRUARY 5, 2019 – BRARC BOARD MEETING, FAIRWOOD LIBRARY
          6:30 PM
FEBRUARY 26, 2019 – CLUB MEETING, BLUEBONNET LIBRARY
          7 PM
NETS
BRARC PUBLIC SERVICE NET – SUNDAY 8:30 PM 146.790 (PL TONE 107.2)
ARES NET – SUNDAY 8 PM 146.790 (PL TONE 107.2)
10 M NET – MONDAY 7:30 PM 28.450 MHZ USB
STRAIGHT KEY NIGHT
By Dana Browne, AD5VC
  It’s quite dierent from many on-air activities. Put down the
microphone, set aside the electronic keyer, and unplug the digital
sound card. Forget canned high speed exchanges of a perfect signal
report and little more. Instead, plug in a manual CW key and have a
chat on the air. Get to know one of the thousands of hams who share
your love of radio. Straight Key Night (SKN), which runs from 0000-
2359 UTC on Jan 1, harkens back to the most basic of radio: turn the
transmitter on and o with a key, and decode the transmitted dits
and dahs with your head. The equipment isn’t fancy; many hams will
dust o vintage gear for the event.
  I nervously approached my first SKN in January 2006 with
a license just two months old. I could count my CW contacts on one
hand. I mean really nervous – I would end up sweating heavily if the
code speed crept much above 5 wpm. AGN? and QRS were constant
parts of my on-air vocabulary. I really worried at that time that every
operator would send blistering CW at me that would dissolve into
a continuous indecipherable burp of Morse. I learned that SKN is
very laid back. In reality, few hams can converse readily in CW above
20 wpm. Yes, we can handle canned exchanges like “599 K” at high
speed, but holding a rambling open-ended conversation with whole
words and sentences usually means the speed drops to well below
20 wpm. If you are using a manual key, it’s simple to match the
speed of the other station. That first SKN, I sent at 5 wpm, had a QSO
for more than an hour and 10 minutes, one of thirty minutes, and
three that were 15 minutes long.
  Thirteen years later, I am looking forward to SKN. My station
this year was a FT-857D at 70w and a 100 foot sloping center-fed
antenna. I used two dierent straight keys during the event. To
provide some strain relief, I switched to a side-swiper for one QSO,
and a bug for another. I currently can send continually at 15 wpm on
a straight key, so this is going to be just right for talking.
  My first contact was Pat in TX on 40m, calling slowly at 6-7
wpm. I would be surprised if he has completed more than a handful
of CW QSOs. Over 15 minutes, we exchange RST, our towns, our
names. He also sends me a SKCC number, and I send him mine.
SKCC is the Straight Key Century Club. It was founded in 2007 aer
SKN to continue the activity of manually generated CW during
the year. As a new CW op, I used SKCC contacts to build my skill in
sending and receiving. I enjoy giving newcomers a helping hand.
From his number, I can tell he has been a member for maybe a
month or two. Aer this basic exchange, he does not reply to a
request about what rig he is using. If he is anything like I was then,
he has probably had enough decoding.
  The next station I hear calling is Tom in NE. He sends slowly
and cleanly. In 10 minutes and 3 exchanges I learn the weather
in Lincoln, Nebraska. He also sounds like he is coming back to
CW aer a long absence, so I don’t press him to hold an extended
conversation.
  Then I have a chat with Andy in OH, who is using FLEX 6500
with a straight key, an interesting mix of the very new and very old.
The weather sounds cold and miserable there: cloudy, windy and
about 32F. He tries to tell me about his vertical antenna and his rig,
but the QSB wipes out most of the exchanges, so we give up about
aer 10 minutes.
  My first extended chat of the night comes at 0550 with
Joe in Ocala, FL on 40m. Joe is using a cold war spy radio with a
built in key. I can hear a slight chirp on his signal. I would guess we
conversed at 10-12 wpm, since it wasn’t easy for him to use the
built-
in key. His spy radio will tune from 3 mc to 22 mc (that’s megacycles
per second, not MHz, which shows the age of the rig). His transmitter
is rockbound with 2 W output. I learn he likes building kits and
vintage rigs. I tell him about the 80m Cricket that the LSU and Baton
Rouge clubs built. He says he has built crystal controlled kits, but his
next kit will be one with a VFO because he thinks it’s more fun to
use.
Aer about 35 minutes, he is starting to have trouble with the built-
in Morse key, and he admits he isn’t used to staying up so late, so we
call it quits.
  When I get up New Year’s Day, I test out 20m. At 1900 I chat
with James who lives near Rochester NY. It is nearly freezing where
he is, and he is using a vertical with radials. Since I have a really
good
589 signal from him, we talk about how many radials he uses (3 per
band) on his 8 band vertical. I think I understand why the vertical I
used to use with 3 radials stuck in the cracks in my backyard patio
never worked that well. Aer 30 minutes we sign.
  Next is Rex in Yerington, NV. Yes, I really did copy the QTH
on the air. He was licensed in Jan 2017. His CW is slow (14 wpm) but
very clean and easy to copy. He has some trouble copying me with
QSB, so the QSO doesn’t last beyond 3 exchanges.
  As soon as he stops at 2000Z, I get a call from Eric in Valley
Center, KS. His weather is cold (20F) so he wishes he had our 70F.
He is using a Kent straight key. He is using a TS-140S to an end-fed
wire. He works at the KAKE TV station in Wichita. He is also a SKCC
member, so I exchange numbers with him. We talk about the month-
long K3Y event in January that the SKCC holds, where various
members put a 1×1 call (K3Y) on the air from all ten call areas. If you
work all the 10 call areas, you can print yourself a niy certificate.
There are also DX stations who participate, from France to Australia.
Aer about 45 minutes, we say goodbye.
  The last contact is from Al in Dothan, Al. His weather is
warm like ours. I mention that the town’s name is familiar to me
and I learn that it is on the road we take when we go to the Alabama
Gulf Shore. He is using a Elecra KX2 at 10W to an end-fed wire. I ask
him how he likes the KX2, and tell him about the Elecra KX3 that I
have. Aer about 25 minutes, it is time for me to stop for New
Year’s
supper.
  So that was it. I had interesting conversations with
strangers who share my fondness for amateur radio. It is a distinct
operating event from November Sweepstakes or Field Day, and
shows how broad the opportunities are in amateur radio. I’ll look
forward to doing it again next year.
CW PRACTICE
Have you learned Morse code and still haven’t gotten on the air?
Do you freeze up when someone answers your CQ? Are you so
slow that you’re too self-conscious to try? Then we have good
news for you!!
    Calling all CW wanna-be’s!! We are beginning a new activity – on
the air one-on-one slow code for those that have learned all the
letters and numbers, but don’t know what to do next. We will pair
up and agree to get together on the air at least once per week.
More oen is great! Every week, we’ll swap and get a new partner.
To participate you simply need to know all of your letters and numbers.
We even have a ‘cheat sheet’ with
the script to get you started with your first QSOs. Speed isn’t
important! Accuracy is everything.
  So if you can copy and send at any speed, get your name on the list at
the next meeting. We will get
you through your first few contacts, and you’ll soon be exchanging
SKCC numbers, chasing DX, and working
towards your CW WAS!
For more information, contact Jerry, AG5AY at 225-276-0721
ELMERS
The term “Elmer” was inspired by a ham radio operator named Elmer P.
“Bud” Frohardt Jr, W9DY.  In
a 1971 column in QST, Rod Newkirk, W9BRD, wrote about how Bud took the
time to help and mentor
new Amateur Radio licensees.  He wrote, “We need those Elmers.  All
the Elmers, including the ham
who took the most time and trouble to give you a push toward your
license, are the birds who keep
this great game young and fresh.”  Because of the time he invested
into new operators, Bud was able
to interest many people in “science, radio, DX, CW and electronics.”
The BRARC has some members that are available for mentoring and
answering questions from new
hams, or anyone who may need some additional information.
Buddy Brown, N5BUD Paul Catrou, WA4MXT
No need to be shy when you need help.  Along with these Elmers, the
BRARC has a wealth of
experienced operators who will help – all you have to do is ask.  To
help with this, simply email your
questions to xxxxxxxxxxxxx.
For those of you with all of that experience, share it with others.
Encourage our new members with
your expertise!
MEMBER SPOTLIGHT
Mike, N5MT
Source: www.ten-ten.org
Meet Mike, N5MT.  Mike Davidson, was recently recognized as the Top Op
of
Ten-Ten International.  This award is based upon the number of times a
10-10
member’s call appears on new 10-10 member applications.  Mike is active
in
Ten-Ten International.  He writes the DX column for the organization’s
quarterly
newsletter, Ten-Ten International News. He is also their countries
awards
manager.  Mike can oen be heard on the local 10 meter nets listed
below.
The Ten-Ten International Net, Inc. was formed back in 1962 as the
Ten-Ten Net
of Southern California. Its purpose was to promote activity and good
operating
practice on the 10 meter amateur band. The original group of operators
decided
to meet every day of the week except Sunday at 10:00am local time.  “See
you
on Ten at Ten” quickly became the 10-10 Net.
To become a member of the Ten-Ten International Net, it is required that
you
contact 10 10-10 members (on 10 meters) and list them on the
application.  As a
new member, you are assigned a unique “10-10 Number” which is retained
for
life.  You can then exchange it with other 10-10 members.  There are
numerous
awards for collecting 10-10 numbers.  The organization has grown and now
over
75,000 10-10 numbers have been issued world-wide.
“Ten-Ten International Net, Inc. is an organization dedicated to
assisting,
encouraging, and promoting amateur radio activity on the 10 Meter
amateur
band, using all lawful modes of operation and embracing new
technologies.
Our aim is to assist in the growth of amateur radio around the world, to
mentor
new members, and enhance fellowship among radio amateurs.
Local 10 meter nets
Baton Rouge Monday Night Net
Mondays at 7:30 PM on 28.450 MHz
Louisiana Pelican 10-10 Net
Saturdays at 10:10 AM on 28.450 MHz
YOUTH YAK
This month’s contributor: Brynn Hebert, KG5KRV
I would like to extend a huge thank you to the Baton Rouge Amateur Radio
Club.  It has provided me with so many opportunities I never would have
been exposed to without it.  I have completed many community service
activities with the club, including manning the Morse Code community
outreach table.  Not only has my involvement with the BRARC given me
service opportunities, I’m becoming closer to being fluent in another
language almost absentmindedly.  While I am operating the station and
helping people send their name in Morse Code, I am so immersed in the
activity that I don’t realize all that I am learning.  Since we’ve
started helping with these stations at community events, I’ve noticed
that I can easily identify some Morse Code.  When I got licensed 3 years
ago, I never would’ve believed you if you told me I would be able to
decode those dahs and dits.
Thank you to everyone who has helped me to learn so many new things
through the Baton Rouge
Amateur Radio Club!
Please join me in giving a big THANKS to Jen, K5NMT, for all of the work
she has done as Editor of the RF News for the past two years.  When I
heard that she was taking a break from the job, I thought I might give
it a try.  Having some experience with editing and formatting, I thought
it might be fun. I realize it looks dierent than past issues, but it
is my hope that you continue to enjoy reading it. I also hope that you
feel encouraged and welcome to contribute to it.  Please send articles
and tidbits that you would like shared with the membership.  Let me know
of topics that you would like to see covered.  Together we can continue
to make this newsletter outstanding.
  Radio provides our family with opportunities to meet new people, help
educate our community, as well as communicate clearly.  We have seen
growth in our abilities to hold conversations with new people, as well
as on the radio.  We’ve still got some room for growth, so we appreciate
any encouragement or conversations you have with us.
  We look forward to a great year in 2019!  I am looking forward to
hearing from you with thoughts and ideas this year!
BRARC has a healthy mix of license classes.  Let’s keep encouraging
our Technician and General class licensees to keep studying and striving
for the next class. You will see that there is a large
disparity in gender.  Appears to be a hobby that attracts the gentlemen;
however, we’ve seen a few more ladies attending in recent years.Also,
if you know anyone (male OR female) interested in learning more about
our hobby and is interested in getting a Technician license, please let
them know about our upcoming Technician class.  The next class will
begin in March 7 and last for 8 weeks, concluding with a VE session on
April 25.
For more information, consult http://
brarc.org/education/license-classes/
AMSAT has announced its 50th Anniversary Awards Program, to help
celebrate 50 years of keeping Amateur Radio in space. Satellite and HF
contacts can help participants to earn one of these awards:
  50th Anniversary AMSAT OSCAR Satellite Communications Achievement
Award
  50th Anniversary AMSAT Satellite Friends of 50 Award
  AMSAT on HF 50th Anniversary Award
  The 50th anniversary AMSAT OSCAR Satellite Communications Achievement
Award will be issued on one of the original goldenrod paper stock
certificates and signed by AMSAT’s founding President, Perry Klein, W3PK
(ex-K3TJE). “With only 20 original certificates available, this award
will certainly become a collector’s item,” AMSAT said.  Awards cost
$25, plus postage. Certificates will be sequentially numbered.
To receive the 50th Anniversary AMSAT Satellite Friends of 50 Award,
work 50 stations on any satellite — with a limit of one contact per
day — during 2019. Contacts may be made from various locations, as
long as the operator uses his or her personal call sign (with any
appropriate locators). This award is $15, plus postage. To achieve the
AMSAT on HF 50th Anniversary Award, work at least one AMSAT member on
any HF band in any mode. Additional award levels are based on the number
of AMSAT members you contact on the HF bands.
Complete details are on the AMSAT website.
ASCENSION AIRWAVES
The Official Journal of the Ascension Amateur Radio Club
JANAURY 2019
In Case You Missed It We did not hold a business meeting in December but
over some good food we did discuss several things. We will operate
Winter Field Day as a club from the 5th District Fire Station on Roddy
Road (where we keep the trailer). Since we do not have a vehicle to tow
it, this makes sense. We will put the trailer through a full exercise to
work the bugs out. We have filed the paperwork for our 501c3 status as a
club. It will take several months to get final approval but our
application has been accepted by the IRS before the shutdown and unless
we hear otherwise we are now a 501c3 organization! Ascension Office of
Homeland Security and Emergency is still working on the grant and will
hopefully have news by meeting time. AARC will have a table at the
Hammond Hamfest. Stop by and visit with us! David is working on an
Echolink node for the 225 machine and just got in RigBlaster interface.
He is planning on having it running before the meeting.
From The President
It’s the beginning of a new year. We usually think ahead to what we want
to do. Will 2019 be the year we upgrade our license? Or learn a new
mode? Will we save our pennies for a new radio, antenna or other item
for our radio shack? Will we mentor a new ham? Or make time to attend
meetings and events? Or have we done all that and this year will be the
year to just relax and enjoy what we have worked hard to achieve? I know
I have several items on my list to cross off. I started off this year by
putting up a new 80 meter dipole antenna. Next will be getting a new
VHF/UHF radio for my desk and putting up a better antenna and pole for
it. I am looking forward to the next few months and everything the club
has planned. We have come a long way in the past year and I can’t wait
to see where we are in another 12 months. We are starting off the new
calendar with our monthly meeting at the Ascension EOC. It will be the
beginning of our new “let’s have more fun” meeting concept. We are going
to spend less time conducting official business and more time on
programs and discussions. But there is a bit of business to get out of
the way. We have to nominate and elect officers for the new year. We
will plan our trip to the Hammond Hamfest where we will staff a table
and let others know about our great club. And we will go over a few
details relating to our Winter Field Day operations which will be a good
shakedown of our EmCom trailer and an Ascension Amateur Radio Club PO
Box 1617 Gonzales, LA 70707-1617 Steve Raacke KC5SAS President David
LeBlanc N5LEB Vice President Elmer Tatum N5EKF Secretary/Treasurer
ASCENSION AIRWAVES The Official Journal of the Ascension Amateur Radio
Club The opportunity for everyone to work some different bands. In
coming months we will have more guest speakers and presentations, some
purely social “coffee/breakfast” meetups and possibly Special Event
stations added to the calendar. Keep an eye on our usual social media
sites and newsletter as well as our new and improved website at
k5arc.org for any updates and announcements. And remember to get your
dues in. You can pay online via the website or at the meetings. Your
dues help with such things as paying the fees to incorporate and get our
501c3. We appreciate all of the support we receive from our members and
look forward to doing much more for you. Happy 2019 and 73, Steve
Raacke, KC5SAS
Local Club News & Events Baton Rouge Amateur Radio Club Jan 29 Regular
club meeting Goodwood Library 19:00 hrs. LOHSEP (Livingston Office of
Homeland Emergency Preparedness Amateur Radio Meets 3rd Thursdays of
month at OMV in Livingston at 18:30 local Acadiana Amateur Radio Club
The club has general meetings on the first (1st) Thursday of every month
@ 19:00 at the Lafayette Science Museum, 433 Jefferson St. MissLou Club
meetings are the last Thursday of the month at 6:30 PM at Kelly Farms at
2148 Highway 958 in Slaughter SELARC (Southeast Louisiana ARC- Hammond)
Meets Tuesday 8 Jan at the Ponchatoula Civic Center at 19:00 hrs talk-in
147.00- (107.2 pl) Bayou Region Amateur Radio Society (Thibodaux) Board
of Directors will meet Jan 12 at Terrebonne Parish Library in Gray at
13:00 hrs. Follow them on their websitewww.w5yl.org or newsletter at
https://w5yl.blogspot.com BEARS Morgan City Meets 2nd Wednesdays 18:00
hrs. at the Club radio room in downtown Morgan City. Talk in on 146.91-
BEARS will be doing a special events station for the Eagle Expo in
Morgan City in late February. Stay tuned for details in our next
Ascension Airwaves.
LWARN Linked Repeaters Livingston- 444.350 + pl 136.5 West Feliciana-
443.625 + pl 156.7 Greensburg- 442.275 + pl 156.7 Washington Parish-
442.425 + pl 156.7 EBR (Central)- 442.400 + pl 156.7 St Tammany Parish
443.425 + pl 156.7 These repeaters are part of the Governor’s Office
of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness (GOSHEP). Amateur
operators are welcome to use them
ACTIVE LOCAL REPEATERS Ascension 147.225+ (107.2 pl) Gonzales 146.985-
(107.2 pl) Convent/Sunshine Bridge 145.310- (107.2 pl) Port Vincent
28.211 (CW) K5ARC 10m beacon Livingston 147.165+ (107.2) LOHSEP 145.23-
(107.2) Fusion, Wires-X, DWARN 442.350+ (107.2) LOHSEP EBR 145.49-
Fusion/Wires-X, DWARN 146.88 D-Star (no reflector) 146.79- (107.2)
FM/C4FM 443.100+ (107.2 pl) 443.375+ Fusion/ Wires-X/DWARN Felicianas
53.83 (-1 MHz 107.2 pl) FM 146.835- (114.8 pl) FM, Echolink 443.850 (+5
MHz 107.2 pl) FM Lafourche/Terrebonne 147.30+ (114.8 pl) Fusion/FM Gray,
LA 147.39+ (114.8 pl)
Local Nets Sundays Post Office Net 3.905 MHz LSB 07:00 local ARES State
Wide 3.878 MHz LSB 19:00 local ARES Region 2 Net 146.79- 20:00 local
BRARC Club Net 146.79- 20:30 local
Mondays 10M Net 28.450 MHz USB 19:30 local Bayou Region Net 147.39+
19:00 local
Tuesdays LOHSEP ARC 147.165+ 19:30 local
Wednesdays MissLou 146.835- 20:00 local (EchoLink KD5UZA-R) SELSA Net
146.52 21:00 local Thursdays Livingston ARC 146.73- 19:00 hrs BEARS
Morgan City 146.91- 19:30 local (Echolink W5BMC-R) K5ARC Informal Net
147.225+ 20:00 hrs. local
Louisiana Section ARES Leaders and Coaches As your ARES members register
themselves in the new ARES CONNECT database, you may be asked questions.
Here are a few FAQs and the suggested answers that may be helpful. ·
QUESTION : What is ARES Connect? o ANSWER: “ARES Connect is a
volunteer management system that covers event signup, reporting, and
roster management,” ARRL Emergency Preparedness Manager Mike Corey,
KI1U, said. · QUESTION : I’m already registered as an ARES member
through the Louisiana Section webpage. Do I need to register again? o
ANSWER: Yes. The Louisiana database is being phased out. The ARES
CONNECT database will supersede and replace the Louisiana database. ·
QUESTION : How do I register in ARES Connect? • ANSWER: Please go to
the following link and create your account,
https://arrl.volunteerhub.com/lp/la · QUESTION : When I registered in
ARES CONNECT my Region and/or Parish was not listed. What should I do? o
ANSWER: This information is being inputted into the system by Ken
Bailey, Emergency Preparedness Assistant at the ARRL in Newington.
Recheck your data in a few weeks for updated information. · QUESTION :
To assist my ARES members should I as a DEC or EC register for them? o
ANSWER: Basic information on all Louisiana Section ARES members is being
inputted into the system by Ken Bailey, Emergency Preparedness Assistant
at the ARRL in Newington. Give him a few weeks to complete this task.
Additional information to follow during this period of transition to the
new system. Hope to see you soon at the 2019 Hamfests! James M. Coleman
AI5B Louisiana SEC
Parting Shots Just like death and taxes it is once again time to pay
dues. Last year we amended the Bylaws and set dues at $25 per person per
year. Thanks to those who have already paid in via the PayPal link on
our website. We have been making some improvements to the club so we
need your money! At least this year it will be tax deductible as we have
filed our paperwork for our 501c3. Once filed, the organization is
considered a charity (unless the application is rejected). There have
been some YUUGE breaks for the Club recently. Come to the meeting and
find out what they are! Sorry, no, we don’t have the new repeater yet
but will hopefully have an update on that news 73’s de N5EKF …-.-
——————————————————————————————————————————-
REGION 4
Volume 59, Number 01 ACADIANA AMATEUR RADIO ASSOC., INC
This month’s general meeting was held in conjunction with the club’s
annual Christmas Banquet. It was held at the Golden Corral restaurant
with approximately 40 people in attendance. Club President Chris Ancelet
N5MCY conducted the meeting and congratulated everyone on a successful
year of club activities and thanked them for their support. Among those
activities were the annual hamfest, support for the Tour de Teche canoe
race, and the Tabasco Sauce Anniversary and Veterans Day Special Events.
Chris also encouraged all members to be extra safe while conducting
holiday activities and particularly while traveling during the holidays.
Drawings were held for various door prizes that were donated by the
club. Door prize winners were: James Romero – K5CNU, Brandon Stelly –
KG5LQM, Melissa Cearley – W5MLC and Michael Cavell – KI5ARX. Prepared by
David McCutcheon.
Cecil Harper W5CQG / WR5Y – Silent Key I just saw this post by Mark
Hargrove this morning: posted Dec.7, 2018 It’s with great regret I
have received word that Cecil Harper has passed away. He was a good
friend that always had a smile and a story to tell. He was a ham and
gave a lot to the hobby. He was also very active in his church as well.
He will be missed. RIP Mr. Cecil Harper Even though Cecil had been sick
he did his best to help all he could with ARES not only in Region 6 but
statewide. Cecil will be missed. He had recently changed his call from
W5CQG to WR5Y. Funeral arrangements are pending. John Mark Robertson
K5JMR LA Section Manager
Below is from Cecil Harper’s QRZ.COM Biography page:
I am 73 years ‘young’ and have been licensed for 39 years. I am also
retired from the Louisiana State Prison System. I was born and raised in
Port Neches, Texas and graduated from Carlsbad High School in New
Mexico. I worked at the Port Arthur, Texas Texaco Refinery for 13 years
and transferred to Louisiana with Texaco. In 1986 I started working for
the prison system where I later retired in 2004. I moved back to Texas
and presently live here on Toledo Bend lake about 60 miles north of
Jasper, Texas. I have been the Emergency Coordinator for Sabine Parish,
Louisiana for the past ten years. That sure is an experience, but things
seem to be going fine. I hope and pray it stays that way. I am a Member
of the A.R.R.L. (for 38 years) as well as a LIFE member, also a member
of the Gulf States Hurricane Net on 3.935 MHz, and Gulf Coast Single
Side-Band Net 3.925 MHz. as well as a Member of the Delta Side-Band Net
3.905 MHz. and the 3.957 MHz. Group. I belong to the Baton Rouge Amateur
Radio Club, a Member of the W.C.L.A.R.C of Leesville and a Member of the
A.R.C.S in Many, La. I am also on D-STAR (48-B). We have a net on
Tuesday nights (7:30 local). Feel free to join us. Around 5:30 am you
most likely will find me on 3.957 Mhz. I’m usually there for about an
hour. We have a good group of very nice people on the frequency from
Louisiana, Texas, Alabama and Arkansas.
Now what?? by Joseph “Moe” Meaux
Keeping your ham radio and other equipment operational is extremely
important in a bug-out or portable situation. How long can your
equipment stay running in an emergency? Do you have a mobile unit
attached in your vehicle? How long can it run for if you run out of
fuel? If the electricity is not working because of a natural disaster,
how will you charge batteries? The one answer to this is Solar Power and
Storage. People have been talking about Solar Power for their houses and
businesses. Free energy from the sun that they can use, store, and even
sell back to the power companies. But most of these systems are
expensive, heavy, and stationary. Since Solar Panels came onto the
market about 1950, Eco-friendly people have been after them. Some states
even provide enough tax credit back to make the systems pay for
themselves with 5 or 6 years. Even our government is providing grants to
help pay for them. But they still have the problems with weight and
portability. Recently the thin-film flexible solar panel have come onto
the market. Now you can purchase a flexible, foldable panel that will
provide you the electricity you need to operate your equipment. The
price on these continue to go down, but for some they are still too
expensive. But they are cheaper than adding solar power to your house.
There is a YouTube channel by Julian OH8STN which deals with being
prepared for an emergency situation. It can be found at Survival Tech
North and does a good job of trying to explain what is needed for
emergencies. Being in Finland allows him to test equipment and
atmospheric conditions in some harsh weather. No one pays him to do it.
He tests what he buys. And what he makes. Julian packs his own equipment
in his backpack or on his sled to go out in the wild to work the bands.
Watching his videos and reading his blog teaches you a lot about
portable ham radio.
January 31 is the Deadline to Submit ARRL Foundation Scholarship
Applications from ARRL.org 12-28-2018 The ARRL Foundation Scholarship
program will accept applications from eligible applicants until January
31, 2019. All applicants must be FCC-licensed radio amateurs, and many
scholarships have other specific requirements, such as intended area of
study, ARRL Division, Section or state, and license class. Applicants
should review the scholarships and check off the ones for which they are
eligible. More information is on the ARRL Foundation Scholarship Program
page. This year, the Foundation Board of Directors is offering several
new scholarships. These include The Joel R. Miller (W7PDX) and Martha C.
Miller STEM Scholarship, The East Coast Amateur Radio Service (ECARS)
Scholarship, The Palomar Amateur Radio Club Scholarship, and The Dick
Warren, K6OBS, Memorial Scholarship
AARA Monday Night 2 Meter Net Rotation
http://www.w5ddl.org/clubsite/news/htm 35 Beginning January 1, 2018, the
net will not rotate between repeaters but the Net Controllers will
rotate each week and held on the 146.820 W5DDL repeater only. In case of
a repeater failure, the alternate receiver will be the W5EXI repeater.
The January 2019 schedule can be downloaded and printed in Adobe Acrobat
.PDF from the club website.
REGION 4 SKYWARN NET Each Tuesday night at 7:00 PM (local), the Region 4
SkyWarn Net will take place on the 145.370 SkyWarn repeater in
Lafayette. Net Control Operators will alternate each week. In case the
145.370 repeater fails, the net will be held on the 146.820 W5DDL
repeater PL Tone 103.5. The January 2019 schedule can be found at this
link: http://www.w5ddl.org/clubsite/news/htm When using the SkyWarn
145.370 repeater, be sure to use the receiver PL Tone for your area as
follows: NW Quadrant 114.8 – NE Quadrant 127.3 – SW Quadrant 141.3 – SE
Quadrant 94.8 – Central 103.5.
UPCOMING EVENTS 59th Acadiana Hamfest 2019 March 8th Friday & 9th
Saturday Rayne, LA
Pronto Pups – Corn Dogs 1 lb. Hot dogs 4 Cups Vegetable Oil ½ Cup
Flour ½ Cup Cornmeal 1 tsp. Baking Powder ½ tsp. Salt ½ tsp. Sugar 1
Tbs. cold Vegetable Shortening 1/3 Cup Milk 1 Egg 8 – 10 Wooden
Skewers Cornstarch for dusting Bring 3 cups of water to boiling in a
large saucepan. Add hot dogs and bring back to boiling. Remove from
heat; cover 20 minutes. Pour enough oil to a 2-inch depth in a skillet
and heat to 375°F or use your deep fryer. Combine flour, cornmeal,
baking powder, salt, and sugar in a medium-size bowl and blend with a
fork. Add shortening and cut-in with a fork until the size of small
peas. Combine milk and egg in a 1- cup measure. Stir into flour-cornmeal
mixture. Pour mixture into a tall glass. Remove hot dogs from water and
dry with paper towels. Insert skewer into the hot dog, and be sure to
leave a “handle”. Dust hot dog in cornstarch and dip hot dog into
batter; let excess batter drip into glass. Drop into hot fat and fry for
2 minutes, or until golden brown. Fry only two at a time. Serve with
yellow, prepared mustard.
Clubs and/or individuals who would like to see something published in
the Section Managers Newsletter please send me your
announcements/articles ASAP.
UPCOMING HAMFESTS:
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
03/08/2019 | Louisiana State Convention, 59th Acadiana Hamfest
Location: Rayne, LA
Sponsor: Acadiana Amateur Radio Association, Inc.
HAMFEST/CONVENTION
11/02/2019 | Greater New Orleans Ham Fest
Location: Harahan, LA
Sponsor: Crescent City Amateur Radio Group
ARRL LOUISIANA SECTION IS ON SOCIAL MEDIA:
@ARRLLASection    TWITTER
Arrllouisianasection    INSTAGRAM
Please come join us at 1 or more sites…….
Please remember if you want to see your club’s activities or any news
of interest please feel free to email me and I will get it in the next
newsletter……
73!
——————————————————————–
ARRL Louisiana Section
Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR
——————————————————————–

LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER DECEMBER 2018

Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter December 2018
I am hoping that each of you had a very Merry Christmas and will have a
very Happy New Year in 2019.
Silent Keys
Cecil Harper WR5Y(W5CQG)
Frank Dahlberg KA5AHK
Ronald Matherne KB5BB
Joseph Hains W5BMN
Brent Austin WD5BUC
Paul Partin WX5C
Fonda Hatfield KA5FOG
Gerarl Valure WB5VWN
New Hams
Ted F Vander Wiede, AG5SC
Nicholas W Simoneaux, KI5CHQ
David R Grim, KI5CHZ
Steven D Brinkley, KI5CGQ
Lance A Lobell, KI5CDR
Michael L Freyder, KI5CDK
William Craft, KI5CJS
Paula R Hidalgo, KI5CDJ
Isabella M Dugas, KI5CKA
Lyle P Guidry, KI5CEE
Jason A Williamson, KI5CDO
John Lundberg, KI5CHR
Jo’vante L Hills, KI5CLP
Claude B Petersen, KI5CDM
Brian A Moser, KI5CDN
Carter N Lang, KI5CKK
Makayla J Lister, KI5CKN
Justin C Lewis, KI5CKH
Edwin J Rivers, KI5CKO
Quentin M Spruill, KI5CKR
Denise Cavin, KI5CKL
Justin A Contreras, KI5CKQ
Brittany R Powell, KI5CKT
Michael C Kendrick, KI5CKM
William H Robertson, KI5CKP
Doyle R Grant, KI5CKI
Logan J English, KI5CKS
Edward D Butler, KI5CJU
License Upgrades
Robert A Branicky, KG5TGF
Edward A Hemard, KF5YCW
Elisha B Wilson, KI5ADM
New/Renewed ARRL Members
Edgar Womack
Steven R Powell, KG6IPI
Henry Muller, KG5FRI
Barbara J Muller, KG5IDB
George O Broussard, KA5HCO
Richard T Colburn, K7RTC
Josef L Hope, KF5YFC
Charles M Clark, W5SBU
Edward S Warren, AE5VC
Douglas J Aymond, KG5VYA
William W Barrett, WW5MB
Kenneth A Johnson, K5KAJ
Jerry W Darnell, AD5AQ
Daniel D Hoover, KF5IVT
Caroline B Ansley, KB5OBC
Thomas D McDaniel, KE5YXU
FROM THE ARRL
ARRL Petitions FCC to Incorporate Parity Act Provisions into its Amateur
Radio Rules
12/19/2018
The ARRL has filed a Petition for Rulemaking (PRM) asking the FCC to
amend its Part 97 Amateur Service rules to incorporate the provisions of
the Amateur Radio Parity Act. The Petition has not yet been assigned a
rule making (RM) number and is not yet open for public comment. In the
past, the FCC has said that it would not take such action without
guidance from the US Congress, but, as ARRL’s Petitionnotes, the
Congress “has overwhelmingly and consistently” offered bipartisan
support for the Amateur Radio Parity Act.
“Private land use regulations which either prohibit or which do not
accommodate the installation and maintenance of an effective outdoor
antenna in residences of Amateur Service licensees are unquestionably
the most significant and damaging impediments to Amateur Radio Service
communications that exist now,” ARRL said in its Petition. “They are
already precluding opportunities for young people to become active in
the avocation and to conduct technical self-training and participate in
STEM [science, technology, engineering, and mathematics] learning
activities inherent in an active, experiential learning environment.
Without the relief in this Petition, the future of Amateur Radio is
bleak indeed.” The proposed amendments would have no effect on the
FCC’s limited preemption policy in §97.15(b), which pertains to state
and municipal governing bodies, ARRL said.
Specifically, ARRL is proposing that the FCC amend Part 97 by adding a
new subsection under §97.15, that prohibits and ceases the enforcement
of, “Any private land use restriction, including restrictive covenants
and regulations imposed by a community association,” that either fails
to permit a licensee to install and maintain an effective outdoor
antenna capable of operation on all Amateur Radio frequency bands, on
property under the exclusive use or control of the licensee; precludes
or fails to permit Amateur Service communications, or which does not
constitute the minimum practicable restriction on such communications to
accomplish the lawful purposes specifically articulated in the
declaration of covenants of a community association seeking to enforce
such restriction. ARRL’s proposed rule would not affect any existing
antenna approved or installed before the effective date of a Report and
Order resulting from ARRL’s petition.
The proposed provisions reflect the accommodation reached in the
ultimate version of the Parity Act bill at the urging of federal
lawmakers between ARRL and the Community Associations Institute (CAI),
the only organization representing homeowners’ associations. “That
legislation was passed unanimously by the House of Representatives four
separate times and has the support of the Senate Commerce Committee and
the current Administration,” ARRL stressed.
“Private land use regulations are not ‘contracts’ in the sense
that there is any meeting of the minds between the buyer and seller of
land,” ARRL said. “Rather, they are simply restrictions on the use
of owned land, imposed by the developer of a subdivision by recordation
in the land records of the jurisdiction when it is first created. They
bind all lots in the subdivision. If an Amateur Radio licensee wants to
buy a home in a subdivision burdened by deed restrictions, that licensee
has precisely two options: Buy the residence subject to the
restrictions, or do not buy the residence. There is no negotiation
possible because the restrictions are already in place and cannot be
waived by a seller in favor of a buyer.”
ARRL noted in its Petition that an increasing number of homes available
for purchase today are already subject to restrictive covenants
prohibiting outdoor antennas, and that the Community Associations
Institute data show that 90% of new housing starts in the US are subject
to deed restrictions and other limitation that make installation of
outdoor Amateur Radio antennas ineffective or impossible.
Also, ARRL pointed out that the Telecommunications Act of 1996 gives the
FCC jurisdiction “to preempt private land use regulations that
conflict with federal policy and that private land use regulations are
entitled to less deference than municipal regulations, because the
former are premised solely on aesthetic considerations rather than
safety issues, whereas municipal regulations are concerned with
both.”
“It is now time for actual and functional parity in the Commissions
regulations in order to protect the strong federal interest in Amateur
Radio communications,” ARRL said.
Countdown to Third Annual AM Rally Has Begun
12/18/2018
The third annual AM Rally is on the near horizon — just about 6 weeks
away — getting under way at 0000 UTC on February 2 and continuing
until 0700 UTC on February 4. The event aims to encourage the use of AM
on 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, and 6 meters while highlighting the various
types of AM equipment in use today. The event is open to any and all
radio amateurs running AM using any type of radio equipment — modern,
vintage, tube, solid-state, software-defined, military, boat anchor,
broadcast, homebrew, or commercial.
“We’re very excited about the upcoming AM Rally in February, given
its growth over the past 2 years and the positive comments we’ve
received,” said Clark Burgard, N1BCG, who is spearheading the event
with Steve Cloutier, WA1QIX, and Brian Kress, KB3WFV. “In particular,
it’s great to hear how so many ops are giving this classic mode a try,
many for the first time, and of the help offered to them by those who
have mastered the technology.”
For many, if not most, radio amateurs getting on AM is as simple as
pressing the AM mode button on the front panel. Numerous transceivers in
use today offer AM capability. A lot of hams enjoy restoring and using
vintage Amateur Radio equipment, which typically means a separate
transmitter and receiver. Until SSB subsumed it on the ham bands, AM was
the primary HF voice mode. The change to SSB did not happen without some
pushback, however.
Today, a group of dedicated radio amateurs keeps the flame alive,
getting on AM frequently, and for many of them, AM is their primary
operating mode. The AM Rally gives the uninitiated a chance to dip a toe
into the pool, so to speak.
The event website has complete AM Rally details, contact information,
award categories, logging, and tips on how to get the most out of your
station equipment in AM mode. Contact Burgard for more information.
The event is sponsored by Radio Engineering Associates (REA), in
cooperation with ARRL, which supports all modes of Amateur Radio
operation. W1AW will play a leading role in the event, as it has for the
past two years.
Certificates will be awarded to stations scoring the highest number of
points in each of the five power classes, regardless of rig category,
both for most contacts and most states/provinces.
“All it takes is a turn, push, or click to participate!” Burgard
said. There’s also plenty of time to dig out and dust off that old
AM-capable tube gear sitting in your attic or basement.
New Amateur Radio Packet Gear Awaits Unpacking, Installation on Space
Station
12/18/2018
New Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) packet
equipment awaits unpacking and installation on board the station after
arriving in November as part of the cargo transported via a Russian 71P
Progress resupply vehicle. The new packet module for NA1SS will replace
the current packet gear, which has been intermittent over the past
year.
“With the arrival of Progress complete, the crew has to find free time
unpack Progress, uninstall the intermittent module, and then set up and
test the replacement packet module,” explained Dan Barstow, KA1ARD,
senior education manager of the ISS National Laboratory (CASIS), an
ARISS sponsor.
The ISS packet system was reported to have gone down in July 2017,
although it unexpectedly came back to life the following summer. At the
time of the failure, NASA ISS Ham Radio Project Engineer Kenneth Ransom,
N5VHO, said the revived system would fill the gap until the replacement
packet module was launched and installed. The packet system operates on
145.825 MHz. ARISS hardware team members on the ground were able to
locate a functional duplicate of the ISS packet module that has been in
use on the ISS for 17 years. ARISS said the subsequent installation will
depend on the crew’s busy schedule.
In an email to ARISS and other groups CASIS supports, Barstow pointed
out that ARISS is an official back-up system for astronauts to talk with
Mission Control in the unlikely failure of the station’s primary
communication systems.
Bartow said that in 2017, hams relayed nearly 89,000 packet messages via
the ISS — an average of 243 every day. The statistic so intrigued and
amazed Barstow that he decided to get his Amateur Radio license and gear
to join in the activity.
Satellite stalwart and ARISS supporter Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK, won the
December 2018 QST Cover Plaque Award for his article, “Making Digital
Contacts through the ISS.”
Current International Space Station (ISS) crew members Serena
Auñón-Chancellor, KG5TMT, Alexander Gerst, KF5ONO, and cosmonaut
Sergey Prokopyev are scheduled to return to Earth on December 20 on a
Soyuz vehicle.
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Registration is Open for QRP-ARCI Four Days in May 2019
12/17/2018
Registration now is open for the QRP Amateur Radio Club International
“Four Days in May” (FDIM), Thursday – Sunday, May 16 – 19, at
the Holiday Inn, Fairborn, Ohio. The annual FDIM event for QRP
enthusiasts and builders takes place in conjunction with Hamvention®.
Registration begins the evening of Wednesday, May 15.
Most of Thursday will be taken up with seminars, “meet the speakers”
opportunities, and an open room for casual show and tell. Most of Friday
and Saturday are open to attend the Hamvention and visit the QRP-ARCI
Toy Store.
Friday evening activities typically include “show and tell,” vendor
displays, and a homebrew contest. Saturday evening features social
activities and a banquet, while Sunday is open for Hamvention. Attendees
are invited to display their QRP-related projects at FDIM. One evening
will feature vendors offering QRP-related products, with some offering
FDIM discounts. Dress is casual for all events.
Reservations and special room rates for FDIM will be available after
January 1 through the QRP-ARCI website. For more information, contact
FDIM 2019 Chair Norm Schklar, WA4ZXV.
Registration Opens for 2019 ConTest University in Dayton
12/16/2018
Registration now is open for 2019 ConTest University (CTU), Thursday,
May 16, 2019, at the Crowne Plaza in downtown Dayton, Ohio. This is the
day before Hamvention® opens in Xenia.
More than 7,500 students have attended CTU sessions over the last 13
years in eight countries, and more than 100 CTU professors have shared
their contesting experiences. The faculty lineup, posted on the CTU
website, includes several new and returning members. Newcomer Bryant,
KG5HVO, will present ideas for attracting youth into contesting, while
Dan, N6MJ, and Chris, KL9A — the gold medalists at WRTC 2014 — will
present advanced operating papers.
Not teaching but on hand to field questions will be CTU stalwart Frank,
W3LPL. The 2019 CTU Dayton course outline will be posted soon.
Scholarships (paid registration) are available for CTU attendees through
a grant from the Northern California DX Foundation (NCDXF) for students
age 25 and younger. Click the “Contact Us” tab on the CTU website.
CTU Dayton 2019 registration information is on the CTU website.
Prospective attendees who have given or will give a talk about Amateur
Radio to any club, hamfest, or other group since May 16, 2018, qualify
for a $10 registration discount. Choose the “Registration with Club
Talk Discount” option.
First FT8 Roundup is a Huge Hit
12/13/2018
The first FT8 Roundup over the December 1 – 2 weekend attracted some
1,300 logs from those taking advantage of the ever-more-popular digital
protocol. This, despite its having been announced on fairly short notice
and with other contests such as the ARRL 160-Meter Contest under way on
the same weekend. More than 400 logs were from US radio amateurs in the
48 contiguous states, plus the District of Columbia. Overall, some
131,200 contacts were recorded. Participants from 91 countries submitted
logs, testifying to the fact that FT8 is not just an US phenomenon.
“The FT8 Roundup was the last shakedown for the WSJT-X 2.0-rc5 beta
software,” said well-known RTTY contesting enthusiast and expert Don
Hill, AA5AU, an FT8 Roundup cosponsor with Ed Muns, W0YK. “It
performed with no major complications.” The general availability
release of WSJT-X 2.0 is now out, and it’s not backward compatible
with WSJT-X 1.9 or earlier versions. Developer Joe Taylor, K1JT, has
urged users to upgrade by January 1 to what now is new world standard.
Muns, who’s NCJ “Digital Contesting” contributing editor, said FT8
Roundup participation compared favorably with that for the ARRL RTTY
Roundup, which has averaged around 1,700 logs in recent years.
“Don and I expected the contest to be popular,” Muns said, “but
the participation far exceeded our expectations. I think it bodes well
for future FT8 contesting. Don and I are pretty bullish about continuing
the FT8 Roundup on the first full weekend of December each year.”
Nonetheless, Muns said he doesn’t believe FT8 will “really take
off” and displace RTTY until the contact rate can be significantly
increased through parallel QSO techniques.
Hill agreed on the event’s popularity. “I have to say it was a huge
success,” he said. “Ed and I never dreamed it would be this popular.
It didn’t make sense to continue the Ten-Meter RTTY Contest during
this part of the sunspot cycle. Replacing it with an all-FT8 HF contest
was the logical choice.” Hill and Muns also co-sponsor the Ten-Meter
RTTY Contest.
Hill told ARRL that final results of the inaugural FT8 Roundup should be
out in a few days. “After the New Year, we hope to have downloadable
online certificates available to all participants. We will definitely do
it again next year,” he said.
The 2019 ARRL RTTY Roundup will permit the use of FT8.
Apollo 8 50th Anniversary Special Event Set for December 21 – 27
12/11/2018
Several NASA Amateur Radio clubs will mark the 50th anniversary of
Apollo 8 on December 21 – 27, concluding the year-long NASA on the Air
activity, which celebrates NASA’s 60th anniversary. The agency was
created in 1958 through an act signed by President Dwight Eisenhower.
Apollo 8 was launched on December 21, 1968, and splashed down 6 days
later on December 27. It was the first manned spacecraft to leave
low-Earth orbit, orbit the moon, and return safely.
Special event operation will be on various bands and modes, and
participating stations will self-spot on the DX cluster as well as via
Facebook and Twitter.
Contact Rob Suggs, KB5EZ, at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center for
more information.
Hamvention® Seeks 2019 Award Nominees
12/11/2018
Hamvention® is soliciting nominees for its 2019 awards — Amateur of
the Year, Technical Achievement, Special Achievement, Club of the Year.
Since the inception of the Hamvention awards program in 1955, many radio
amateur have been honored for their dedication and selfless
contributions to Amateur Radio and to society.
•    The Amateur of the Year Award recognizes a radio amateur who
demonstrates a long-term commitment to the advancement of Amateur Radio,
a history of contributions to ham radio, and a dedication to service and
professionalism.
•    The Technical Achievement Award honors a radio amateur who has
achieved technical excellence in the world of Amateur Radio through
inventions, processes, discoveries, experiments, and technical
accomplishments, or through other outstanding technical achievement that
has contributed to Amateur Radio.
•    The Special Achievement Award goes to a radio amateur who has made
an outstanding contribution to the advancement of the radio art and/or
science. This award typically recognizes a radio amateur who has
spearheaded a single significant project.
•    The Club of the Year will be honored for clearly demonstrating its
involvement in varied aspects of Amateur Radio for the greater good of
their community or the nation.
Nomination forms for each award are available online and should include
the information requested. There are separate forms to nominate
individuals and to nominate a club. The individual(s) making the
nomination should provide contact information in case questions arise.
Submit nominations via email or via USPS mail to Hamvention Awards
Committee, Box 964, Dayton, OH 45401-0964.
The nomination deadline is February 15. The Awards Committee will
announce the award recipient after reviewing the nominations. An honors
convocation will be held on the Saturday evening of Hamvention weekend,
and presentations to award winners will take place on Sunday afternoon,
prior to the door prize awards.Contactthe Awards Committee for more
information. — Thanks to Mike Kalter, W8CI, and Frank J. Beafore, WS8B
News from the ARRL Contest Branch
12/10/2018
The ARRL Contest Branch reports that preliminary results now are
available for the 2018 ARRL November Sweepstakes CW and for the 2018
September VHF Contest. Preliminary results for the ARRL 10 GHz and Up
Contest also have been posted. The Contest Branch reminds participants
that logs for the 2018 ARRL 10-Meter Contest are due by 2359 UTC on
December 16, and the 2018 ARRL EME Contest logs are due by 2359 UTC on
December 25.
WSJT-X 2.0 Full Release Now Available; FT8 Enthusiasts Urged to Upgrade
Now
12/10/2018
The WSJT-X 2.0 software suite has been released, and developer Joe
Taylor, K1JT, is urging FT8 and MSK144 users to upgrade to what will
become the new standard, because the FT8 and MSK144 protocols have been
enhanced in a way that is notbackward compatible with older versions of
the program. That includes any version 1.9 releases.
“The new protocols become the worldwide standards starting on December
10, 2018, and all users should upgrade to WSJT-X 2.0 by January 1,
2019,” Taylor said on the WSJT-X home page. “After that date, only
the new FT8 and MSK144 should be used on the air.”
Users are encouraged to read the new Quick Start Guide for WSJT-X. Gary
Hinson, ZL2IFB, has released an FT8 Operating Guide.
2018 ARRL International Grid Chase Certificates Page Now Live
12/05/2018
The ARRL International Grid Chase Certificates page is now live. As IGC
competitions are monthly, people can start generating monthly
certificates to display. At year’s end, IGC will have the option to
generate a certificate based on year-end tallies. For now, participants
can select a month, then select up to 16 band/mode certificates they’d
like to create. Participants with more than 16 band/mode activities can
choose to generate two certificates to encompass the excess (i.e., more
than 16 lines), or can just generate certain band certificates, or just
certain mode certificates — even just one band/mode if desired. This
is a work in progress, but give it a try! Feedback is welcome.
JOTA Reports 36% Growth in Scout Participation
11/30/2018
Scouting’s Jamboree on the Air (JOTA) 2018 reports that total Scout
participation in the annual fall event jumped by 36% from 2017. Each
year more than 1 million Scouts and Guides get together over the
airwaves for JOTA, which takes place on the third weekend of October.
Since the first JOTA in 1958, millions of Scouts have become acquainted
via Amateur Radio, and contacts sometimes result in relationships that
extend for many years.
This year, 10,703 Scouts took part in the event, compared with 7,872
last year. Participating Amateur Radio operators topped 1,000 for the
first time since 2016. At 610, the number of registered JOTA locations
was way up, as was the number of JOTA stations registered, with 314.
Participating JOTA stations reported contacts with stations in 99
countries, also up over 2017.
JOTA Coordinator Jim Wilson, K5ND, said he was pleased with this
year’s numbers and hopes that 2019’s event will show a continued
increase, despite a lack of sunspots.
“Looking over the numbers, a big part of the increase in JOTA Scout
participation came from the World JOTA-JOTI (Jamboree on the Internet)
Team’s registration and reporting system,” Wilson told ARRL. “We
had 233 stations report results on the US system, which is comparable to
last year’s 226. In addition to that, 90 stations reported their
results on the World system. After eliminating duplicates, this added 33
to our total of 266 station reports. That, chiefly, accounts for the
increase in total Scout participation. In summary, perhaps this nice
increase is due primarily to more accurate reporting.”
Wilson said he’s also looking forward to the final tally on US
participation in JOTI. “Location registration in the US jumped from
274 last year to 610 this year,” he said. “Several Amateur Radio
operations reported using JOTI chat and Skype to greatly improve their
ability to generate Scout-to-Scout conversations between the US and the
rest of the world. Of course, VoIP modes like D-Star, DMR, and EchoLink
also helped in our solar minimum.”
World JOTA-JOTI numbers are not expected until early 2019, as each
country reports its results by mid-December followed by number crunching
and compiling of the report, Wilson explained.
“Thanks to everyone who set up a JOTA station and helped Scouts
experience the technology, fun, and magic of Amateur Radio. Let’s do
it again next year,” he concluded.
FROM AROUND THE LA SECTION
Region 1:
While attending the Greater New Orleans Hamfest in November I was
honored to be able to go over to the Jefferson Amateur Radio Club’s
(JARC) Clubhouse and make a presentation for their renewed Special
Service Club award.  I was treated to a tour of the clubhouse and was
able to meet some very nice members who made me feel very welcome.
Attending the presentation that day was:
Chuck Sanders  NO5W, Secretary
Mike Coulter  K5DKQ, Vice President
Chris Miltenberger  W5CMM, President
Don Olson  WA5W, Treasurer
and their youngest club member 10 year old David Karcher KG5DRK with his
Dad Brian KG5GJT.
Thanks again JARC members and I look forward to seeing you guys again
soon!
Region 4:
ACADIANA AMATEUR RADIO ASSOCIATION NEWSLETTER
Local 2-Meter Nets Monday AARA Monday Night Net 7:00 PM 146.820 PL 103.5
Lafayette, LA
Tuesday Region 4 SkyWarn Net 7:00 PM 145.370 – PL 103.5 Lafayette, LA
Wednesday Silent Key Memorial Net 6:30 PM 145.410 No PL New Iberia, LA
Thursday Youth Net 7:00 PM 146.820 – PL 103.5 Lafayette, LA EchoLink
Node: 370324
How to Send E-mail to a Disaster Area via WINLINK
There’s a common misconception that one has to have complicated
equipment, software and skills to leverage the ham radio-developed
WINLINK system to reach into disaster areas. In fact, one of the major
advantages of the system is that it can easily connect disaster
area-located volunteers (who must use radio to make any connection) with
anyone else in the state, nation or world. It provides an easy way for
“back-home” supporters, family and friends to keep in touch with
deployed volunteers. First you have to know the correct email Winlink
address of the disaster-located ham: it is simply their callsign (e.g.,
K4AAA) @winlink.org thus K4AAA@winlink.org Second, because WINLINK was
built to handle slow-speed radio connections, receiving a load of spam
would be catastrophic for throughput over a slow modem protocol. To
avoid this, WINLINK developers put in a “white list” — a list for each
WINLINK email user of who is allowed to send them email. While the
WINLINK user can simply add you to their email-okay list, there’s an
even simpler way for support amateurs to bypass this, which will not be
known by spammers — just put //WL2K at the beginning of your subject
line. For example, like this: //WL2K What is your current Status? With
those two critical components of the Winlink email message format,
anyone with normal email can make needed communications to a deployed
volunteer who is participating in the WINLINK system. One caveat:
WINLINK can’t “force” email onto a volunteer who doesn’t have their
radio turned on, or isn’t connecting into a Winlink server station, so
it depends on periodic check-ins by the participant to check for,
receive and send email by radio. Approximately 50,000 messages per month
are transacted by this system, so it is in regular substantial usage.
WINLINK email-users can also add entire domains to their “white list”
(e.g., arrl.org, arrl.net, em.myflorida.com and state.fl.us ) — which
might be a useful thing to do for those who are going to be deployed and
will be in contact with officials or managers. — — Gordon Gibby, KX4Z,
North Florida Amateur Radio Club Reprinted from “The ARES E-Letter for
November 21, 2018″.
A message from our AARA President Chris Ancelet N5MCY: There aren’t
many places around the world where men and women, whom we have never
met, choose to fight with their lives, to grant each one of us the
rights that not everyone else has. There aren’t many of those places
where these same men and women ask for nothing in return. There is no
institution in this world that commands such unwavering respect as our
United States Military. This is why it was such an honor for the members
of the Acadiana Amateur Radio Association to partake in the 1st annual
Southwest Louisiana War Veterans Home Special Event on November 10,
2018. Our event kicked off on a chilly Saturday morning at my residence
in Egan, where Tom Dischler (W5OHJ) and I loaded out AMOS II and the
antenna trailer. Tom and I made the short drive to Jennings and
immediately began setting up. We were met shortly thereafter by the
following club members: · Barrett Oge (KG5SSO) · Steve Webre (AF5VR)
· Danny and Kathy Daigle (KD5JSM & KD5TJZ) · David Forrest (KG5SBA)
from the neighboring Lake Charles Club · Glen Thibodeaux (KF5FNP) Once
we were set up, we had a brief meeting with the staff and we were
concerned that the cooler weather would hamper our outcome. We made
arrangements inside of AMOS II to accommodate anyone, even wheelchair
bound, inside of the communications trailer. This would get our veterans
out of the wind where they could sit and enjoy the event. We quickly
began making contacts on 20m as band conditions, overall, we not too
bad. We were able to log over 120 contacts and had a great time on the
radio. As contacts were made, I couldn’t help but notice that the
veterans began to pick up on some of the distances that we were making
contacts to and were amazed that we were even talking to folks as far as
Canada. You could see the excitement in their faces and some of them
began to recollect some of the radio equipment that they personally used
in the Korean and Vietnam war. It was great to be able to listen to
their stories and share in this experience. Another great take away from
today was the number of stations that commended us on hosting this
event. Many of them mentioned that they too had a War Veterans’ home
in their state and they were going to look into hosting events just like
this in the future. I am hopeful that this special event will gain
national notoriety and we have more amateur radio clubs from around the
United States participate in this event. In closing, I would like to
thank the staff of the Southwest Louisiana War Veterans Home for
allowing us to share in the many events of this weekend. For me, I would
have been perfectly content with only making one contact for the entire
event. Just the time spent listening to the stories from these wonderful
elders was satisfaction enough and very humbling to say the least. We
look forward to sponsoring another event here in the future and hope
that you will join us in recognizing such a great group of American
Patriots. We owe our Veterans a debt we can never fully repay.
Sincerely, Chris Ancelet (N5MCY)
UPCOMING BIRTHDAYS:
12/03 KG5PUL CAINE
12/09 NA5Q ROLAND
12/11 KG5QKH RAY
12/16 K2JDM MOE
12/22 KD6VPC GERARD
01/01 K5QXJ NICK
01/03 KE5UPM AL
01/05 W5AG ARCHIE
01/05 AB5GI ERICK
01/06 N5KNY PAUL
REGION 4 SKYWARN NET
Each Tuesday night at 7:00 PM (local), the Region 4 SkyWarn
Net will take place on the 145.370 SkyWarn repeater in Lafayette. Net
Control Operators will alternate each week.
In case the 145.370 repeater fails, the net will
be held on the 146.820 W5DDL repeater PL Tone 103.5.
The December schedule can be found at this link:
When using the SkyWarn 145.370 repeater, be sure to use the receiver
PL Tone for your area as follows:
NW Quadrant 114.8 – NE Quadrant 127.3 – SW Quadrant 141.3 – SE Quadrant
94.8 – Central 103.5
Turkey Pot Pie
A simple recipe to make with those leftovers.
2 cans Cream of Chicken Soup 1 can chicken broth
1 can Cream of Mushroom Soup 1 bag frozen mixed vegetable
4 cups cut-up cooked Turkey 2 Cups Bisquick mix
1 ½ Cup milk
1-Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray Pam into 9-X-13 inch pan.
2- In 4-qt pot, heat soups, turkey, and vegetables to boiling,
stirring constantly. Boil for 1 minute. Add to pan.
3- In a medium bowl, stir the remaining ingredients together
until blended. Pour evenly over soup mixture. Crust will rise
during cooking.
4-Bake about 30 minutes, or until crust is golden brown.
Try a variety of mixed vegetables and condensed cream soups,
depending on your taste and what you have on hand.
Region 8:
Submitted by Joe Holland KB5VJY LA Section PIC
NELARC and West Monroe High School are Training Hams
West Monroe, La-  A group of amateur radio operators, led by Jim
Ragsdale W5LA, were looking for ways to grow the amateur community.
Knowing that they needed younger people in amateur radio, they contacted
the STEM teacher, Denise Cavin, who invited them to come do a
presentation.  Other locations were also contacted included the Geneva
Academy, a private school, and ULM.
        A group of 14 kids were interested and they entertained the idea
of having a Technician Class training session, so on November 17th, 14
kids from the three schools gathered at the West Monroe High School on a
Saturday morning and the rest was history. 10 New Technicians were
tested and passed.
      The new hams are eager to get on the air, each of them has a HT
and they are expecting to be on the air soon!!  They are kicking around
starting an informal newcomers net!… Thanks to W5LA and his crew, and
Welcome to our new hams! KI5CKH JUSTIN, KI5CKJ TRINITY, KI5CKL DENISE,
KI5CKM MICHAEL, KI5CKN MAKAYLA, KI5CKO EDWIN, KI5CKP WILLIAM,
KI5CKQ JUSTIN, KI5CKR QUENTIN, KI5CKT BRITTANY.
Region 9:
The SELARC “Hamster”
*Serving Amateur Radio Since 1974*
Published Monthly by the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club Inc.
P.O. Box 1324, Hammond LA 70404
Visit our website: www.selarc.org
Vol. 45, No. 12 ………………………….. December 2018
SELARC 2019 Hamfest
As a reminder, The SELARC Hamfest on January 19, 2019, in Hammond is
less than 6 weeks away, and the club is still in need of many more
ticket sales and necessary members or other volunteers to help work the
event.
The 4 main prizes for tickets also listed on the SELARC Hamfest page –
main prize winners do not need to be present at the drawing and if a
non-ham wins can receive the cash value equivalent in place of item,
prizes include:
1st Prize: Yaesu FT-891 HF Transceiver – HF and 6 Meters, All-mode
Transceiver, 100W (25W AM)
2nd Prize: Rig Expert AA-230 – Zoom Antenna Analyzer
3rd Prize: Heil Sound Pro Set – Elite 6 Headset
4th Prize: Yaesu FT-60 Dual Band Handheld
For any questions about the drawing or more information needed to help
sell tickets, please e-mail wb5net@arrl.net
Happy Birthday!!
Birthday Wishes in December go out to – Larry KJ6SET, Elizabeth KM6MWZ,
Richard KG5BA, and Carol KE5GOC.
VE Session Results –
Congratulations to the following new HAM from the November 25 VE
Session!
General: Paul Mobley – Gonzales, La.
Many thanks to the VEs’ who attend the Hammond VE Group exam sessions
every month! Without your support, we couldn’t continue giving back to
Amateur Radio!!
Hope to see you at the December session and again at the Hammond Hamfest
on 19 Jan, 2019!!
It has been a few years since SELARC was a Special Services Club. We
attain this status through the ARRL for maintaining a certain percentage
of SELARC members as as ARRL members, so….membership in ARRL gives
SELARC additional benefits and responsibilities, like appointing QSL
Card Checkers for WAS and WAC awards. you can check out the following
ARRL link for more details at:
If you haven’t joined the ARRL, please consider doing so. It benefits
the club and also gives us a voice with the ARRL as our lobbying body
for Amateur Radio issues in the political arenas!! You can join online,
by mail, or even through SELARC by submitting an ARRL new or renewal
membership application with your SELARC renewal also. By doing this,
SELARC may retain a portion of the ARRL membership fee!
Don’t forget, SELARC membership dues renewals, start on 1st of January
and are in effect until 31st of March of each year, at which time, you
are dropped from the roster!
You can download the membership application from our club webpage and
mail it in or bring it to any club meeting or function! We ask that you
submit a form each year with any changes to phone, email and physical
address so that we can reach you when needed! We also have applications
at all meeting and functions!
——————————————————————————————————————————————
ARES
LA Section ARES Report November 2018
364 Members
35 Active Nets, 1 with NTS Liaison
#Exercises/Training:  25 for 216 hours
#Public Service Events: 4 for 264 hours
#Skywarn Events: 3 for 24 hours
Total:  32 Events for 504 hours
Report by Jim Coleman, AI5B
LA Section Emergency Coordinator
***The Louisiana Section is undergoing the sign-up period and initial
roll-out of ARES CONNECT currently.  ARES members please be watching
your emails for additional information as it becomes available. ARES
CONNECT is scheduled to go online for all sections January 1, 2019.
——————————————————————————————————————————————
LA Section Traffic Manager’s Report
SESSIONS  QNI. QtC. QTR
16.                115  30    120
73,
Jimmy Lewis/AB5YS
Louisiana Section Traffic Manager
——————————————————————————————————————————————
UPCOMING HAMFESTS:
01/19/2019 | 38th SELARC Hammond HamFest
Location: Hammond, LA
Type: ARRL Hamfest
Sponsor: Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club
MILITARY NEWS:
Please keep Benjamin Holland, son of Joe (KB5VJY) and Meri Holland in
your prayers. Ben joined the U.S. Air Force this month and has begun
basic training in Texas.  Thank You Ben, for your willingness to serve
our country.
——————————————————————————————————————————–
REMINDER:
Deadline for nominations for 2018 Louisiana Section Amateur of the Year
AND 2018 Delta Division Amateur of the Year is December 31, 2018.
Please email me to request the nomination form(s) and instructions and
tell me which award you are sending for……they must be back to me no
later than December 31st……
———————————————————————————————–
I want to take this time to thank everyone for all the support and words
of encouragement that I have received since my appointment as Section
Manager in April.  It has truly been my pleasure to serve each of you to
the best of my abilities. As a Section, we are really doing very well.
My recent trip to ARRL HQ for the “New” Section Managers meeting
revealed that to me.  We continue to receive tremendous support from our
Delta Division leaders like David Norris, K5UZ (Director), Ed Hudgens
WB4RHQ (Vice Director), Keith Barnes W5KB (Assist. Director) and Gary
Stratton K5GLS (Assist. Director).  I hope  each of you had a very Merry
Christmas and will have a Happy New Year and hope to see many of you at
2019’s first Hamfest in Hammond on January 19th.
——————————————————————–
ARRL Louisiana Section
Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR

LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER NOVEMBER 2018

  • LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER NOVEMBER 2018
    SILENT KEYS
    Norbet Newby WA5CFW
    Elizabeth Denton KA5MTG
    Charles Winder, Jr. K5FNN
    Frank Thrash W4DLZ
    Henry P. Forbes KC5KJ
    Sam L. Richardson W5SMH
    Carl Beck W5BEK
    NEW HAMS
    Report for 2018-11-02
    Jared A Mayeaux, KI5BVA
    Donnis H O’bryan, KI5CBV
    Ronald D Porter, AG5RW
    T J Taplin, KI5CBW
    Rex A Schuttler, KI5BUE
    LICENSE UPGRADES
    Report for 2018-11-02
    Camille J Guidry, KG5SWD
    David J Cantrelle, KF5WMS
    Michael J Decossas, KB5OZE
    Gregory Speyrer, KE5DEU
    Michael A Carmouche, KG5TGG
    Dorothy L Minor, KF5YNM
    Richard L Cutrer, KF5TQT
    Shirley M Jordan, KI5BFH
    Patrick L Widner, KG5AAH
    NEW ARRL MEMBERS
    Report for 2018-11-02
    James P Marra, N5HZ
    Divini Luccioni, N3DI
    Ted F Vander Wiede, KB1NDX
    Nathan A Cooper, K5ZFC
    Steven D Brinkley
    William J O Donnell, W5VPM
    Susan Anderson, KE5FMX
    Timothy Sonnier, N5RKK
    Abbigail Wilson, KF5BEW
    Kendra Wilson, KF5FYS
    Galen D Wilson, KF5BET
    John B Maylard, KC6MNO
    David W Ables, KE5NIJ
    Kevin J Abshire, KE5RKT
    Paul J Maia, KB5AIF
    Leonard W Martin, WD5DNQ
    Keith A McDavid, KF5WTK
    Kevin N Boykin, N5CDB
    Ronald D Porter, AG5RW
    Terry J Peek, KD5BIO
    Charles H Edwards, WC5K
    Jeffrey W Hall, KA5YZQ
    ——————————————————————————————————————————————
    FROM THE ARRL
    Well-Known Contester, “Antenna Farmer” Paul Bittner, W0AIH, SK
    11/01/2018
    The Reverend Paul Bittner, W0AIH, of Fall Creek, Wisconsin, died doing
    what he loved on October 31, when a tower-climbing mishap claimed his
    life at his well-known antenna farm. The ARRL Life Member and Maxim
    Society member was 84. A member of the CQ Contesting Hall of Fame and
    retired Lutheran pastor, Bittner was a well-known and respected figure
    within the Amateur Radio community and a prolific contester and DXer.
    His call sign was nearly always present in most major operating events,
    and even in a few lesser-known contests, and news of his tragic death
    and condolences and accolades quickly spread among those who knew him
    best.
    “No one was more generous, loving, and encouraging to others than the
    Reverend Paul Bittner,” said Mike Lonneke, W4AAW, in a post to the
    Potomac Valley Radio Club (PVRC). “He called me last week to chat
    about what he and Mary were up to, like getting material together for
    their always long and hilarious Christmas newsletter. He also knocked me
    out with the latest of his funny experiences in his ‘Rent-a-Rev’
    sideline.” Bittner officiated at the June 2 wedding of two well-known
    midwestern contesters.
    Bittner was licensed in 1949 and held the same call sign ever since. He
    and his wife, Mary, WB0PXM, moved in 2000 to “The Farm,” a 120-acre
    spread in west-central Wisconsin. The first of the more than 50 towers
    began sprouting there before their arrival in 1982. As a ham, he enjoyed
    multi-multi contesting and DXing. His favorite band was 160 meters, and
    his favorite contest was the CQ World Wide DX CW Contest. Bittner’s
    son-in-law — Paul Husby, W0UC — operated VHF contests from The Farm
    and was a multi-multi regular as well.
    “His station stands as a great monument to a selfless man of great
    grace and remarkable achievements,” Lonneke said. “Paul once told me
    that AIH stands for ‘already in heaven.’”
    Contester and former ARRL staffer Dave Patton, NN1N, described Bittner
    as “such a good man and truly great ham.” W1AW Station Manager Joe
    Carcia, NJ1Q, noted that Bittner had volunteered to operate as W1AW/9 as
    a headquarters station in the 2019 IARU HF Championship to celebrate his
    decades in ham radio.
    NCJ Editor Scott Wright, K0MD, said that Bittner helped to build
    stations for many midwestern hams. “He was a mentor to hundreds of
    hams, and his enthusiasm for contesting was infectious,” Wright said.
    Bittner had said he wanted to be buried with a bible, a telegraph key,
    and a climbing belt.
    “Thank you for giving so much of yourself to me and the rest of the
    ham community,” said contester Scott Neader. “We will never forget
    you.”
    FCC Fines Amateur Radio Licensee $25,000 for Operating Unlicensed FM
    Station
    11/01/2018
    In an FCC Enforcement Bureau case going back to early 2015, a Paterson,
    New Jersey, Amateur Radio licensee has been penalized in the amount of
    $25,000 for allegedly continuing to operate an unlicensed FM radio
    station. The FCC issued a Forfeiture Order on October 30 to Winston A.
    Tulloch, KC2ALN, a General class licensee. The fine followed an April
    2018 Notice of Apparent Liability for Forfeiture(NAL) issued to Tulloch
    for alleged “willful and repeated violation” of Section 301 of the
    Communications Act of 1934, as amended, by operating an unlicensed FM
    radio station on 90.9 MHz in Paterson. Tulloch did not respond to the
    NAL, the FCC indicated.
    “Commission action in this area is essential because unlicensed radio
    stations do not broadcast Emergency Alert Service messages and therefore
    create a public safety hazard for their listener,” the FCC said in the
    Forfeiture Order. “Moreover, unlicensed radio stations create a danger
    of interference to licensed communications and undermine the
    Commission’s authority over broadcast radio operations.”
    Following up on February 2015 complaints regarding pirate radio
    operations in Paterson, FCC agents spotted a signal on 90.9 MHz that
    “appeared to be an unauthorized radio station.” Agents determined
    the signal was emanating from a multi-family dwelling and noticed an FM
    antenna on the structure. The measured field strength exceeded the
    limits allowed for Part 15 unlicensed devices.
    Through a solicitation broadcast on the station for advertisers and a
    vehicle parked outside the building, the FCC agents were able to
    determine that the telephone number in the announcement belonged to
    Tulloch, and the car was registered in his name. FCC agents made several
    visits to Paterson in late 2015 and early 2016. In October of 2016,
    agents returned to Paterson and determined that the signal source had
    relocated to another nearby multi-family structure. A Notice of
    Unlicensed Operation (NOUO) was posted on the door of the building and
    the following month, the FCC mailed an NOUO to Tulloch.
    Subsequent visits revealed that the station was still in operation, and,
    at some point, had moved back to its prior location. Additional NOUOs
    were issued. Finally, on September 15, 2017, two agents returned to
    Paterson and determined that the station no longer was on the air.
    In the Forfeiture Order, the FCC incorporated by reference the details
    of the investigation spelled out in the earlier NAL.
    The Tulloch case is among dozens that the FCC Enforcement Bureau has
    initiated in the past couple of years in efforts to shut down pirate
    broadcasters across the US, the vast majority of which are not FCC
    amateur licensees.
    New CEO Wants ARRL to Serve All Ages and Amateur Radio Interests
    11/01/2018
    Newly elected ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX, is still on the uphill
    side of the learning curve as he acquaints himself with ARRL
    Headquarters and the nearly 90 staffers who work there. The New Jersey
    native arrived at HQ on October 15 and has spent much of his time since
    meeting with department managers and others to get his bearings, with an
    eye toward building consensus and aligning people, programs, and
    services in the same direction.
    “I’m still trying to understand what is working and where the
    challenges are,” Michel said. “Once I understand where the
    challenges are, I need to understand why. Before I make any changes in
    what we’re doing, I need to make sure the change is a step in the
    right direction and for the right reasons, and not kind of a random
    process.”
    Michel would like to see ARRL focus on the future of Amateur Radio and
    not become the redoubt of a particular generation of radio amateur or
    interest group. He said, “Ham radio shouldn’t abandon the old
    guardians of the hobby, but at the same time, it needs to have new
    things that appeal to people who have different interests and different
    passions.”
    Ham radio appears currently entrenched with opposition often expressed
    to FT8 and other digital modes and protocols that bend Amateur Radio
    traditions and conventions, Michel observed. However, as he sees it,
    technology for the whole of Amateur Radio has been changing, and
    detractors to advances have always been present. He’d like ARRL to
    encourage more technological diversity without creating controversy.
    “My kick is seeing the technology advance,” the former IEEE
    president and CEO said. “I want to see hams embrace the new technology
    — as long as we do that in a way that those who don’t adopt the new
    technology won’t feel abandoned.” In his view, the real reason
    behind the continued enthusiasm for CW “is not the technology; it’s
    the legacy.”
    At the same time, resources should reflect usage and interest, with
    respect to the spectrum and with respect to how many pages QST devotes
    to a particular interest area. “Everything should reflect the growth
    and change, without abandoning the legacy interests.”
    Acknowledging the incessant push to get more young people into Amateur
    Radio, Michel wants to explore ways “to morph some of the League’s
    processes and services and products into something that would appeal to
    the newer generation of hams.”
    “Young people in general don’t join organizations, but they join
    causes,” he said. “With that kind of attitude, how do we develop the
    same kind of ability for people interested in Amateur Radio to
    self-organize around causes? And if we can design the infrastructure
    around that, maybe they’ll see value in ARRL and become a new type of
    member — not one who necessarily comes to ham club meetings once a
    month but finds the League can facilitate what they want to do.”
    Michel said he’s always enjoyed tinkering with ham gear, building it,
    modifying it, and repairing it, and then making it do something new or
    different. He concedes that while he has not had an opportunity to do
    much hamming as he’s moved around with the military and for academic
    and business pursuits, he’d like to become more active, and he is
    presently exploring his options as an apartment dweller. As for FT8,
    he’d like to try it, if for no other reason than the novelty.
    Michel said he definitely wants to encourage partnerships with other
    organizations with which ARRL might share some common ground, including
    IEEE.
    “We can’t do everything ourselves. We have to find partnerships,”
    he said. Some IEEE operating units would be applicable to Amateur Radio,
    and he’s already heard from two unit heads that are both hams.
    Michel also feels that radio amateurs need to extend their gaze beyond
    the everyday nuts and bolts of Amateur Radio operating. “What we need
    to do is protect the spectrum from competition, develop interest in the
    various facets of Amateur Radio, and not try to pick fights ‘in
    house,’” he said. “Spectrum is the gold of the 21st century.”
    Doreen Bogdan-Martin, KD2JTX, Elected as ITU Telecommunication
    Development Director
    11/02/2018
    ARRL member Doreen Bogdan-Martin, KD2JTX, has been elected as Director
    of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Telecommunication
    Development Bureau (BDT). Her election, on the first ballot in a
    three-way race, came on November 1 at the ITU’s Plenipotentiary 2018
    Conference in Dubai. Bogdan-Martin becomes the first woman on the ITU
    executive team. Running on a campaign theme of “Sustainable Digital
    Development for All,” Bogdan-Martin said she would work toward a
    Telecommunication Development Bureau that helps its members benefit from
    the drivers of innovation and economic development.
    “We must help governments integrate ICTs into their national
    development frameworks, actively support[ing] their ministries to ensure
    digital development strategies emphasize human capacity, digital skills,
    and empowering people,” she said. “I envisage the BDT redoubling its
    efforts on digital inclusion, working to bring online the remaining 3.9
    billion people still offline.”
    Her candidacy had strong support from US officials, including Secretary
    of State Mike Pompeo, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, and FCC Chairman
    Ajit Pai.
    “Ms. Bogdan-Martin is a true leader and professional who has dedicated
    more than 25 years to ensuring that all people can benefit from
    information and communication technologies,” Pompeo wrote in endorsing
    her candidacy. “I have no doubt that Ms. Bogdan-Martin will be a
    driving force to ensure connectivity for all.”
    FCC Chairman Pai extended congratulations to Bogdan-Martin, who, he
    said, “has deep expertise in development issues and will play a
    pivotal role in accelerating the spread of digital communications
    throughout the globe.”
    Bogdan-Martin has more than 20 years of experience at the ITU. During
    the past decade she has headed the ITU General Secretariat Strategic
    Planning and Membership Department for the Secretary-General. Her
    responsibilities have included developing the ITU’s strategic and
    operational plans in the context of ICT trends and the global
    information economy, representing the ITU in engagement with other
    bodies, and directing and managing all ITU global conferences.
    She launched Equals Global Partnership, a multi-stakeholder
    evidence-based network bringing women to technology, and technology to
    women. She also directed the first ITU global youth summit that featured
    700 participants and 3,000 remote participants, and she established the
    ITU office to the United Nations where she has been serving as ITU
    Representative to the UN High-Level Committee on Programmes (HLCP).
    2018 SKYWARN Recognition Day
    December 1, 2018 from 0000z to 2400z
    SKYWARN™ Recognition Day was developed in 1999 by the National Weather
    Service and the American Radio Relay League. It celebrates the
    contributions that volunteer SKYWARN™ radio operators make to the
    National Weather Service. During the day SKYWARN™ operators visit NWS
    offices and contact other radio operators across the world.
    SKYWARN Recognition Day Operating Instructions
    1. Object For all amateur stations to exchange QSO information with as
    many National Weather Service Stations as possible on 80, 40, 20, 15,
    10, 6, and 2 meter bands plus the 70 centimeter band. Contacts via
    repeaters are permitted. SKYWARN™ Recognition Day serves to celebrate
    the contributions to public safety made by amateur radio operators
    during threatening weather.
    2. Date NWS stations will operate December 1, 2018, from 0000 – 2400
    UTC.
    3. Exchange: Call sign, signal report, QTH, and a one or two-word
    description of the weather occurring at your site (“sunny”, “partly
    cloudy”, “windy”, etc.).
    4. Modes: NWS stations will work various modes including SSB, FM, AM,
    RTTY, CW, FT8 and PSK31. While working digital modes, special event
    stations will append “NWS” to their call sign (e.g., N0A/NWS).
    5.Station Control Operator: It is suggested that during SRD operations a
    non-NWS volunteer should serve as a control operator for your station.
    6. Event and QSL Information: The National Weather Service will provide
    event information via the internet. Event certificates will once again
    be electronic and printable from the main website after the conclusion
    of SRD.
    7. Log Submission: To submit your log summary for SRD use the online
    submission form.
    Deadline for log submission is January 31, 2019.
    ——————————————————————————————————————————————
    ***2019 ARRL Field Day is June 22-23
    2019 Field Day will be held June 22-23, 2019.  Field Day is always held
    on the 4th full weekend in June.
    The 2019 Rules will be updated/released in March 2019.
    2018 Field Day results will appear in December QST
    LA SECTION RESULTS:
    LOUISIANA SECTION 2018 ARRL FIELD DAY RESULTS
    (PER DECEMBER 2018 QST)
    TOTAL ENTRIES: 24
    Score listings are grouped according to the number of transmitters in
    simultaneous operation and their entry class. The listings show club or
    group name, call sign(s) used, total number of QSOs, number indicating
    power output used, number of participants, and total score including
    bonus points and ARRL Section.
    THREE OR MORE PERSON CLUB/NON-CLUB PORTABLE
    1A-COMMERCIAL
    WESTSIDE ARC  W5ABD  32/2/6/314 LA
    2A
    LA DELTA RC  KC5DR(+WA5WX)  395/2/45/1,982  LA
    SOUTH LAKE CHARLES HAM GRP  KI5EE  431/2/4/1,646  LA
    3A
    BATON ROUGE ARC  W5GIX(+K5LSU)  731/2/60/3,142  LA
    SPRINGHILL ARC LLC  N5II  240/2/6/698  LA
    3A COMMERCIAL
    SE LA ARC  WM5T  218/2/7/522  LA
    ACADIANA ARA  W5DDL(+W5EXI)  1,365/2/20/3,836  LA
    5A COMMERCIAL
    CENTRAL LA ARC  N5I  1,216/2/35/4,254  LA
    ONE OR TWO PERSONS/CLUB/NON-CLUB PORTABLE
    1B-1 OPERATOR
    K5BIU  219/2/1/1,024  LA
    N5JSC  118/2/1/386  LA
    K5TAE  28/2/1/206  LA
    1B-1 OPERATOR BATTERY
    K5SL  515/5/1/5,400 LA
    HOME STATIONS COMMERCIAL POWER
    1D
    K1DW  175/2/1/750  LA
    AA5AU  318/1/1/636  LA
    K2ZP  57/2/1/164  LA
    KG5GJT  45/2/1/140  LA
    HOME STATIONS EMERGENCY POWER
    1E
    KA5M  406/2/1/1,774  LA
    3E
    W5GAD  1,085/2/57/4,878  LA
    HOME STATIONS EMERGENCY POWER-BATTERY
    EOC STATIONS
    2F
    BAYOULAND EMERGENCY ARC  W5BMC  12/2/11/474  LA
    5F
    OZONE ARC  W5SLA  102/2/25/808  LA
    ——————————————————————————————————————————————
    ARES:  LA Section
    October 2018
    ARES Members:  352
    Active nets: 53 / with NTS Liaison:  3
    Number of Exercises/Training:  41 / 361 hours
    Number of Public Service Events:  2 / 432 hours
    Number of Emergency Operations:  0 / 0 hours
    Number of Skywarn Events:  3 / 34 hours
    Total:  46 / 827
    ——————————————————————————————————————————————
    Louisiana Traffic Report October 2018
    SESSIONS    QNI    QTC    QTR
    16                105    20      1.5 HOURS
    LOUISIANA HF ARES NET
    SSESSIONS QNI QTC  QTR
    4                110  0      2 HOURS
    73,
    Jimmy Lewis/AB5YS
    LOUISIANA SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER
    ——————————————————————————————————————————————
    Subject: LA Section 2018 Ham of the Year Nominations now being accepted
    All LA Section ARRL Members,
    Nominations for the LA Section 2018 Ham of the Year Award are now being
    accepted thru December 31, 2018.  The award will be announced at the
    Hammond Hamfest January 19, 2019.
    The nomination procedure is as follows:
    1)    Please follow these instructions.  Complete the form and attach your
    documentation. The Award Selection Committee will only see your attached
    documentation for each individual with nothing to identify the nominee.
    a)    Minimum requirements for a nominee – 5 years uninterrupted ARRL
    membership.  (Committee may waive this for a new Ham who is an ARRL
    member and has shown exemplary participation and accomplishments.)
    b)    On an attached page please use only BULLET statements to document
    the
    nominee’s participation and accomplishments.
    c)    Do not use a name, call sign or any statement information that would
    identify the nominee in the bullet statements.
    2)    Mail or email the completed nomination to the ARRL Louisiana Section
    Manager (Mailing address available on ARRL website or latest issue of
    QST).
    3)    The Section Manager will appoint an independent selection committee
    to make the final selection.
    4)    Additional support documents (pictures, news articles) may be
    attached, but will not be used unless there is a tie or verification is
    required.
    To obtain the nomination form please email me at K5JMR@ARRL.ORG and I
    will email you the nomination form.  Please return to me no later than
    December 31, 2018.
    Thank you!
    ——————————————————————–
    ARRL Louisiana Section
    Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR
    UPCOMING HAMFESTS:  LA SECTION
    HAMFEST/CONVENTION
    12/15/2018 | MARA Christmas Hamfest
    Location: Minden, LA
    Type: ARRL Hamfest
    Sponsor: Minden Amateur Radio Association
    Website: http://n5rd.org
    HAMFEST/CONVENTION
    01/19/2019 | 38th SELARC Hammond HamFest
    Location: Hammond, LA
    Type: ARRL Hamfest
    Sponsor: Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club
    UPCOMING HAMFESTS: DELTA DIVISION
    HAMFEST/CONVENTION
    12/01/2018 | Arkansas DX Association Annual Conference
    Location: North Little Rock, AR
    Type: ARRL Convention
    Sponsor: Arkansas DX Association
    HAMFEST/CONVENTION
    01/25/2019 | Mississippi State Convention (Capital City Hamfest)
    Location: Jackson, MS
    Type: ARRL Convention
    Sponsor: Jackson Amateur Radio Club
    ——————————————————————–
    ARRL Louisiana Section
    Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR
    ——————————————————————–
    To unsubscribe from messages, go to:

  • Nicholas Frederick <djnick7@gmail.com>
    To:John Mark Robertson
    Nov 28, 2018 at 12:08 PM

    Hey John Mark,

    I don’t really care, but I wanted you to know that I was left off the list of license upgrade. I upgraded at the same time as the rest of those guys. Like I said, I don’t care that I was left off, so don’t worry about it. I just wanted to make sure that you knew that I am now a full Amateur Extra.

    73,

    Nicholas Frederick – W4NDF

    District Emergency Coordinator – LA Region 1 ARES

    ARES Official Emergency Station

    Member – ARRL, ARES, JARC, DDXA, SELCOM, SKYWARN

    Vice Commander – USCG Aux Flotilla 47

    Email: W4NDF@arrl.net

    Phone: (504) 430-6018

    Hamshack Hotline: 618

    Fax: (504) 459-9300

    Emergency Line: (504) 383-4382

    cid:image001.png@01D38248.FC1F1CF0

    From: ARRL Members Only Web site <memberlist@www.arrl.org>
    Date: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 10:51 AM
    To: <w4ndf@arrl.net>
    Subject: Louisiana Section Managers Newsletter November 2018

    LOUISIANA SECTION MANAGERS NEWSLETTER NOVEMBER 2018

    SILENT KEYS

    Norbet Newby WA5CFW

    Elizabeth Denton KA5MTG

    Charles Winder, Jr. K5FNN

    Frank Thrash W4DLZ

    Henry P. Forbes KC5KJ

    Sam L. Richardson W5SMH

    Carl Beck W5BEK

    NEW HAMS

    Report for 2018-11-02

    Jared A Mayeaux, KI5BVA

    Donnis H O’bryan, KI5CBV

    Ronald D Porter, AG5RW

    T J Taplin, KI5CBW

    Rex A Schuttler, KI5BUE

    LICENSE UPGRADES

    Report for 2018-11-02

    Camille J Guidry, KG5SWD

    David J Cantrelle, KF5WMS

    Michael J Decossas, KB5OZE

    Gregory Speyrer, KE5DEU

    Michael A Carmouche, KG5TGG

    Dorothy L Minor, KF5YNM

    Richard L Cutrer, KF5TQT

    Shirley M Jordan, KI5BFH

    Patrick L Widner, KG5AAH

    NEW ARRL MEMBERS

    Report for 2018-11-02

    James P Marra, N5HZ

    Divini Luccioni, N3DI

    Ted F Vander Wiede, KB1NDX

    Nathan A Cooper, K5ZFC

    Steven D Brinkley

    William J O Donnell, W5VPM

    Susan Anderson, KE5FMX

    Timothy Sonnier, N5RKK

    Abbigail Wilson, KF5BEW

    Kendra Wilson, KF5FYS

    Galen D Wilson, KF5BET

    John B Maylard, KC6MNO

    David W Ables, KE5NIJ

    Kevin J Abshire, KE5RKT

    Paul J Maia, KB5AIF

    Leonard W Martin, WD5DNQ

    Keith A McDavid, KF5WTK

    Kevin N Boykin, N5CDB

    Ronald D Porter, AG5RW

    Terry J Peek, KD5BIO

    Charles H Edwards, WC5K

    Jeffrey W Hall, KA5YZQ

    ——————————————————————————————————————————————

    FROM THE ARRL

    Well-Known Contester, “Antenna Farmer” Paul Bittner, W0AIH, SK

    11/01/2018

    The Reverend Paul Bittner, W0AIH, of Fall Creek, Wisconsin, died doing

    what he loved on October 31, when a tower-climbing mishap claimed his

    life at his well-known antenna farm. The ARRL Life Member and Maxim

    Society member was 84. A member of the CQ Contesting Hall of Fame and

    retired Lutheran pastor, Bittner was a well-known and respected figure

    within the Amateur Radio community and a prolific contester and DXer.

    His call sign was nearly always present in most major operating events,

    and even in a few lesser-known contests, and news of his tragic death

    and condolences and accolades quickly spread among those who knew him

    best.

    “No one was more generous, loving, and encouraging to others than the

    Reverend Paul Bittner,” said Mike Lonneke, W4AAW, in a post to the

    Potomac Valley Radio Club (PVRC). “He called me last week to chat

    about what he and Mary were up to, like getting material together for

    their always long and hilarious Christmas newsletter. He also knocked me

    out with the latest of his funny experiences in his ‘Rent-a-Rev’

    sideline.” Bittner officiated at the June 2 wedding of two well-known

    midwestern contesters.

    Bittner was licensed in 1949 and held the same call sign ever since. He

    and his wife, Mary, WB0PXM, moved in 2000 to “The Farm,” a 120-acre

    spread in west-central Wisconsin. The first of the more than 50 towers

    began sprouting there before their arrival in 1982. As a ham, he enjoyed

    multi-multi contesting and DXing. His favorite band was 160 meters, and

    his favorite contest was the CQ World Wide DX CW Contest. Bittner’s

    son-in-law — Paul Husby, W0UC — operated VHF contests from The Farm

    and was a multi-multi regular as well.

    “His station stands as a great monument to a selfless man of great

    grace and remarkable achievements,” Lonneke said. “Paul once told me

    that AIH stands for ‘already in heaven.’”

    Contester and former ARRL staffer Dave Patton, NN1N, described Bittner

    as “such a good man and truly great ham.” W1AW Station Manager Joe

    Carcia, NJ1Q, noted that Bittner had volunteered to operate as W1AW/9 as

    a headquarters station in the 2019 IARU HF Championship to celebrate his

    decades in ham radio.

    NCJ Editor Scott Wright, K0MD, said that Bittner helped to build

    stations for many midwestern hams. “He was a mentor to hundreds of

    hams, and his enthusiasm for contesting was infectious,” Wright said.

    Bittner had said he wanted to be buried with a bible, a telegraph key,

    and a climbing belt.

    “Thank you for giving so much of yourself to me and the rest of the

    ham community,” said contester Scott Neader. “We will never forget

    you.”

    FCC Fines Amateur Radio Licensee $25,000 for Operating Unlicensed FM

    Station

    11/01/2018

    In an FCC Enforcement Bureau case going back to early 2015, a Paterson,

    New Jersey, Amateur Radio licensee has been penalized in the amount of

    $25,000 for allegedly continuing to operate an unlicensed FM radio

    station. The FCC issued a Forfeiture Order on October 30 to Winston A.

    Tulloch, KC2ALN, a General class licensee. The fine followed an April

    2018 Notice of Apparent Liability for Forfeiture(NAL) issued to Tulloch

    for alleged “willful and repeated violation” of Section 301 of the

    Communications Act of 1934, as amended, by operating an unlicensed FM

    radio station on 90.9 MHz in Paterson. Tulloch did not respond to the

    NAL, the FCC indicated.

    “Commission action in this area is essential because unlicensed radio

    stations do not broadcast Emergency Alert Service messages and therefore

    create a public safety hazard for their listener,” the FCC said in the

    Forfeiture Order. “Moreover, unlicensed radio stations create a danger

    of interference to licensed communications and undermine the

    Commission’s authority over broadcast radio operations.”

    Following up on February 2015 complaints regarding pirate radio

    operations in Paterson, FCC agents spotted a signal on 90.9 MHz that

    “appeared to be an unauthorized radio station.” Agents determined

    the signal was emanating from a multi-family dwelling and noticed an FM

    antenna on the structure. The measured field strength exceeded the

    limits allowed for Part 15 unlicensed devices.

    Through a solicitation broadcast on the station for advertisers and a

    vehicle parked outside the building, the FCC agents were able to

    determine that the telephone number in the announcement belonged to

    Tulloch, and the car was registered in his name. FCC agents made several

    visits to Paterson in late 2015 and early 2016. In October of 2016,

    agents returned to Paterson and determined that the signal source had

    relocated to another nearby multi-family structure. A Notice of

    Unlicensed Operation (NOUO) was posted on the door of the building and

    the following month, the FCC mailed an NOUO to Tulloch.

    Subsequent visits revealed that the station was still in operation, and,

    at some point, had moved back to its prior location. Additional NOUOs

    were issued. Finally, on September 15, 2017, two agents returned to

    Paterson and determined that the station no longer was on the air.

    In the Forfeiture Order, the FCC incorporated by reference the details

    of the investigation spelled out in the earlier NAL.

    The Tulloch case is among dozens that the FCC Enforcement Bureau has

    initiated in the past couple of years in efforts to shut down pirate

    broadcasters across the US, the vast majority of which are not FCC

    amateur licensees.

    New CEO Wants ARRL to Serve All Ages and Amateur Radio Interests

    11/01/2018

    Newly elected ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX, is still on the uphill

    side of the learning curve as he acquaints himself with ARRL

    Headquarters and the nearly 90 staffers who work there. The New Jersey

    native arrived at HQ on October 15 and has spent much of his time since

    meeting with department managers and others to get his bearings, with an

    eye toward building consensus and aligning people, programs, and

    services in the same direction.

    “I’m still trying to understand what is working and where the

    challenges are,” Michel said. “Once I understand where the

    challenges are, I need to understand why. Before I make any changes in

    what we’re doing, I need to make sure the change is a step in the

    right direction and for the right reasons, and not kind of a random

    process.”

    Michel would like to see ARRL focus on the future of Amateur Radio and

    not become the redoubt of a particular generation of radio amateur or

    interest group. He said, “Ham radio shouldn’t abandon the old

    guardians of the hobby, but at the same time, it needs to have new

    things that appeal to people who have different interests and different

    passions.”

    Ham radio appears currently entrenched with opposition often expressed

    to FT8 and other digital modes and protocols that bend Amateur Radio

    traditions and conventions, Michel observed. However, as he sees it,

    technology for the whole of Amateur Radio has been changing, and

    detractors to advances have always been present. He’d like ARRL to

    encourage more technological diversity without creating controversy.

    “My kick is seeing the technology advance,” the former IEEE

    president and CEO said. “I want to see hams embrace the new technology

    — as long as we do that in a way that those who don’t adopt the new

    technology won’t feel abandoned.” In his view, the real reason

    behind the continued enthusiasm for CW “is not the technology; it’s

    the legacy.”

    At the same time, resources should reflect usage and interest, with

    respect to the spectrum and with respect to how many pages QST devotes

    to a particular interest area. “Everything should reflect the growth

    and change, without abandoning the legacy interests.”

    Acknowledging the incessant push to get more young people into Amateur

    Radio, Michel wants to explore ways “to morph some of the League’s

    processes and services and products into something that would appeal to

    the newer generation of hams.”

    “Young people in general don’t join organizations, but they join

    causes,” he said. “With that kind of attitude, how do we develop the

    same kind of ability for people interested in Amateur Radio to

    self-organize around causes? And if we can design the infrastructure

    around that, maybe they’ll see value in ARRL and become a new type of

    member — not one who necessarily comes to ham club meetings once a

    month but finds the League can facilitate what they want to do.”

    Michel said he’s always enjoyed tinkering with ham gear, building it,

    modifying it, and repairing it, and then making it do something new or

    different. He concedes that while he has not had an opportunity to do

    much hamming as he’s moved around with the military and for academic

    and business pursuits, he’d like to become more active, and he is

    presently exploring his options as an apartment dweller. As for FT8,

    he’d like to try it, if for no other reason than the novelty.

    Michel said he definitely wants to encourage partnerships with other

    organizations with which ARRL might share some common ground, including

    IEEE.

    “We can’t do everything ourselves. We have to find partnerships,”

    he said. Some IEEE operating units would be applicable to Amateur Radio,

    and he’s already heard from two unit heads that are both hams.

    Michel also feels that radio amateurs need to extend their gaze beyond

    the everyday nuts and bolts of Amateur Radio operating. “What we need

    to do is protect the spectrum from competition, develop interest in the

    various facets of Amateur Radio, and not try to pick fights ‘in

    house,’” he said. “Spectrum is the gold of the 21st century.”

    Doreen Bogdan-Martin, KD2JTX, Elected as ITU Telecommunication

    Development Director

    11/02/2018

    ARRL member Doreen Bogdan-Martin, KD2JTX, has been elected as Director

    of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Telecommunication

    Development Bureau (BDT). Her election, on the first ballot in a

    three-way race, came on November 1 at the ITU’s Plenipotentiary 2018

    Conference in Dubai. Bogdan-Martin becomes the first woman on the ITU

    executive team. Running on a campaign theme of “Sustainable Digital

    Development for All,” Bogdan-Martin said she would work toward a

    Telecommunication Development Bureau that helps its members benefit from

    the drivers of innovation and economic development.

    “We must help governments integrate ICTs into their national

    development frameworks, actively support[ing] their ministries to ensure

    digital development strategies emphasize human capacity, digital skills,

    and empowering people,” she said. “I envisage the BDT redoubling its

    efforts on digital inclusion, working to bring online the remaining 3.9

    billion people still offline.”

    Her candidacy had strong support from US officials, including Secretary

    of State Mike Pompeo, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, and FCC Chairman

    Ajit Pai.

    “Ms. Bogdan-Martin is a true leader and professional who has dedicated

    more than 25 years to ensuring that all people can benefit from

    information and communication technologies,” Pompeo wrote in endorsing

    her candidacy. “I have no doubt that Ms. Bogdan-Martin will be a

    driving force to ensure connectivity for all.”

    FCC Chairman Pai extended congratulations to Bogdan-Martin, who, he

    said, “has deep expertise in development issues and will play a

    pivotal role in accelerating the spread of digital communications

    throughout the globe.”

    Bogdan-Martin has more than 20 years of experience at the ITU. During

    the past decade she has headed the ITU General Secretariat Strategic

    Planning and Membership Department for the Secretary-General. Her

    responsibilities have included developing the ITU’s strategic and

    operational plans in the context of ICT trends and the global

    information economy, representing the ITU in engagement with other

    bodies, and directing and managing all ITU global conferences.

    She launched Equals Global Partnership, a multi-stakeholder

    evidence-based network bringing women to technology, and technology to

    women. She also directed the first ITU global youth summit that featured

    700 participants and 3,000 remote participants, and she established the

    ITU office to the United Nations where she has been serving as ITU

    Representative to the UN High-Level Committee on Programmes (HLCP).

    2018 SKYWARN Recognition Day

    December 1, 2018 from 0000z to 2400z

    SKYWARN™ Recognition Day was developed in 1999 by the National Weather

    Service and the American Radio Relay League. It celebrates the

    contributions that volunteer SKYWARN™ radio operators make to the

    National Weather Service. During the day SKYWARN™ operators visit NWS

    offices and contact other radio operators across the world.

    SKYWARN Recognition Day Operating Instructions

    1. Object For all amateur stations to exchange QSO information with as

    many National Weather Service Stations as possible on 80, 40, 20, 15,

    10, 6, and 2 meter bands plus the 70 centimeter band. Contacts via

    repeaters are permitted. SKYWARN™ Recognition Day serves to celebrate

    the contributions to public safety made by amateur radio operators

    during threatening weather.

    2. Date NWS stations will operate December 1, 2018, from 0000 – 2400

    UTC.

    3. Exchange: Call sign, signal report, QTH, and a one or two-word

    description of the weather occurring at your site (“sunny”, “partly

    cloudy”, “windy”, etc.).

    4. Modes: NWS stations will work various modes including SSB, FM, AM,

    RTTY, CW, FT8 and PSK31. While working digital modes, special event

    stations will append “NWS” to their call sign (e.g., N0A/NWS).

    5.Station Control Operator: It is suggested that during SRD operations a

    non-NWS volunteer should serve as a control operator for your station.

    6. Event and QSL Information: The National Weather Service will provide

    event information via the internet. Event certificates will once again

    be electronic and printable from the main website after the conclusion

    of SRD.

    7. Log Submission: To submit your log summary for SRD use the online

    submission form.

    Deadline for log submission is January 31, 2019.

    ——————————————————————————————————————————————

    ***2019 ARRL Field Day is June 22-23

    2019 Field Day will be held June 22-23, 2019.  Field Day is always held

    on the 4th full weekend in June.

    The 2019 Rules will be updated/released in March 2019.

    2018 Field Day results will appear in December QST

    LA SECTION RESULTS:

    LOUISIANA SECTION 2018 ARRL FIELD DAY RESULTS

    (PER DECEMBER 2018 QST)

    TOTAL ENTRIES: 24

    Score listings are grouped according to the number of transmitters in

    simultaneous operation and their entry class. The listings show club or

    group name, call sign(s) used, total number of QSOs, number indicating

    power output used, number of participants, and total score including

    bonus points and ARRL Section.

    THREE OR MORE PERSON CLUB/NON-CLUB PORTABLE

    1A-COMMERCIAL

    WESTSIDE ARC  W5ABD  32/2/6/314 LA

    2A

    LA DELTA RC  KC5DR(+WA5WX)  395/2/45/1,982  LA

    SOUTH LAKE CHARLES HAM GRP  KI5EE  431/2/4/1,646  LA

    3A

    BATON ROUGE ARC  W5GIX(+K5LSU)  731/2/60/3,142  LA

    SPRINGHILL ARC LLC  N5II  240/2/6/698  LA

    3A COMMERCIAL

    SE LA ARC  WM5T  218/2/7/522  LA

    ACADIANA ARA  W5DDL(+W5EXI)  1,365/2/20/3,836  LA

    5A COMMERCIAL

    CENTRAL LA ARC  N5I  1,216/2/35/4,254  LA

    ONE OR TWO PERSONS/CLUB/NON-CLUB PORTABLE

    1B-1 OPERATOR

    K5BIU  219/2/1/1,024  LA

    N5JSC  118/2/1/386  LA

    K5TAE  28/2/1/206  LA

    1B-1 OPERATOR BATTERY

    K5SL  515/5/1/5,400 LA

    HOME STATIONS COMMERCIAL POWER

    1D

    K1DW  175/2/1/750  LA

    AA5AU  318/1/1/636  LA

    K2ZP  57/2/1/164  LA

    KG5GJT  45/2/1/140  LA

    HOME STATIONS EMERGENCY POWER

    1E

    KA5M  406/2/1/1,774  LA

    3E

    W5GAD  1,085/2/57/4,878  LA

    HOME STATIONS EMERGENCY POWER-BATTERY

    EOC STATIONS

    2F

    BAYOULAND EMERGENCY ARC  W5BMC  12/2/11/474  LA

    5F

    OZONE ARC  W5SLA  102/2/25/808  LA

    ——————————————————————————————————————————————

    ARES:  LA Section

    October 2018

    ARES Members:  352

    Active nets: 53 / with NTS Liaison:  3

    Number of Exercises/Training:  41 / 361 hours

    Number of Public Service Events:  2 / 432 hours

    Number of Emergency Operations:  0 / 0 hours

    Number of Skywarn Events:  3 / 34 hours

    Total:  46 / 827

    ——————————————————————————————————————————————

    Louisiana Traffic Report October 2018

    SESSIONS    QNI    QTC    QTR

    16                105    20      1.5 HOURS

    LOUISIANA HF ARES NET

    SSESSIONS QNI QTC  QTR

    4                110  0      2 HOURS

    73,

    Jimmy Lewis/AB5YS

    LOUISIANA SECTION TRAFFIC MANAGER

    ——————————————————————————————————————————————

    Subject: LA Section 2018 Ham of the Year Nominations now being accepted

    All LA Section ARRL Members,

    Nominations for the LA Section 2018 Ham of the Year Award are now being

    accepted thru December 31, 2018.  The award will be announced at the

    Hammond Hamfest January 19, 2019.

    The nomination procedure is as follows:

    1)            Please follow these instructions.  Complete the form and attach your

    documentation. The Award Selection Committee will only see your attached

    documentation for each individual with nothing to identify the nominee.

    a)            Minimum requirements for a nominee – 5 years uninterrupted ARRL

    membership.  (Committee may waive this for a new Ham who is an ARRL

    member and has shown exemplary participation and accomplishments.)

    b)            On an attached page please use only BULLET statements to document

    the

    nominee’s participation and accomplishments.

    c)            Do not use a name, call sign or any statement information that would

    identify the nominee in the bullet statements.

    2)            Mail or email the completed nomination to the ARRL Louisiana Section

    Manager (Mailing address available on ARRL website or latest issue of

    QST).

    3)            The Section Manager will appoint an independent selection committee

    to make the final selection.

    4)            Additional support documents (pictures, news articles) may be

    attached, but will not be used unless there is a tie or verification is

    required.

    To obtain the nomination form please email me at K5JMR@ARRL.ORG and I

    will email you the nomination form.  Please return to me no later than

    December 31, 2018.

    Thank you!

    ——————————————————————–

    ARRL Louisiana Section

    Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR

    UPCOMING HAMFESTS:  LA SECTION

    HAMFEST/CONVENTION

    12/15/2018 | MARA Christmas Hamfest

    Location: Minden, LA

    Type: ARRL Hamfest

    Sponsor: Minden Amateur Radio Association

    Website: http://n5rd.org

    HAMFEST/CONVENTION

    01/19/2019 | 38th SELARC Hammond HamFest

    Location: Hammond, LA

    Type: ARRL Hamfest

    Sponsor: Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio Club

    UPCOMING HAMFESTS: DELTA DIVISION

    HAMFEST/CONVENTION

    12/01/2018 | Arkansas DX Association Annual Conference

    Location: North Little Rock, AR

    Type: ARRL Convention

    Sponsor: Arkansas DX Association

    HAMFEST/CONVENTION

    01/25/2019 | Mississippi State Convention (Capital City Hamfest)

    Location: Jackson, MS

    Type: ARRL Convention

    Sponsor: Jackson Amateur Radio Club

    Website: http://msham.org

    ——————————————————————–

    ARRL Louisiana Section

    Section Manager: John Mark Robertson, K5JMR

    ——————————————————————–